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September 30, 1949 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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FrID, Ay, SEPTEM1MER 30, 1949

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STILL REGULATED:
Private Room Rentals
Show No Rate Increase

ALMOST PAINLESS:
Dental Clinic Remodeled for Efficiency

V

Rents for students rooms in pri-
vate homes apparently have not
increased since the end of the
spring term, according to Mrs.
Esther C. Griffin of the Office of
Student Affairs.
"Students pay from $6 to $8 a
week for single or double rooms in
hnost homes," Mrs. Griffin said.
THIS FIGURE HAS remained
about the same since the end of
the war, but reflects a substantial
increase over pre-war rents.
College students who rent
Fields Film Show.
"The Bank Dick" and "Never
Give A Sucker An Even Break,"
laugh-provoking W. C. Fields com-
edies, will be shown as a twin bill
at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow and Satur-
day at Hill Auditorium.
Tickets for the films which are
sponsored by the Intercooperative
Council may be purchased from 2
p.m. to showtime at Hill Audito-
rium.
YOUR HAIR IS OUR CARE!
We'llblend and style your hair to
please you!!
The DASCOLA BARBERS
iberty near State

apartments or live in rooming
houses in Ann Arbor and Ypsi-
lanti still have the protection of
rent control against overcharges
and unauthorized eviction, ac-
cording to a recent announce-
ment by Area Rent Director Wil-
liam C. Haines.
"Every student who rents a room
or apartment subject to rent con-
trol is entitled to see the registra-
tion statement on that particular
rental unit," Haines said.
* * *
THIS STATEMENT tells how
much the landlord is authorized to
charge for the accommodations,
and the services to be provided in
return for the rent.
Should the owner be unable to
produce the registration form,
the information it contains may
be secured from the Office of
the Housing Expediter, 250 West'
Lafayette Avenue, Detroit.
Haines said that higher rent for
a room over last spring's figure
may be legal, since some increases
have been granted where the own-
ers, costs have increased, where
rents have been below those for
comparable accommodations and
where certain improvements have
been made.

A near-perfect environment for
students and faculty in the dental
school's rehabilitated operative
clinic makes it "one of the most
efficient teaching clinics in the
world."
, According to Dr. Russell W.
Bunting, dean of the School of
Dentistry, the remodeled clinic
cost more than $300,000.
* * *
NINETY-FOUR new operating
units-complete with motor-driv-
en chairs, adequate drawer and
storage space, excellent illumina-
tion and work bench space-have
been installed.
They supplant the units in-
stalled when the original build-
ing was constructed in 1907 and
later enlarged in 1923, Dr. Bunt-

ing explained. Of the original
units, 39 remain for use by den-
tal hygienists.
The newv equipment, of latest de-
sign, was developed by Dr. Paul H.
Jesserich, director of I he W. K.
Kellogg Foundation Institute, and
his staff.
TWO STUDENTS can now work
at a chair, Dr. Bunting said, mak-
ing it possible to accommodate
both the junior and senior dental
classes.
"The old clinic was unable to
supply the increased number of
students," he pointed out. "The
remodeled clinic is designed for
use by junior and senior stu-
dents on alternate days employ-
ing operative procedures."

The new clinic, which last year
in its unremodeled state examined
3,927 patients, is now ready for
full use. However, Dr. Bunting
added that it will be unable to in-
crease the number of patients.
Welcomes back bth
Old and New patrons at
his new location,
1209 South University,
opposite the parking lot.
Lyons Barber Shop
1209 South University

,,

Read and Use Daily Classified Ads

-Daily-Alex Lnanian
SQUAD GETS BIG GIFT-Dave Lake, '49E, hea I cheer leader on the University Cheerleading
Squad accepts the keys to the Squad's new car fr .m the local car merchant who donated it. Testing
the strength of the roof and fender are four tumblers from the squad.
* * A * * * * * *
Cheerleaders Carrj, on 'U' Tradition
V1
BBTBRCBTSGT VOR l R EEO

. ... ......
------ -------

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Cheerleading has been an insti-
tution at Michigan since the days
of Fielding H. Yost's point-a-min-
ute teams.
One of the first teams organ-
ized in the Midwest, the early
cheerleaders won nation - wide
fame in 1917 when they introduced
the "Michigan Locomotive" cheer,
now imitated by colleges and uni-
versities all over the country.
Clevelanders
Organize New
Campus Club
Joining the ranks of the To-
ledo, St. Louis, and Texas Clubs,
the Cleveland Club is the latest
regional organization to take its
place on the University map.
Organized late last spring by
Neal Traves, '51, and Lois Eisele,
'51, the club held several meetings
during the summer in Cleveland,
including a party in the Metro-
politan Valley.
THE CLUB AIMS to bring to-
gether socially the more than 200
University students and alumnae
in Greater Cleveland, according to
Traves. Students who are close
enough to Cleveland to keep in
contact with the club between se-
mesters are also welcome to join,
he pointed out.
Several parties both in Ann
Arbor and in Cleveland are be-
ing planned by the club, includ-
ing a big Christmas dance to
bring together students and
alumnae. The club also hopes to
- devise a system of rides between
Cleveland and Ann Arbor.
The first meeting for the fall
semester will be held at 7:30 p.m.,
Oct. 20, in the League.

