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October 22, 1950 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-10-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

COLLEE RONDUP

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Campus Movie Location
Intrigues Cal Students

FEMALE DIRECTOR CLAIMS:

Women Equal Men -
By JOEL MCKIBLE
ne field in which a woman can:

As Thespians

.O

By DAVE CRIPPEN
Life was just as real but
not quite as earnest on the na-
tion's campuses last week-prob-
lems present smacked less of
weight and more of froth than us-
ual.
Even on the strife-torn campus
of the University of California at
Berkeley-where the faculty oath
controversy has been raging for
months - something less than
world-shaking was occupying the
spotlight.
THE OATH FIGHT was still
chugging along, but students were
more interested in whether uni-
versity authorities would grant
Red Feather
Drive To Open
Tomorrow
The little fellow who has shown
the nation some new tricks in pi-
ano technique will be at Hill Audi-
torium tomorrow night.,
Sugar Chile Robinson, child
boogie pianist, well-known for his
vigorous use of fists and elbows
in his keyboard exercises is sche-
duled to appear at the Red Fea-
ther Rally scheduled for 7:30 p.m.
at the auditorium.
* * *
THE RALLY, which will kick-
off this year's $136,000 Community
Chest campaign, will feature a
number of other acts, including
Adele Hager, '51 and Beverly Ols-
zgnski '51. Rounding out the en-
tertainment will be the Lyra Male
Chorus and the Ann Arbor High
School Band.
The rallyis strictly for un, ac-
cording to Prof. Edw a r d
Hamm, campus chairman of
the drive.,There will be no ad-
mission charge and definitely no
solititation of funds.

MGM permission to make a film.
on campus.,
Some of Mayer's men, it
seems, had visited Berkeley the
previous week to check on using
it as a background for a romance
in which two "young" college
professors woo and try to win
a coed.
The distaff side of the campus
was especially intrigued by the
studio's announcement that play-
ing the youthful instructors would
be John Hodiak, about 35 years
old, and Ray Milland, 44 years old.
Chances for university approval
of the project seemed bright.
George A. Pettit, assistant to Cali-
fornia President Sproul, who han-
dled the negotiations with the
company, said he thought that
permission would be granted.
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MIN-
NESOTA affairs were taking a
fanciful flight.
The next session of the Minne-
sota legislature will pick an off i-
cial bird for the state of 10,000,
lakes-hitherto birdless. To help
the legislators, the Minnesota stu-
dent paper conducted a poll of pro-
fessors on campus and found them
overwhelmingly pro-loon.
"I admit that I'm an avid sup-
porter of the loon," Prof. Wil-
liam H. Marshall, of the zoology
department said enthusistically.
"One associates the bird im-
mediately,' he went on to ex-
plain, "with the wilderness area
which is Minnesota's unique
drawing card."
The other instructors polled were
also for the loon, most of them for
the same reason. But there was
one who claimed that the loon was
a versatile bird-that it was near-
ly as much at home in the cities
as it was in the lake wilderness.
The returns from the faculty
were in. Now it only remained to
be seen whether the legislature
would be as looney as the instruct-
ors.

do as good a job as a man is the'
theatre, according to Marie Miller
director of the Student Players
new production, "Light Up The.
Sky."t
'I am thoroughly convinced thatt
the theatre is a wonderful field for'
women." Many of the feminine at.
tributes such as sympathy, inter
est in people, an artistic feelint'
amc the ability to weld a, group tc
gether are useful and neceysar.
for the direction of a play. she
added
* * *
IN HER CAPACITY as director
for the new production, Mrs. Mil-
ler said, "after a great many yearn
of directing throughout the noun
try, I find the Student Players a
most cooperative group. They haf
earnestness .of purpose and af wiUl-
ingness to work together th4tde-
lights a director's heart."
"Most of them are inexper-
enced actors who, learning their
'trade' are nevertheless turning
in some very fine performances,"
she added.
When speaking of the backstage
crew Mrs. Miller's- praise was very
high "Some have had stock ex-
perience, some are completely in-
experienced, but by pooling their
resources we hope to have a fine
show technically," Don Hawley,
'51, has designed and executed the
set, which Mrs. Miller termed
"beautiful" and "well designed."
*.* *
ONE OF THE PROBLEMS Ion-
fronting her when casting for the
play was that out of the one hun-
dred tryouts that appeared she

...........

Approval of
Appointments
made Known
Three appointments were ap-
proved by the Board of Regents at
their October meeting yesterday.
Prof. Edward L. Walker was
named acting chairman of the psy-
chology department for the *first
semester of the current academic
year. He will fill this position dur-
ing the absence on leave of Prof.
Donald L. Marquis.
Prof. Marquis will spend the se-
mester at the Massachusetts In-
stitute of Technology working on
a project for the State Depart-,
ment.
+ "
ALSO APPOINTED at the Board
meeting was Dorothy Schroeder as
assistant professor of social work
in the, Institute of Social Work,
effective Jan. 1, 1951.
Dr. Henry Gilbert was named
research psychologist in the Insti-
tute for Social Research for a per-
iod of 10, months beginning last
Monday.
The resignation of Prof. John
A. Perkins as professor of political
science and assistant provost was
accepted by the Regents to be ef-
fective Oct. 31.

