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October 07, 1950 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAC-!.

'hils Again Ier in Clutch As

Yankees

Whin, 3-2

* * * N

* * *

7

oleman Proves Punch
'orRampagingN.Y.

Gridmen Favored Over Green

Coleman's Single Wains
Game; Ford Hurls Today

* * 4

*YORK-(A)-The slug-
Oero of this run-starved
*a handsome, slender, cur-
i4 boy with a fetching grin
seaon's batting average of
37 .
t Gerry Coleman, a defen-
iwark at second base but
r ounted a Yankee slugger
de Joe DiMaggio, John
r Yogi Berra.
'OUGIT the team was go-
'wn," he said today after
th-inning single had broken
*. * *

batted in the first run and the all-
important third one.
The pitch that he hit to do the
damage in the ninth, he said, "was
a high curve on the inside."
* * *
"FIRST Russ Meyer threw me a
slider for a strike. Then he threw
me a high curve for a ball, so I
decided I better start swinging."
And he did-on the next pitch.
The big crowd in Yankee Stad-
ium went wild, and even the
Yankee players were laughing
and jubilant as they streaked up
the runway from their dugout
into their luxurious dressing
room.
After the Yankee team was lock-
ed securely in its dressing room
for the seclusion which Commis-
sioner A. B. Chandler promised
immediately after each game, you
could hear shouts coming out:
"Gerry Coleman wins - Gerry
Coleman wins."
THE YANKEES are excited now.
They were apathetic after the first
victory, interested after their sec-
ond, and now they are all pepped
up.
"It really feels wonderful,"
said Coleman. "It looks like we
really ought to win the Series."
That seemed at the moment to
be putting it mildly,
Joe DiMaggio, whose home run
won yesterday's game, leaned over
the group clustered around Cole-
man.
"I wanna hear what this junk
sounds like," he said, and every-
one laughed.
** * *
"HOW DOES IT feel to be a big
slugger?" someone asked Coleman.
"Oh, shucks," he said, "We
haven't scored very many runs.
I drove in four in the series last
year but I wasn't exactly what
you'd call a big slugger."
Ed Lopat, the crafty lefthanded
pitcher who pitched the first eight
innings, said he "felt pretty good,
-but I made the wrong pitch at
the right time - and what the
hell."
He referred to the single that
Mike Goliat got in the seventh to
put the Phillies ahead 2-1.
Tom Ferrick, a big sandy haired
fellow who came in to relieve Lo-
pat and got credit for the victory,
took plenty of back-pounding, too.
His is a rags-to-riches story. He
was traded to the Yankees by the
St. Louis Browns, and went from
the second division to a prominent
role in the World Series efforts of
the champions.
As for Manager Casey Stengel
of the Yankees, he managed al-
most to smile but he was far from
exultant.

(Continued from Page 1)
of Putich being shifted to the left
half slot in place of Don Peterson.
IF THAT is done, Pete Palmer
will take over the quarterback du-
ties. Otherwise Peterson will team
up with Leo Koceski at right half
and the driving Don Dufek at full.
There is expected to be little
change in Michigan's line. Ozzie
Clark and Harry Allis get the de-
fensive end chores, with Frank
Picard and Lowell Perry the of-
fensive duties.
John Hess, Captain Al Wahl,
Roger Zatkoff, and Tom Johnson
will share the tackle assignments
and Tom Kelsey, Pete Kinyon,
Dick McWilliams, and Al Jack-
son will alternate at guard. John
Padjen aiad Tony Momsen will
handle the offensive and defensive
center positions respectively.
* * *
OOSTERBAAN will also call on
Frank Howell, a sophomore, for
duty at right half offensively and
also for protection against Clay-
njun Records
Dartmouth's 1949 football team
as well as several of its individual
members set a host of new team
records.

