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October 10, 1950 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-10-10

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Ti!!DAY, OCTOBER 10, 1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Army

Leads

Nation's

Grid Poll

12

BENNIE'S PRESCRIPTION:
Speed Provides Tonic for Wolverines

Michigan In 18th Spot
As Irish Plunge to Tenth

* * *

By TED PAPES
Chuck Ortmann had good rea-
sons for his enthusiasm along the
sdelines at Michigan Stadium
Saturday.
Responding to his shouts of en-
couragement, his teammates pull-
ed themselves out from under an
early Dartmouth lead to log their
first victory of the 1950 football
campaign.
A HASTY analysis of that game
might indicate that all the storm
crowds which hovered over the
Wolverines in their opening con-
test have been blown away.
In reality there is a mixture
of. good and bad indications hid-
den in Saturday's action.
On the asset side, Michigan
came up with that extra step of
speed that can make a champion,
an element which has been miss-
ing since 1948.
LOWELL PERRY and Leo Ko-
ceski touched off the fuse that
sparked both passing and running
attacks to produce the first su-
stained long-range offensive in
three years.
Perry skyrocketed out of his
KEEP A-HEAD
OF YOUR HAIR

end position to catch a Bill Pu-
tich aerial good for 47 yards and
a touchdown at 13:22 of the
second period. Koceski had al-
ready salvaged something out
of the first quarter by clicking
on his favorite reverse off left
tackle in a 34 yard scoring tactic.
The Koceski play demonstrated
near-perfect blocking an the part
of Michigan in general, and end
Fred Pickard in particular as he
spilled the defensive line backer,
springing Leo into the open.
* * *
HARRY ALLIS joined the speed
fraternity when he outran the In-
dian secondary and safety man
for another 47 yard payoff on aj
third quarter pass from Don Peter-
son.
The aforementioned Putich,
playing his second complete
game, added considerable polish
to his field generalship, and pro-
mises to reward the confidence
of4iis coach, Bennie Oosterbaan.
He was supported adequately by
Pete Palmer who took his place
in the game's closing minutes.
DEFENSIVELY, Perry again
gets the plaudits for his sharp
maneuvers out of the Wolverine
safety slot. His cat-like alertness
on pass defense paid off with three
key interceptions of tosses from
Johnny Clayton.
Clayton had some other trou-
bles all afternoon as Ozzie Clark
stalked him from his defensive
right end position. Clark more
than made up for a passing bob-
ble with his flank work.
The charging Michigan line kept

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
CHUCK ORTMANN
... let's go Blue!
* *
getting progressively closer to a
block of a Dartmouth punt, cul-
minating finally in Momsen's third
period success which set up the
fourth and last Wolverine touch-
down.
THERE WAS nothing to cheer
about in Michigan's first quarter
play, however. The team started
extremely slowly with erratic ball
handling and blocking.

Crew-cuts Flat Tops
New Yorker

1

9 Hairstylists - No Waiting
DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty near State

.

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Clayton riddled Oosterbaan's
pass defense in the early stages
but was handicapped by the in-
aptitude of his receivers. A pot-
ent 'T' formation offense like
Army's is dangerous in the short
pass- area.
Rain and wet grounds slowed the
usual light Monday workout yes-
terday as the varsity held a skull
session to discuss Saturday's mis-
takes.
Don Dufek's injury turned out
to be a pulled leg muscle and he
should be ready for the Cadets.
So should Al Wahl and Tom John-
son who were shaken up by Dart-
mouth.
Ortmann remains the chief
cause of concern,. with all eyes
focussed on the progress he is
making with his bad ankle. Oos-
terbaan is planning to' inject his
ace into the lineup sometime this
week.

By The Associated Press
Army's Black Knights took over
the No. 1 spot among the nation's
college football teams yesterday as
Notre Dame dropped, to tenth
place, its lowest position in the
memory of the younger generation.1
Purdue's upset of the Fighting
Irish, 28-14, last Saturday, shook4
up the football ratings like an
earthquake. There were other form
reversals on "Black Saturday," in-
cluding Maryland's 34-7 thump-f
ing of Michigan, State.l
When the debris had cleared
away, the pigskin experts from
coast to coast had to start from
scratch in figuring their top ten
teams. Today the Irish received
.only one first place nomination.
Notre Dame has finished no lower
than ninth since 1941. -
MICHIGAN'S Wolverines, who
bounced back to beat Dartmouth,
27-7, after losing their opening
game to Michigan State, advanced
a notch to eighteenth place from
the nineteenth placing of last
week.
However, the Mazie and Blue
Classes Stop
While ]Purdue
Honors Team
LAFAYETTE, In d.-(P)-Pur-
due officials tried-not very hard1
and with no success whatever-to
promote "education as usual" yes-
terday on the campus that pro-
duced the first conqueror of Notre
Dame's football team since 1945.
But, the no-celebrating idea was
a lost cause from the time the first
underclassmen came whooping out
of his dormitory this morning.
PRESIDENT Frederick L. Hov-
de, himself a former quarterback
at Minnesota, took one look at
7,000 screaming students packed
into the Hall of Music and gave
unofficial approval to the holiday.
"Officially," Hovde said, "the
University is in session. Unof-
ficially, it is yours!"
Emotion was so intense in the
spontaneous celebration t h a t
Coach Stuart I. Holcomb broke
all precedent eand promised that
his team will win another game-
from Iowa Oct. 21.
"ABOUT THIE BIG TEN race,"
Holcomb said, "I still don't know
how good the boys are. Wining
the conference championship is
quite an assignment. We'll take
the games one at a time. But I
promise we'll beat Iowa in the
first one if it's the last thing we
ever do!"
In a calmer moment, the Pur-
due coach had said everybody
would be gunning for his team
and it might lose the rest of its
games this season. But the jubi-
lant students didn't want to hear
that kind of talk.
Holcomb told the crowd he hesi-
tated to single out' any one Pur-
due player as the herd of the
Notre Dame game, but he intro-
duced fullback Don Kasperan as
"the boy who was as responsible
for the victory as anybody."

