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September 30, 1949 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1949

F, THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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1'RIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1949 THE MICHIGAN DAILY P

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Win

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WOE ,'WORRY, AND wonderment have been invading the Michigan
camp in steady and ever-increasing nunmbers.
It all began, of course, last Saturday when the Wolverines
were held to a 7-3 win over a strong and determined eleven from
* Michigan State.
It continued to grow early this week when the Followers of Old
f King Football began looking at the statistics. Stanford had piled up
93 points in two starts while Michigan had managed to get only seven
in its one outing. The Indians had rolled up an average of 471.5 yards
per game, as Michigan totaled an insignificant-looking 204 yards.
WHILE FOKF were thinking these figures over, another disturb-
ing factor, the weather, came into the picture. The temperature hovers
close to ninety out in sunny California while the Wolverines have seen
nothing that even resembled heat in any of their days of practice.
Sixty minutes under such unfamiliar and adverse conditions could
spell defeat for the Wolverines.
Yesterday the situation looked even blacker when Michigan's
ace passer, Charlie Ortmann, hurt his right foot and wore a slipper
as he boarded the plane which flew the team westward.
The men who make a business of the autumn sport lost enough
confidence in the Wolverines to drop their estimate from twenty
points to just one touchdown, but still most of them said Michigan
would win.
HOWEVER, OUT ON the West Coast (where the temperatures
are hot, and the victory-fever even more so) some have gone so far as
to predict a loss for the Maize and Blue.
Dick Hyland in the Los Angeles Times went out on a
limb and said, "Stanford will stop the Wolverines winning streak
at 24 straight games by giving them a licking."
He explains that Michigan is living on its reputation. "Once was
ain't now and right now Michigan ain't," he verbalizes.
Hyland lefthandedly admits that Michigan might come out on
top, "but it will then be a Stanford weakness rather than a Michigan
strength which is operating, Stanford can LOSE this game itself;
Michigan cannot WIN it by itself. It could be I am daffier than the
proverbial loon and that Oosterbaan's awesome armada will prove it
before 5 p.m. comes aroundSaturday in the Stanford stadium."
Let's hope so!
QUALITY GROCERIES
CHOICE MEATS - FROZEN FOODS
SOFT DRINKS - ICE CREAM
Opcn 9 A.M.-9 P.M. Daily - Sundays - Holidays

Pirates Win
Crucial Tilt
Fron Cards,
By The Associated Press
PITTSBURGH-Little Murr y
Dickson, who helped pitch the St.
Louis Cardinals into the World
Series in 1946, may have knocked
them out of it this year.
Dickson pitched the Pittsburgh
Pirates to a 7-2 victory over his
former mates yesterday and it
knocked them out of first place
in the National League. The
Brooklyn Dodgers took over the
top rung by sweeping a double-
header from the Braves in Boston,
9-2 and 8-0.
* * *
A ROUSING four-run Pirate
outburst against starter Gerald
Staley and Howie Pollet in the
sixth inning helped seal St. Louis'
dcoom, and paved the way for Dick-
) i's fifth triumph of the year
over the Redbirds. I
The Cards hope to get back
on the beam again in Chicago,
where they open a three-game
series tomorrow. Dyer has an-
nounced southpaw Max Lanier
(5-3) as his pitcher.

ore Runs S
BOSTON - VP) - The dauntless
Brooklyn Dodgers squeezed past'
the St. Louis Cardinals into first
place in the home stretch of the
fierce National League race yes-
terday by defeating the Boston
Braves, 9-2 and 8-0.
Coupled with Pittsburgh's sec-
ond successive defeat of the Card-
inals, the Dodgers now lead by
half a game, with two to play,

park Victories

Bums Blast Braves 9-2, 8-0;