TRADITIONALLY an all-male
squad of seven men, the cheer-
leading team was almost discon-
tinued during the war because of
the shortage of men. In 1946, how-
ever, a whole new squad of cheer-
leaders, headed by Bill McGowan,
Grad., was trained by Newt Loken,
gymnastics coach.
Since Loken drew much of
his material from his gymnas-
tics team, he soon instigated the
tumbling routines which have
become a colorful feature of
Michigan's home games for the
last three years.
Heading this year's squad, which
is still being recruited and trained
daily at the IM Building, will be
Dave Lake, '49E. Faced with the
terrific job of leading a student
cheering section of more than
International
Fete .Planned
Foreign Students
To Be Honored Guests
A reception for newly arrived
students from other lands will be
held at 8 p.m. tomorrow in the
Rackham Assembly Hall according
to RoberttB.rKlinger, assistant
counselor to foreign sti~ens.
The students will be met by
President Alexander G. Ruthven
and the Board of Governors of
International Center. Counselor
Esson M. Gale and his staff, fac-
ulty members, townspeople and
old students will also be there.
At 7:30 p.m. preceding the re-
ception, Dean Hayward Keniston
of the Literary College will deliver
a welcome address on behalf of
the University in the Rackham
Amphitheatre.

20,000 students, Lake says that
his biggeset headache is getting
the crowd to cheer when the Wol-
verines are behind.
CITING THE first quarter of
last Saturday's game withState
as an example, Lake said, "Mich-
igan fans fall flat on their faces
when the team is three or four
points behind."
To instill more spirit and va-
riety into the games this fall,
Lake and his new teamu are
planning to use two new cheers
--"Wolverine Chant" and "Sky-
rocket." In addition, several
new cheering routines are being
worked out with the University
Band furnishing the musical
background.
To partially make up for the
long hours of practice and the
nerve-wracking tension at the
games on Saturday afternoons,
this year's cheerleading team will
again have the use of a brand new
car for the season. Donated by a
local new car agency, the car will
be used to ferry visiting officials
and photgraphers around the
campus on big football weekends
and to take the squad to all the
away games except tomorrow's
contest with Stanford.
professor Will
StudyArabs
Prof. Horace Miner of the so-
ciology .and anthropology depart-
ments has been notified by the
Department of State that he has
been awarded a Fulbright research
grant for Algeria.
Leaving with his family in Feb-
ruary Prof. Miner plans to spend
one year in Algeria comparing the
culture and personality of Arabs
living in 'the desert with those of
Arabs living in cities.

Welcome Newcomers
WE WELCOME YOU TO ANN ARBOR AND
TO USE THE FACILITIES OF OUR OFFICE
Whether you are considering securities for a savings plan or
now have an investment portfolio or are just an outright trader we
can be of service to you.
Our trading facilities are such as to enable us to execute buy
and sell orders in all markets and on all exchanges. We will also
gladly obtain markets and reports on any securities in which you
are interested.
If your interest is in Investment Trusts we can furnish com-
plete information and place orders for the shares of all nationally
known companies.
The personnel of our Ann Arbor Office consists of Dean W.
Titus & John W. Gillen, resident partners. Both men stand ready
to serve you.
TITUS MILLER & COMPANY
MEMBERS-DETROIT STOCK EXCHANGE
I1NrTVEST111E NT SE URTITIEJS

at,

4

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I

DETROIT

ANN ARBOR

TRAVERSE CITY
Phone 4293

103 E. Washington St.

Favorites, Old and New
on
RCA VICTOR
RECORDS
BEETHOVEN: Quartet No. 4
Paganini Quartet
DM 1308 ......... .......... ..........$4.75
DOWLAND: Songs
Aksel Schiotz, Tenor
12'-0924 ................................ $1.31
HAYDN: Symphony No. 93
Indianapolis Orchestra under Sevitzky
DM 1312 .............................$4.75

11

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COLLEGE SHOP

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Introducing . . .those wonderft

TOWN and COUNTRY SHOES

. . .0

11

MONTEVERDI: Madrigals
Ensemble under Boulanger
D M 496 ....... ......................
MOZART: Serenade No. 10 (K.361)
Boston Orchestra under Koussevitzky
DM 1303............................
MOZART: Concerto for Flute and Harp
Leroy, Laskine, with Orchestra under Beecham
DM 1292............. .
MOZART: Concerto No. 21 (K.467)
Schnabel with London Orchestra
DM 486 ................ .............
SCARLATTI: Four Sonatas
Landowska, Harpsichordist
12-0964............................
SIBELIUS: Tapiola
Royal Philharmonic under Beecham
D M 1311 ............................
Now as always, you will find a complete stoc
RCA Victor Regular and 45 RPM Records
at the

$7.25
.$6.00
$4.75
.$6.00

We're proud to present these famous shoe casuals e
Arbor at our College Shop. Good-looking, low - heel
colors . . . all this in Famous Town and Country Shc
signed with your clothes in mind . . . the casual6
clothes American women live in. Let us prove to yo
fit, beauty, and excellent value.

ul, wonderful
for FALL '49
xclusively in Ann
ed, high - fashion
oes ... always de-
easy good-looking
u, their excellent
rJ'& r.
{~
Jp
ti k w a~

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.$1.31

.$2.50

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