I

ton's passes. Howell was injured
slightly in Saturday's game, but
is expected to be ready for today's
action.
Dartmouth's forward wall will
be led by their captain and cen-
ter Paul Stanley. Stanley is a 185
pounder who plays both offense
and defense and is a veteran of
two years experience.
Flanking him will be Dick Price
and Joe Morelli at guard, Ted Eb-
erle and Charles Bailey at tackle,
and John McDonald and Vincent
Marriott at the ends.
AGAINST Holy Cross last week
Dartmouth put on a tremendous
second period spurt to tie the Cru-
saders. After Holy Cross had piled
up 245 yards in the first half, the
Indians roared back after the in-
termission to finally gain a sta-
tisical edge.
Roberts did a large share of
the ground gaining, piling up
100 yards in 22 rushes. In all the
Indians rolled up 228 yards by
the overland route to go with
Clayton's 105 markers through
the air.
Dartmouth has seen little action
against Western Conference com-
petition. They whipped Chicago
33-7 in 1925 and lost to the same
school, 39-0 in 1933. The only other
contest resulted in a 27-6 shel-
lacking by Northwestern in 1927.
* **U
,THE LINEUPS

TONY MOMSEN
* * * right cross

/4e

* S S

One More?

WURBA CHURCH
..lat whiz hope
. ir4 gme -of the series,
i6tThgk I'd be that in-
ital i iR:R yictory."
that's the way he talks,
g all the time. And look-
we as if he belonged on a
team-.than on the Tan-,
as.now batted in three of
runs the Yankees have
i three games. He brought
winning and only run in
itgame with a long fly to
Id. He scored the first run
second game, and today he
ag Consoles
flies' Hlamner
)aggio and Gran Hamner
the tunnel leading to the
%.,after the game. Hamner,
eling low over his error
cabled the Yanks to score
itg tun in the eighth, was
g his head in grief. Joe put
Ma around the youngster's
s And tried to sooth his
l.
It terrible for the kid," Joe
Eo looked so forlorn."

ROG ZATKOFF
* * * left hook
Big Ten Opens
Season; 111ini
Face Badgers
Intersectional battles and the
opening of the Big Ten's 1950 con-
ference season highlight today's
football encounters throughout
the nation.
In big games today, Pennsyl-
vania will face the California Gol-
den, Bears, while a once-beaten
Maryland outfit will attempt to
live up to its pre-season notices,
meeting the Spartans of Michi-
gan State.
* * *
NOTRE DAME, unbeaten in its
last 39 outings, will face a deter-
mined Purdue team, though the
Irish should win handily. Stan-
ford, considered a West Coast
power this year, meets Oregon
State.
Army plays a so-so Penn
State team which ripped
Georgetown, 34-14, last week,
but the Cadets are big favorites.
Oklahoma, with a winning
streak of 22 games meets a good
Texas A. & M. team, and
S.M.U.'s Mustangs face Missouri.
In another top game in the far
West, a dark-horse Washington
eleven, fresh from an easy 28-13
triumph over Minnesota, will take
the field against U.C.L.A. in a
game which may go either way.
TURNING TO the Big Ten, two
conference games are scheduled.
The Wisconsin Badgerswill face
Illinois at Champaign. The Illini,
with first-string quarterback Don
Engels out of action for the year
with a broken hip, will rely on a
strong running game.
Johnny Karras, Ronnie Clark,
Sam Piazza, and Dick Raklo-
vitz will bear the brunt of the
ball-carrying for Illinois, while
the Badgers will rely on the ac-
curate right arm of Bob Petrus-
ka to carry them to victory.
Iowa plays Indiana in the other
Western Conference game. The
Hawkeyes showed unusual power
last week as they rolled over Sou-
thern California, and the Hoosiers
will be hard-pressed to stop the
drives of Jerry Faske and Bill
Reichardt.
* * *
NON-CONFERENCE games pit
Michigan against Dartmouth,
Pittsburgh against Ohio State,
Northwestern and Navy, and Ne-
braska faces its second Big Ten
opponent in a row-Minnesota.
Lesser games feature Alabama
and Vanderbilt, Arkansas and
T.C.U., Columbia and Harvard,
Cornell and Syracuse, and Georgia
against North Carolina.