toozoncl oC.ijte t'

. with LEAH MARKS

For those who enjoy good com-
edy shows, Tuesday is the night to
sit back and listen to two of the
best.
The only hitch is that the "Bob
Hope Show" and "Life with Luigi"
both reach the airwaves at 9 p.m.
on WWJ and WJR respectively.
There is usually little difficulty
in deciding which to hear, how-
ever, since each appeals to its own
special type of audience.
. s t
"LIFE WITH LUIGI" is com-
posed mainly of situational comedy
and character humor; Bob Hope's
prograh is filled with seemingly
spontaneous and witty chatter
which digs for belly laughs.
Bob Hope has returned to the
airwaves for the twelfth year
with a much-needed new format.
The wisecracks are no longer
chiefly local jokes, understood
only by the "live" audience,
Hope is keeping his show more in
line vwith national humor.
There are less skits and more
fun. This is probably because the

old standbys Jerry Colonna and
Vera Vague are not there to for-
tray stock characters in poor
sketches.
A group of immigrants who have
recently come to the land of -ree
dom form the cast for "Life with-
Luigi" which gives the audienci an
insight into a, kind of life it knowg
little about with some 'chuckles
thrown in.
Business letters frighten Luigi
and his friend Pasquale agrees to
straighten out the trouble if Luigi
will marry his daughter.
This slim plot forms the ,sell
for comedy concerning Luigi pwjb
wants to do everything cor ectly
and ,hardly ever succeeds.
Other Good Comedy Shows:
Today
7 p.m. WJR-Jack Benny
Show
8:30 p.m.-Red Skelton
Show

J

7

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
SCRIPT STUDY-Marie Miller, director, and Burt Sapowitch, 51,
producer and president of the Student Players, check the script
for their fall production of Moss Hart's riotous comedy "Light
Up The Sky."

. #

. . .

T

had to choose eleven students.
"Lots of good people couldn't be
used. We could have cast the show
three times," she said.
About the play itself Mrs. Mil-
ler was very enthusiastic. "It is
good, bright comedy about the
theatre, and good-humoredly
pokes fun at theatre people. It
is one of the best comedies writ-
ten in recent years."
The play's popularity is eviaent
in that "Light Up The Sky" was
one of the red-hot summer stock
productions.

i

IN ADDITION to her work as
director for the Student Players,
Mrs. Miller has a radio show which
originates from Ann Arbor. It is
an interview type program. Some
of her recent guests haver been
Adolph Menjou and Mrs. Eleanor
Roosevelt.
"Light Up The Sky" will oe given
on Oct. 26, 27, and 28 in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre. Tickets are
priced at $1.00, 90 cents and 60
cents. Reduced rates on all seats
and stage stars appeared in star-
ring roles.

Wednesday
8 p.m.WWJ-Halls of ivy
with Ronald and Benita
Coleman : :

AS ADVERTISED IN VOGUE

City Planner
To Speak Here
Frederick J. Osborn, English city
planner, will give a public lecture
on town planning at 4:15 p.m.
next Wednesday in the Rackham
Amphitheatre.
The lecture, which is sponsored
by the College of Architecture and
Design, will not be overly techni-
cal, and the public: is urged to at-
tend, according to Dean Wells I.
Bennett of the college.
* * *
Osborn, who has taken an active
part in .the garden city movement
in England, is on a cross-country
tour, stopping at colleges thrdugh-
out the country, Dear Bennett
said.
He has traveled here before and
is well-known, Dean Bennett add-
ed.

Communists find some of their
easiest targets among disillusioned
and frustrated people, ,according
to Prof. William Clark Trow of
the psychology department.
Prof. Trow, speakingbefore the
Southwestern Michigan UNESCO
conference in Kalamazoo yester-
day, explained that it is these
lonely persons who fall prey to
Two Students Die
In Highway Crash
Two Owosso youths, John Ding-
wall and Gerald Hinspeter, the
first a University student, were
killed yesterday in a car-truck col-
lision on U.S. 12 between Jackson
and Ann Arbor.
Their deaths pushed the death
toll on Michigan highways for the
early part of the weekend to nine,
a total which traffic officials said
was far above normal.

EASY RED MARKS:
Frustrated People Called Good
Communist Targets, byTrow

Communist groups because the
Communists take them in, build
them up and then after indoctrin-
ating them with the party line,
send them out to carry out Com-
munist purposes.
* * * .
THE ESSENTIALLY norm al
person, who does the best he can
but just doesn't get anywhere is'
often embittered, Prof. Trow said.,

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ZO,
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fttbulb 1tt" 1
P, .:

r

He begins to feel as if
world is against him and so'
comes an easy mark for
high sounding promises of
Communists

the
be-.
the
the

Part of the responsibility, Prof.
Trow added, rests in our ignorance
of the real demands of Communist
imperialism.
He suggested that a solution
might lie in having people get to-
gether .in the manner of UNESCO
groups and discuss,the problem in
.order to gain an understanding of

Very Personal
A flick a tthe tick
keeps you dainty aN day!

.}:tiff :et
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