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January 19, 1950 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Track

Season

JnenJ . 28
State AAU Cinder Meet
T ess McEwen, Fonville

DEFENSIVE STAR NOW:
Bob Harrison Successful as Pro Cager

Bur ford Threatens 'M'
I Hockey Scoring Record

Gil Burford will smash all in-
dividual season scoring records
this year if he continues his red-
hot pace of the first eleven Wol-
verine hockey contests.
Unofficial figures reveal that
with the season not yet half over,
the flashy Michigan forward has
amassed 34 points or slightly bet-
ter than three per game.
WITH a 24 game schedule,
imple arithmetic shows that at
this rate Gil will roll up better than
75 markers which would easily
surpass Gordie McMillan's one
season record of 61, set last year.
Actually Burford is taking up
where he left off last year when
a late season surge gave him
second dlace in team scoring,
only five points behind McMil-
. lan's record total.
Center Neil Celley is well ahead
of his last year's pace when his
26 goals was tops for the Wolver-
ine outfit. So far this season he
has 15 talliesand 11 assists for a
26 point total and a second in
the scoring race.
NOT TOO FARI behind these
two scoring hawks is the Wolver-
ine captain, Wally Grant. His 20
point total, however, doesn't re-
flect his value to the team as a
great play-maker and back-check-
er.
The rest of the squad is pretty
well strung out behind the
leaders with Sophomore Bob
A Heathcott and Ross Smith tied
for fourth with nine points a
piece.
As a team the Wolverines havel

ruffled the netting 64 times for a
5.8 average as compared to the
opposition's 33 markers and 3 per
game average.
The dominance of the first line
is again shown by the fact that
the Celley-Grant-Burford trio
have accounted for 40 goals or
nearly two-thirds of the team
total.
The complete unofficial totals
follow:

Player G
Gil Burford ..........18
Neil Celley.......... 15
Wally Grant ..........7
Bob Heathcott ........ 7
Ross Smith .......... 4
Joe Marmo ...........2
Al Bassey ............ 4
Lennie Brumm....... 2
Ron Roberts......... 2
Paul Pelow...........2
Ed May..............1
Graham Cragg.......0
TOTALS .... 64

A
16
11
13
2
5
5
2
3
2
1
1
1
62

Pts
34
26
20
9
9
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
126

-Daily-Wally Barth
GIL BURFORD
. .goalies' nightmare

By BILL CONNOLLY
Charlie Fonville, former world's
champion shot-putter, and Don
McEwen, Wolverine sophomore
who now reigns as king of the Big
Ten's distance runners, will be
spctlighted at the annual Michi-
gan AAU Relays, scheduled for
7:00 p.m. on January 28th, in Yost
Field House.
Attracting talent from more
than 20 midwestern colleges and
universities, the meet will be the
only home event onthe Michigan
athletic agenda for the examina-
tion period.
FONVILLE, who was sidelined
in 1948 following an operation, has
been tossing the shot since last
fall and has regained much of his
speedy, powerful snap.
McEwen, amazing young dis-
tance runner, will find stiff com-
petition as he enters a field that
includes what Coach Don Can-
ham calls: "The greatest group
of distance runners in the coun-
try."
Canham was referring to men
like Jack Dianetti and Bill Mack,
two of the men who will lead
Michigan State's complete team
to Ann Arbor.
Sharing the world champions'
spotlight will be Jack Stayton,
freshman from Purdue who ran
a 4.21.8 mile last year to es-
tablish himselfas the world's
finest high school performer in
that event.
The Big Ten freshman rule will
force Stayton to run unattached,
and it is likely that all Wolverine
runners will also be forced to run
in plain uniforms due to exam
schedules.
* * *
THE following week, February
4th, will find the Wolverines com-
peting in the Michigan State Re-
lays in East Lansing. A full team
will be entered in this meet and it

should help strengthen them for
the rugged Wisconsin meet, sched-
uled for February 11th.
To be held in Yost Field House
on the Saturday night of J-Hop,
the Wisconsin meet will feature
one of the greatest track men in
Big Ten History, Don Gehr-
mann.
Touted last year as "The King
of the Indoor Milers," the Wiscon-
sin wonder was undefeated until
he met Michigan's McEwen in the
Western Conference Cross Coun-
try Championships last fall.
McEwen dethroned him at that
meeting, but what Mac will be
able to do in the shorter distances
still remains a question.
THE SCHEDULE
Saturday, January 28th: Michi-
gan AAU Meet in Yost Field
House. (Finals start at 7:00
p.m.)
Saturday, February 4th: Michi-
gan State Relays at East Lan-
sing.
Saturday, February 11th: Wis-
consin-Michigan Dual Meet in
Yost Field House; first event:
7:00 p.m.