Tribe Gains
Half Game;
AT P71

big, black raincoat, the umpires 1 eart1
didn't think it was funny and
threw him out of the game.
Then the Braves lit a fire at the The Detroit Tigers and the In-
edge of their dug-out presumably T
to guide their batters back. The ians will resume their private war
crowd that cheered the Braves to for third place in the American
the pennant last year was raucous .eague when they open a three
and hynical. ame series in Detroit this after-
But the Dodgers didn't care. noon.
They were back in front. Now if The Tigers have been idle since

both at Philadelphia. The Cards
have three games left, all with the YanksRed S
Chicago Cubs.KX
THE ** * Are Ramned Out
THE, SECOND game of the
damp-gray double - header was A short truce was declared
played in a drizzle and ended after yesterday in the torrid Ameri-
five innings in semi-darkness amid can League pennant race. Both
much comic horse-play by the the Yankees and Red Sox were
Braves. rained out, leaving. the two
The last time the Dodgers were teams deadlocked f or first
in front in the Natiohal League place.
was on Aug. 16, and the margin
was only half a game. The Dodgers they win their remaining two
and the Cardinals were tied on games, the St. Louis Cardinals
Aug. 19, but from then on it has must take all three at Chicago
been St. Louis in front. to make the race a tie. The same
In the last of the fifth inning two clubs were tied for first at
of the second game, when Connie the close of the regular 1946 sea-
Ryan of the Braves tried to come son, and the Cardinals won the
into the batters' circle wearing a playoff.

F unday, while the Indians have
layed several games and climbed
t> within one game of the current-
y third place Detroit team.
BOB KENNEDY, third baseman,

Major League Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE AMERICAN LEAGUE
WV L Pct. G.B. W L Pct. G.B.
Brooklyn.....96 56 .632 .... Boston .......95 56 .629
St. Louis .....95 56 .629 . . - New York . . . .95 56 .629
Philadelphia . .80 72 .526 16 Detroit .......87 64 .576 8
Boston .......73 79 .480 23 Cleveland ....86 65 .570 9
New York .. . .73 79 .480 23 Philadelphia . .79 72 .523 16
Pittsburgh . . .69 82 .457 26 Chicago ......62 89 .411 33
Cincinnati . . .61 90 .404 34} St. Louis .....51 100 .338 44
Chicago ........59 92 .391 36?! Washington ...49 102 .325 46
No Fuss - No Bother - No Worry
NO PARKING TROUBLES
DRIVE THROUGH!
Read and Use DailyClassified Ads
For Fast, Convenient Drive-in Service,
Always Stop at the

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nd Larry Doby, right fielder,
blasted home runs for the In-
dians yesterday as they beat the
Chicago White Sox by an 8-3 score.
Behind 3-0 at the end of the
third inning, and still trailing
at the end of the fifth, the
Cleveland team was forced to
rally to defeat the Windy City
aggregation.
Hal Newhouser will oppose his
old rival, Bob Feller, in today's
Detroit-Cleveland opening contest.
at 2 p.m. Call Jack Young for res-
ervations (4728).
Thurs., Oct. 13-Regular meet-
ing of club; everyone welcome;
7:15 p.m., Lane Hall; slides will be
shown.
Annual Fall Reepeition for For-
sign Students and their American
Friends, Sat., Oct. 1, 7:30 p.m.,
Rackham Amphitheatre and As-
sembly Hall.

.i

IDCAILY
OFFICIAL

(Continued from Page 4)
Winchell House, dance, West
Quad.
La p'tite causette will meet for
the first time this semester on
Mon., Oct. 3, 3:30 p.m., Grill Room,
League, and henceforth every
Monday and Thursday at the same
hour.
This group is organized for the

