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October 08, 1950 - Image 9

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-10-08

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OUNDAY, OMOBER. 9, 1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE EMER

SUNT)AY, OCTOBER 8, 1950 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE
I ~ -- ~

What's Up
In the Dorms

TOWARD ONE WORLD:
Significant New Studies
Of World Unity Possible

Editors Note: Any contributions
to "What's Up in the Dorms"
should be given to Jane Elzey at
the Daily or at 9319.)
* * *
Dances and mixers monopolized
the social calendar during orienta-
tion week this fall, as both fresh-
men and upperclassmen drowned
their registration blues and took a
last minute fling before the be-
ginning of classes.
* * *
THEFIRST day of registration
was the date for Jordan Hall's
mixer dance with Lloyd House.
With a couple of days in between
to re-form their stagline, these
'ame men were entertained by
Betsy Barbour on Saturday, Sep-
tember 23.
Newberry and Barbour, it
seems, have kindled a new spark
of rivalry. On September 23 the
men of Winchell House of the
West Quad were special guests
at a Newberry dance and just a
weeklater, went across the lawn
to Barbour for another mixer.
Stockwell has introduced a new
idea in exchange dinners, and take
care, men, it leaves you out! Last
Thursday evening adjacent corri-
dors carried out the exchange
theme-"dates" were those having
twin room numbers on the two
corridors.
The same evening, going on the
old addge that "good eating" is
the way to a man's heart, Mosher
Halland Hinsdale of East Quad
traded quests for the evening din-
ner.
NO FOOTBALL season would be
complete without the traditional
open houses after the games. A
miniature gridiron and goalposts
in the University and State colors
were featured on the refreshment
table last Saturday as Jordan wo-
men entertained their after-the-
game guests. Newberry and Bar-
bour are also included on the list
of those having open-house teas
following the State game.
The freshman class of the house
will be feted by Barbour next
Thursday evening, when they will
be guests at a welcome dinner gi-
yen in their honor.
'Ensian Photo.
Pointers Given
'Ensian sales manager, Bill Os-
terman,'51, recently offered a few
words of advice to picture sitters.
Osterman warned seniors and
graduates to come for their ap-
pointments on time. "Otherwise
you may have to wait," he said.
He als.emphasized the need for
chepkngstubs so that unnecessary
tripsvto the Student Publications
Bldg, would not be made.
"Since proofs will be mailed 48
hours after the sittings," he con-
tinued, "it's advisable to return
thermas soon as possible."
"Tk4s year senior and graduate
pictures will be separated into two
sections, because these poses are
as Miuich for the grads as for the
seniors."
Eight poses will be taken, and
of these, two may be in caps and
gowns. "Parents like them," Os-
terman added. Appointments may
still be made in the Student Pub-
lications Bldg., 420 Maynard, or
by phoning 2-3241.

By VERNON EMERSON
New studies of great significance'
for hastening the day of world
unity can be underway in six'
months, according to Prof. Robert
C. Angell who recently completed
a year as director of UNESCO's
social science division.
Prof. Angell, who has headed the
sociology depai ament- for the past
decade, admitted that the split
between the West and Russia is
so deep that any research on world
integration may seem futile.
* * .*
"OF COURSE social science has
no magic way to make the people
of the world resolve their differ-
*. * *

"We are beginning to work on
these plans here and much in-
vestigation has been conducted
by UNESCO," Prof. Angell said.
He declared that UNESCO and
other branches of the UN are
progressing steadily. The fric-
tions that come from much cul-
ture differences are being over-
come and work is moving ahead
more easily.
In fact, some cultural investiga-
tions are going on now behind the
Iron Curtain, he noted.
The sociologist hailed such re-
search organizations as the Phoe-
nix Project and fund granting in-
stitutions as the Ford Foundation
as lending great hope for a new
large scale studies of world prob-
lems.

A NEWS
ARRIVAL

StTOR

i

SWING LOW

PROF. ANGELL
* * *
ences;" he said. "But the prin-
ciples we discover can be utilized
for reaching this objective more
effectively."
He pointed out that the signi-
ficant reason for immediate re-
search on a large scale is that
many people in all countries long
for peace and security.
"It's not true that they long for
peace on any terms, but most of
them are quite willing to live and
let live," the veteran socioligist
said.
* * *
BY ATTEMPTING to bridge
existing gaps in cultures now, Prof.
Angell noted, social scientists can
make a guiding contribution to the
coming world order. But all of the
gaps do not have to be filled up,
he added.
Prof. Angell, who has worked on
the probtm of social integration
for some 18 years, remarked that
if world integration goes ahead
within the Soviet bloc, in time the
Russians may be forced to partici-
pate in the "live and let live" sys-
tem.
PROF. ANGELL'S plans for an
evolution toward one world in-
clude making the world's populace
realize the urgent need for a global
moral order; setting up studies on
world federation processes and
conducting research in existing
international governmental and
non-governmental machinery.
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