By TED PAPES
Add another name to the list
of Michigan athletes who have
succeeded in professional sports.
The newcomer is Bob Harrison,
for three years a dominant factor
in Western Conference basketball
circles as a Wolverine guard until
his graduation last June.
* * *
IN COMBINATION with Pete
Elliott he helped provide his school
with the most feared backcourt
S PORTS
BOB SANDELL, Night Editor
unit in the Big Ten last season.
Twice he was named on the all-
Conference first team.
Today he is at the pinnacle
of the cage ladder as a member
of the World Champion Min-
neapolis Lakers of the Nation-
al Basketball Association. The
team's roster includes such fam-
ous hardwood personalities as
the incomparable George Mikan,
Arnie Ferrin, the All-American
from Utah, and Jim Pollard:.
When former Michigan coach
Ozzie Cowles took his present job
as mentor at Minnesota, the Lak-

BOB HARRISON
. . . in fast company
* * *
ers consulted him about Harrison.
"Grab him quick!" replied Cowles.
"He'll be one of your most de-
pendable ball players."
* * *
AND SO IT happened that he
became the second choice of the
Northland club last spring, second
to Hamline star, Vern Mikkelson.
Harrison and the Lakers have
gotten along well together. At
present he combines at guard
with Herm Schaefer on the
starting quintet. .Schaefer is a
seasoned veteran of pro wars
and has undoubtedly aided his
young teammate in learning the
intricacies of the game.
Here's the surprising thing
about Harrison. Today he is high-
ly regarded in the league for his

defensive prowess, yet at Michigan
it was his scoring ability that kept
him in the headlines.
HIS MAIN function then was
to soften the opposing defense
with accurate long shots which
fell true enough to the mark to
make him one of the two top
Wolverine point makers.
At Minneapolis he is sent out
after the opposing team's lead-
ing scorer and so far has done
a commendable job, according
to his coach, Johnny Kundla.
He has left the field goal pro-
duction to the front line.
If now he should resume his
Michigan scoring activities, the
Lakers might become the mon-
sters of the NBA.
* * *
"JUST WAIT until he gets a
little confidence," says Kundla.
"When Harrison starts to hit from
out on the court, he'll be tough
to stop, and then we'll have one
more man to take the pressure
off Mikan and Pollard under the
basket."
He is one of the few first year
men who have become prominent
in professional basketball this year
despite the fact that he broke in
with a top contender.
The Lakers are glad they took
Cowles' advice.
RELAXATION IS WISE It
Try a Scalp Treatment or a Facikl
to Stimulate and Relax You for
Those Exams . . . RESULTS ARE
AMAZING !!
The Daseola Barbers
Liberty near State

SMALL BUT MIGHTY:
Skoog Poses Cage Problem
Equal to Schnittker, Rehfeldt

By HAROLD TANNER
In their two losses over the past
weekend, Michigan's cagers ran
into the two hottest pointgetters in
the Big Nine in the forms of Dick
Schnittker and Don Rehfeldt.
Schnittker is the top average
man with 24.3 points per game
while Rehfeldt, defending scoring
champion, is high point man with
87 in four contests.
'TRAILING right behind these
two gentleman is Whitey Skoog
who leads his Minnesota team
against the Maize and Blue Satur-
day night in the final game of
the first semester.
Although stopped with only
eight points in the loss to Wis-
consin Monday, Skoog has
tossed through 55 points in
three games for an 18.3 mark
which is not too bad for a lit-
tle man.
Compared with Rehfeldt who

towers at 6-6 and Schnittker who
is only one inch shorter, Skoog
is a relative midget at 5-11.
* * *
IN THE Gophers' opening game
with Northwestern Skoog sparked
a losing cause with a 24 point en-
try, and came back in the second
contest against Purdue to register
23 points. Wisconsin then applied
the shackles to the junior for-
ward and his average dropped.
Against Michig'an last year
Skoog was instrumental in the
pair of wins registered by the
Gophers as he netted 16 points
in the first game and came back
with a 12 point tally in the see-

Mat men's Undefeated Streak
Jeopardized by Illinois, Navy

Ir-

ond contest. Snead Wins
He went on to garner 116 points
in conference play for sixth place 'layAoff
in Big Nine scoring and All-Con- I aL.A.
ference mention, an unusual hon-
or for a sophomore. LOS ANGELES - (tP) - Sam
So far this year Skoog has hit Snead defeated Ben Hogan by
on 31% of his field goal attempts, four strokes yesterday in a be-
a figure which is consistent with lated 18-hole play-off for top
his 31.7 percentage during the honors in the Los Angeles Open
1948-49 season. His accuracy from Golf Tournament.
the foul line this season has been Snead shot a 36-36-72 and
remarkable with 11 conversions Hogan a 38-38-76. Par for the
in 12 attempts. Riviers Country Club is 35-36
Skoog is not a one man team as -71.
evidenced by the presence of The two tied last week at the
mates Maynard Johnson and Dick end of the regulation 72 holes,
Means in the upper twenty of the with scores of 280. The play-off
Big Nine scoring, but he is the man last Wednesday was delayed by
to watch Saturday night. rain until yesterday.