benefit of all students interested
in speaking French informally.
Armenian Student's Association
will meet on Mon., Oct. 3, 7:30
p.m., Rm. 3 M, Union. Election of
officers. New members welcome.
Hillel Foundation: Open house
for Graduate Students, Sat., Oct.
1,, 8 p.m.
Club Europa: General meeting,
Mon., Oct. 3, 8 p.m., International
Center. All new students from
Europe invited.
Saturday Luncheon Discussion:
Lane Hall, 12:15 p.m. Reservations
may be made at Lane Hall before
Saturday at 10 a.m. Phone 3-1511,
Ext. 2148.
U. of M. Hostel Club:
The following is a list of activi-
ties for the club for the following
two weeks. All members and any-
one else who would like to attend
are welcome.
Sat., Oct. 1-Square Dance at
Jones School; 8-11 p.m.
Sun., Oct. 2-Hike; somewhere
out Geddes Avenue; meet at Lane
Hall, 2 p.m.
Mon., Oct. 3-Organizational
meeting of the club; anyone in-

terested in planning future activi-
ties is welcome; 7:15 p.m., Lane
Hall.
Fri., Oct. 7-Wiener roast at the
island; meet at Lane Hall at 5:15
p.m. Call Mary Edwards for res-
ervations (2-2823). *
Sat., Oct. 8-Square Dance at
Jones School; 8-11 p.m.
Sun., Oct. 9-Hike to Pittsfield
Village for supper; meet at League

v

721 East Huron

Tel. 7686

r

ARTUR

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SUPERB RECORDINGS MADE AVAILABLE BY 1

will open the
CHORAL UNION
SERIES
Tuesday, Oct. 4, 8:30 P.M.
10 STAR CONCERTS

WHRV IS ANN ARBOR'S ONLY FULL TIME RADIO STATION

for your listening pleasure...

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ARTUR RUBINSTEIN

Rubinstein, Oct. 23; Vienna Choir Boys, Oct. 15; Boston
Symphony, Oct. 23; Cleveland Orchestra, Nov. 6; Italo
Tajo, Nov. 16; Rise Stevens, Dec. 5; Cincinnati Sym-
phony, Jan. 17; Myra Hess, Feb. 17; Pittsburgh Sym-
phony, Feb. 23; Zino Francescatti, Mar. 20.

invites you to listen to
STEVE FILIPIAK ........'39
and his
MATINEE AT SUNUP
Monday thru Saturday 7-9 A.M.
PLATTER MATINEE
Sunday Afternoon 1-2:30 P.M.

'Cockaigne Overture--Wand Of Youth (Elgar) LLF43
Lon. Phil.-Van Beinum 5.95
*Romeo and Juliet-Excerpts (Berlioz) LLP3
Paris Cons.-Munch - 5.95
Four Mailander Quartets (Mozart) DGS5
Dessauer Quartet 11.52
Traum Durch Die Darnmerung (R. Strauss) DG68131
H. Schlusnus, Baritone 2.62
:.Three Bear Suite (E. Coates) LPS27

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New Symphony - Coates.

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Symphony in D (Cherubini) DGS9
Leipzig Orchestra - Schmitz 11.57

will open the
EXTRA CONCERT
SERIES

'Trial By Jury (Gilbert-Sullivan) LLP70
D'Oyly Carte Opera_

TOP LOCAL PE SONALTIES

Suite Pastorale (Chabrier) LA90
Lon. Phil. - Martinon.

-5.95
5.25

Sunday, October 9,

7 P.M.

"EYE OPENERS" ... Bob Brown daily 6-7 A.M.
"CLUB 1600"... George Malacos... M., W., Sat. 10-10:30 P.M.
"PAJAMA PARTY" ... Sleepyhead Ted.. ..Midnight to 2 A.M.
"PAUL TOMPKINS AT THE ORGAN"
Tuesday through Saturday 11:30 to 12 midnite

"Symphony No. 5 in C minor (Beethoven) LLP7
Paris Cons,-SchurichtL 5.95
- LONG-PLAYING RECORDS
Amply Listening Facilities in Separated Classical and
Popular Departments Make Record Hunting
a Joy Where
"Music on Records Is A Pleasure

5 STAR CONCERTS

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