Waitkus lb
Ashburn cf
Jones 3b
Ennis rf
Sisler If
Mayo If
Hamner ss
Seminick c
Goliat 2b
c-Caballero
Bloodworth 2b
Heintzelman p
Konstanty p
b-Whitman
Meyer p
TOTALS

AB
5
4
3
4
4
0
4
2
3
0
0
2
0
1
0
32

R
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2

H
1
1
1
1
1
0.
3
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
10

0
8
0
1
3
2
1
2
5
4
04
a1
0
0
0
0
a26

A
0
0
2
0
1
0
2
0
1
0
0
2
0
0
0
8

Quarterback Johnny Clayton
completed 56% of his passes, for
a total of 813 yards, both new
marks. End Tom Rowe, gone from
this year's team, caught 36
passes for 478 yards, also new
team records. -
Bill Roberts, star Indian run-
ning back this season averaged
5.5 yards per try, gaining 700
}ards in 125 carries. Roberts, from
Dubuque, Iowa, Clayton, and
Rowe paced the Ivy League in
their respective departments.

PHILADELPHIA

DARTMOUTH a
Marriott ..... LE
Eberle....... LT
Price ........ LG
Staley ....... . C
Morelli ...... RG
Bailey .......RT
McDonald ... RE
Clayton......QB
Curtis ....... LH
Reich ....... RH
Roberts ...... FB

MICHIGAN
.........Clark
........ Hess
...... Kinyon
...... Padjen
.......Kelsey
........ Wahl
........ Allis
........Putich
..... Peterson
..... Koceski
....... Dufek

By GAYLE TALBOT
NEW YORK-(W)-The New
York Yankees defeated the Phila-
delphia Phillies for the third
straight time yesterday, 3 to 2, and1
broke the hearts of the Whiz Kids
in the process. -
The American League cham-
pions shoved across the tying runr
in the eighth on a glaring error
by Granny Hamner, Phil short-
stop, and scored the winning run
after two were out in the ninth
on a hit into centerfield by Gerry;
Coleman with two on base.
THIS WAS the seventh straight,
one-run defeat suffered by the;
Phillies in World Series play dat-
ing back to 1915, and it probably
was the toughest of the lot to lose.
It will take stout hearts for Eddie
Sawyer's youngsters even to show
up for the fourth game in the Sta-
dium tomorrow.
For the third time since the
,series opened in Philadelphia,
the National Leaguers received
brilliant pitching. They outhit
the Bombers by 10 to 7, and they
went into the final two innings
nursing an apparently safe 2-1
lead as their 34-year-old south-
paw, Ken Heintzelman, mowed
down the fearsome Yanks like
winter wheat.
But then, even as "the great
crowd of 64,505 was cheering them
on to victory in hopes of extend-
ing the play-off to at least five
games, both Heintzelman and his
support succumbed to the pres-
sure. It was a doleful climax to
what had been a fine, tight base-
ball game.
Heintzelman had yielded only
four hits and had retired the first
two Yanks in the last of the eighth
when it began to happen. The vet-
eran southpaw suddenly lost his
control completely and walked
Coleman, Larry Berra, and Joe
DiMaggio in succession to load the
bases, with the tying run on third.
* *A *
JIM KONSTANTY, who lost the
first game to the Yanks, came in
from the bullpen to make his 75th
relief appearance of the year. He
faced Bobby Brown, pinch-hitting
for Hank Bauer. After fouling off
a pair, Brown sent a simple roller
down to Hanmner, who has been
called by some as fine a shortstop
as there is in the game today.
The Whiz Kid picked up the
ball, then dropped it, and by the
time he had recovered the pellet
it was too late to make a force
play at second and Coleman had
crossed the plate. Johnny Mize
then popped foul back of third
to end the inning.
Came the last of the ninth, and
Russ Meyer, the third Phillies'
pitcher, likewise retired the first
two Yanks, fanning Cliff Mapes
for the second out. It looked like
another extra-inning tussle when
Gene Woodling, who had hit for
the Yankee pitcher, Eddie Lopat;
came to bat.
He rapped one down to Jimmy