are still behind three Big Ten
teams--Purdue, Ohio State and
Wisconsin-in the ranking.
Army, with an unbeaten string
of 22 games, vaulted from fourth
to first. The West Pointers re-
ceived a total of 2,101 points by
a national panel of 241 sports
writers and sportscasters. They
were named first on 115 ballots.
Southern Methodist's air-mind-
ed Mustangs moved into second
place followed by: 3-Oklahoma, 4-
Texas, 5-Kentucky, 6-Stanford,
7-California, 8-Maryland, 9-Pur-
due and 10-Notre Dame.
* * *
MICHIGAN STATE dropped all
the way from second to 20th. But
the Spartans still have the memory
of that win over Michigan to keep
them happy.
Up until this week, Purdue
and Maryland were strictly also
rans. The Boilermakers had
been beaten by a fine Texas
team, 34-26, and Maryland,
highly touted before the season,
had been shellatked by Georgia,
27-7.
A week ago the first ten teams
were the following: 1-Notre Dame,
2-Michigan State, 3-Southern
Methodist, 4-Army, 5-Oklahoma,
6-Kentucky, 7-Texas, 8-Stanford,
9-California and 10-Washington.
The top teams (number in
brackets is first place votes; points
figured on a basis of 10 for first, 9
for second, etc.):
TOP TEN
1. Army (115) 2,101
2. Southern Methodist
(53) 1,990
3. Oklahoma (29) 1,387
4. Texas (9) 1,212
5. Kentucky (11) 837
6. Stanford (4) 765
7. California (2) 754
8. Maryland (8) 684
9. Purdue (1) 616
10. Notre Dame (1) 554
SECOND TEN: 11-Washing-
ton (2) 444; 12-Ohio State 254;
13-Clemson (4) 211;'14-Tennes-
see 205; 15-Rice (1) 178; 16-
Wisconsin 178; 17-Cornell (2)
174; 18-MICHIGAN 164; 19-
Vanderbilt 142; 20-Michigan
State 101

Giving indications of 1951-52
potentialities, 14 Wolverine sopho-
mores saw action in last weekend's
27-7 win over Dartmouth.
It was the first appearance in
the Michigan Stadium for eleven
of the rookies, with Lowell Perry,
Rog Zatkoff and Frank Howell
now ranking as two-game vete-
rans.
s s s
PERRY, who operates off the
left flank offensively, and fills in
the safety slot on defense, was
easily the standout player in the
game.
Intercepting three Dartmouth
passes and scoring what proved
to be Michigan's winning touch-
down, he provided the Maize and
Blue grid machine with the
spark it needs for an explosive
punch.
In the entire 1949 campaign,
only two of Dartmouth quarter-
back's John Clayton's passes were
intercepted and in the 1950 opener
against Holy Cross, he lost the ball
only once on a pass-play. Perry in-
dividually duplicated the figure
with his three strategic snags.
The Michigan defense, which
for the most part included the
160-pound Howell at defensive
halfback, stopped Clayton with a
total of five interceptions, Leo Ko-
ceski and Pete Palmer each grab-
bing one.
* * *
FOR A PORTION of the final
period, Michigan coach Bennie
Oosterbaan fielded a defensive
secondary composed entirely of
sophomores.
In front of Perry were Howell
I-M Scores
RESIDENCE HALL SCORES
Fletcher 12, Williams 0
Lloyd 0, Hinsdale 0
Greene 13, Allen Rumsey 0
Anderson 12, Adams 0
Cooley 19, Wenley 0
Strauss defeated Chic ago
(forfeit)
Prescott 13, Winchell 6
PROFESSIONAL FRATERNITIES
Phi Delta Chi defeated Alpha
Omega (forfeit)
Psi Omega 7, Delta Sigma
Delta 2

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60

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