By JERRY BALBUS
Michigan wrestlers will face no
easy task in trying to extend
their three game winning streak
during the between-semester per-
iod.
The Wolverine's 'jinx' team,
Illinois, will be first on the list.
In twelve dual meets over a period
of 27 years, Michigan has gar-
nered only two victories and none
since 1940.
ine .* * *
LAST YEAR, the Illini over-
whelmed the wrestlers, 25-3. Bob
Betzig, who now coaches the
freshmen grapplers, turned in the
lone victory.
On February 4, the United
States Naval Academy squad
will invade Ann Arbor. The Mid-
shipmen claimed the Wolverines
as their fifty-second consecu-
tive victim, 10-2, last season,
and have lost only once in 61
matches over the past years.
The captain of the Navy team
is Wayne Smith, a former Maize
and Blue grappler who in 1946
took the Conference 136-pound
crown.
* * *
THE MATMEN hold a consid-
erable edge over Michigan State,
their next opponent, in dual meet

competition. The Spartans, who
during the past twenty years have
been established as one of the top
wrestling powers in the nation,
have won only seven times out of
twenty-six tries.
In 1946, when the Spartans
sported five state and one na-
tional champion, the Wolverines
still managed to turn in a sur-
prise victory. The match was
highlighted by Bill Courtright's
triumph over the Spartan's Na-
tional AAU champ, Gale Mikles.
For the last between-semester
meet, the matmen will travel out
to Pittsburgh to face a newly or-
ganized squad there. This year, is
the first since 1938, that the Pan-
thers have had wrestling on their
sports program.
Although they will be inexperi-
enced as far as competitors go,
their coach is not. As a student at
Oklahoma A&M, Rex Perry, was
National Collegiate 136 - pound
titlist for three consecutive years.
While coaching at Tulsa Central
High School, his teams had a habit
of winning state championships.
In fifteen years as high school
mentor, he has turned out 34 in-
dividual state champion and four
National AAU title holders.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued frot Page 2)

A.H.;
hold,
A.H. ;

Reichart, 225 A.1.; Rein-
229 A.HI .; 'Thurber, 2203
Wensinger, 35 A.H.

Concerts
May Festival: The University
Musical Society announces the
following tentative schedule of
May Festival concerts:
Philadelphia Orchestra - All
Concerts. Sketches of programs
(Details later).
Thurs., 8:30-Ljuba Welitsch,
soprano. Eugene Ormandy, Con-
ductor. Mozart arias and Finale to
"Salome" (Strauss) and symphon-
ic works.
Fri.., 8:30 - Thor Johnson,
Conductor. Bach's "Brandenburg"
Concerto No. 5-Alexander Hils-
berg, William Kincaid, James.
Wolfe. Walton's Viola Concerto-
William Primrose. Bach's "Magni-
ficat" - Norma Heyde, Blanche
Thebom, Harold Haugh, Mack;
Harrell and Choral Union.
Sat., 2:30 - Jan Peerce, Tenor,

in several arias; orchestral num-
bers. Alexander Hilsberg, Conduc-
tor. Youth Chorus in "Walrus and
the Carpenfer" (Fletcher), Mar-
guerite Hood, Conductor.
Sat., 8:30 - William Kapell, Pi-
anist, in Rachmaninoff's Concerto
No. 3. All-Russian program. Eu-
gene Ormandy, Cond.
Sun., 2:30 - Nathan Milstein,
Violinist, in Brahms' Concerto,
"Song of Destiny," and Peter
Mennin's "The Cycle" - Choral
Union; Thor Johnson, Conductor.
Sun., 8:30 - Marian Anderson,
Contralto, in Mahler's "Kenderto-
tenlieder," and "Jeanne d'Arc au
Bucher"; also symphonic works.
Eugene Ormandy, Conductor.
Mail orders for Season Tickets
are being accepted and filed in
sequence. Remaining tickets in
Block A; Block B; Block C. Ad-
dress: Charles A. Sink, President,

University Musical Society, Burton
Tower.
Events Today
International Center Weekly
Tea: 4:30-6 p.m., for all foreign
students and American friends.
Sociedad Hispania: Will all
members please report for Ensian
photo at 7:30 p.m., League. (Con-
sult bulletin board for room.)

A R R 0 WSHIR TS & TIES,
UNDERWEAR " HANDKERCHIEFS " SPORTS SHIRTS

La
Grill

P'tite Causette: 3:30 p.m.,
Room, Michigan League.
(Continued on Page 4)

Graduate Students in History:
The following course, not announ-
ced in either the Announcement
or the Schedule, will be offered in
the spring term:
History 264, Studies in United
States History, 1790-1830. II. (3)
MWF 2, 315b, HH, Crane.

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