Bloodworth, who had taken ov
second base for the Phils to star
the inning. The veteran bobble
the ball a second and got off
hurried, wide throw as Woodlin
sped across the bag. The offiels
scorers ruled it a hit, not bein
certain that a perfect play woul
have nipped the Yank.
THEN CAME little Phil Rizzutd
and he slammed one just totU
right of second which Bloodwort
divednat and knocked down br
couldn't hold. Woodling slid i4
safely as the ball rolled arour
* * .*

a-Two out when winning run
scored
b-Hit into fielder's choice for
Konstanty in 9th
c-Ran for Goliat in 9th

FUTURE GREATS?
Freshman Squad Shows
Much Defensive Promise

NEW YORK
Rizzuto ss
Coleman 2b
Berra e
DiMaggio cf
Bauer If
d-Brown
e-Jensen
Ferrick p
Mize lb
Collins lb
Johnson 3b
Mapes rf
Lopat p
Woodling If
TOTALS

AB
3
4
2
3
3
1
0
0
4
0
4
4
2
2
32

R
1
1
0
41
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
3

H
1
3
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
I

O
1
3
6
1
1
0
0
0
9
1
1
3
1
0
27

A
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
1
3
0
4
0
13,

WHITEY FORD
* * In Phils Future
the bag. That brought up t'
youthful Coleman, batting hero
the series, asnd he slammed a s
gle into left-center field to wl
the game.
Whitey Ford, the Yankees' 23
year-old rookie southpaw sens!
iton will attempt to wrap up tl
series tomorrow. The youngst
won nine games and lost only o,
after joining the Yanks from thc
Kansas City farm early in Jul
He possesses remarkable conti
and unusual poise for a player .;
young.
For the Phillies it was to bec d
ther Bob Miller (11-6) or .Bub'
Church (8-6) both freshmi '
righthanders. By this time, ,SaN.
yer probably is wondering wh,.
sort of pitching was required t
win a game from the Bombers: It;
a fair question, at that.

---;~ 1

We carry a full line of
OSHER DELICATESSEN

SALAMI CORNED BEEF

PASTRAMER

WEINERS

SMOKED FISH

By LARRY SPERLING v
Freshman football moved into
full swing this week as Coach!
Wally Weber put his boys through
offensive and defensive drills.
Though it is hard to drawi any
conclusions at this early date most
observers agree that this year's'
squad will be strong defensively
but not up to par on the offense.
* * *
THIS WEAKNESS on the of-
fense is particularly significant in
view of the fact that a large
chunk of the varsity's offensive
backfield is graduating after this
season.
New backfield material will be
necessary to help fill the gap which
will be made by the loss of Ort-
mann, Dufek and Koceski.
The importance to the varsity
of the men moving up from the
freshman squad each year can
be readily seen by a glance at
the key part which some of the
stars from last season's fresh-
man team are playing in the
Wolverines' 1950 array..
Rog Zatkoff fresh from the
frosh ranks has taken over the
post of line backer which was left
vacant when Dick Kempthorn
graduated. Despite the fact that
it was his first game against big
time competition Zatkoff gave a
very good account of himself.
PROMINENT in the defensive
backfield also is Frank Howell. He
is an excellent example of how the
freshman prospects are versed in
all aspects of the Michigan system.
Originally known as mainly
an offensive threat, Howell was
well prepared to step into a key
position in the Wolverines' pass
defense which was considerably
weakened by the loss of Wally
Teninga and Charley Lentz.
Last season's lack of good pass
catching receivers was greatly al-
leviated by Lowell Perry's moving
up from the frosh squad. This

glue fingered end is also playing a
large part in the pass defending
set-up.
,, * *
ON THE LINE last year's
freshmen team will be strongly
represented by Dick Strozewski.
Though he did not see action last
week because of an injury his
presence is expected to be felt by
Michigan's opposition for the re-
mainder of the season.
Another ex-freshman star
may be vaulted into prominence
in today's game if Charley Ort-
mann's injury keeps him ou't of
the starting line-up. He is Dave
Hill who has been alternating
with Don Peterson at Ortmann's
tailback slot during this week's
practices.
Other sophomores who are do-
ing well on the varsity are quarter-
back Ted Topor, lineman Bob
Timm, and Bill Billings, a punting
specialist.
*
WALLY WEBER, who as coach
of the Freshman team handled all
of the aforementioned men, ex-
pressed the opinion that they will
develop into very valuable men in
the Michigan football picture.
"Most of these men have the
potential," asserted Coach
Weber. "All they need now is
experience which can only be
acquired by playing against the
top grade competition which
Michigan faces."
"It's too bad, he added, "that
some of these fellows had to be
called upon to playesuch an impor-
tant role in their very first game.
It would have been better if they
could have been broken into the
starting line-up .more slowly."

d-Safe on error for Bauer in 8th
e-Ran for Brown in 8th
Philadelphia (N) 000 001 100-2
New York (A) 001000 011-3
E-Seminick, Hamner, RBI-
Coleman 2, Sisler, Goliat. 2B-
Ennis, Hamner. SB-Rizzuto. S-
Seminick 2, Heintzelman,
Jones. DP-Hamner and Wait-
kus. Left-Philadelphia 8; New
York 9. BB-Heintzelman 6
(Rizzuto 2, Berra 2, Coleman,
DliMaggio) ; Ferrick 1- (Goliat).
SO-Lopat 5 (Ashburn 3, Semi-
nick, Jones); Meyer 1 (Mapes);
Heintzelman 3 (Johnson 2, Lo-
pat). HO-Lopat 9 in 8 innings;
Heintzelman 4 in 7 2/3; Kon-
stanty 0 in i; Meyer 3 in 2/3;
Ferrick 1 in 1. Winner-Ferrick.
Loser-Meyer. U-Dusty Boggess
(NL) plate; Charlie Berry (AL)
first base; Jocko Conlan (NL)
second base; Bill McGowan
i(AL) third base; Al Barlick
(NL) 'left field foul line; Bill
McKinley (AL) right field foul
line. T-2:35. A-64,505. Receipts-
$309,049.35.
OPTICAL SERVICE
CAMPUS OPTICIANS
222 Nickels Arcade
Phone 2-91 16

The Undergraduate
"M" CLUB
will be selling souvenir
Maize and Blue
CUSHION SEATS
At the game today
selling for only
$1.00
.Don't miss this chance
to enjoy the game in comfort.

U,

I
I.

.r-
1

l FRESH DAILY
BREAD; BAGELS, ROLLS

l

I

the finest in
MEATS..e.GROCERIES
FRESH and FROZEN VEGETABLES
' carry a full line of PEPPERIDGE Bread and Rolls
Open Sunday 10 A.M. - 1 P.M. Daily 8 - 6
FRATERNITY MARKET

G
R
A
D
U
A
T
E
S

s
E
N
I
O
H
S

I.

S0 S.uth University

Phone 2-1791

11

i

CORRECTO
The ad appearing on last Wednesday
for, the PARROT should have read

e Wie!

PICTURES!

AVOID

TROUBLE

LUNCH & C
LUNCH & C

6 DAYS A WEEK
INNER 00
5 DAYS A WEEK
)INNER .'oo

This is a wise bird watching
you. Hove you moved? Be
smart. Avoid complications.
Register your change of ad-
dress at the Ann Arbor Bank.

PICTURES!
Make that
Appointment NOW!
For your convenience:
Phone 2-32-41

11

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