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December 10, 1949 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-12-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1949

4

OIL, ROADS, AIRFIELDS BIG FACTORS:
Clark Believes Sinkiang Key to Asia
* ** * *

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

'k

~1 i 1

By JOE TANNENBAUM
Control of the little-known bor-
der province of Sinkiang (Chinese
Turkestan) gives Russia the
means to dominate all of Asia, ac-
cording to Prof. John Clark of the
geology department.
Prof. Clark, who spent two and
a half years in Asia with the Ar-
my Engineers during the war, re-
cently returned from a 14-month
trip through Sinkiang and India.
He is the only living western
geologist who has been in Sinki-
ang.
"THE PROVINCE is important
in world affairs because it possess-
es (1) tremendous oil reserves, (2)
the only east-west highway across
Asia and (3) all-weather airfields;"
Prof. Clark declared.
"Surface indications are that
these oil fields are as rich, both
in quantity and quality, as the
fabulous Arabian fields," he said.
"Now that the Communists con-
trol China, Russia can exploit
these oil fields."
RUSSIA'S annual oil produc-
tion is equal to less than two
months of American production
and the output of Russian wells is
falling off, he said. Prof. Clark
pointed out that the importance
of oil in modern warfare makes
the oil reserves of Sinkiang vital
to Russia's war potential.
"Besides containing rich
stores of oil, copper, iron and
coal, Sinkiang is the site of the
only east-west highway across
Asia," Prof. Clark said.
The highway closes the gap be-
tween the Chinese and Russian
railheads, and without it the Rus-,

J m m -.- o a r

FORSALE_
TUXEDO, TAILS-Size 36. $15 each.
202 Hinsdale, 2-4591. )25
USED GAS STOVE suitable for frater-
nity house use. Fair condition. Best
offer gets it. Call at 1601 Washtenaw
after 7 p..)24
GET A GIFT just for her this Christ-
mas! Her favorite brand of perfume
and cosmetics is found at our store.
Calkins-Fletcher
State Street at N. University )5
"QUALITY" BOXER PUPPIES-Ypsi
4503 R13, after 5_p.m. )20
PITTSBURGH, CINCINNATI Orchs. 2
tickets each. First balcony, 1st row,
center. Vibbert, 3-4433. )19
FORD, Model A. Best offer. Call 3-1183.
)16
SAMPLES from nationally known wool-
en company. Reduced prices while
they last. Jackets, snow suits, sweat-
ers, woolen shirts. Assorted sizes. Call
3-1183. )17
GIVE A BIRD to shut-in for a real
Merry Christmas. Parakeets, canaries
and cages at 562 S. Seventh. Ph. 5330.
2Bi
RUBBER FOOTWEAR SPECIALS - Toe
rubbers, $1.49; 4-buckle dress galoshes,
$3.75; low zipper galoshes, $3.49; high
-zipper galoshes, $4.25. Open until 6
p.m. SAM'S STORE, 122 E. Washing-
ton. _)6
WOOD
For fireplace or furnace. Call 3-4575.
)15
COUSINS ON STATE STREET)-
Sanforized Flannelette Gowns
and Pajamas $3.95
Sizes 32-40 - Assorted Colors.
Prints and Polka Dots )2
FOR SALE-1948 Ford V-8, two-door.
A-1 condition. Radio and heater.
Original owner. 1220 Prospect St.
Phone Carl 2-2266. )21
BEAUTIFUL .0 solitaire diamond ring.
Appraised at over $200. Will sacri-
fice for $135 or nearest offer. Call J.
E. Lesstrang 5868. 6 to 9. )22
TUXEDO FOR SALE-Size 36. Excellent
condition. Ask for Jack Perou. Phn.
2-2996 bet. 10-11 p.m. 712 McKinley.
)23
FOR SALE-Set of formal tails. Siz
36. For $35. Call 2-1284. )86

TRANSPORTATION
WANTED-Ride to Palm Beach,tFlorida
holidays. Also return if returning
here Jan. 1. Ph. Dexter 5501.
WANTED-2 or 3 riders to go to Los
Angeles, one way, Christmas vacation.
References. Ph. 7601 evenings and
weekends. )20T
WANTED-Ride to Tulsa for two.
Call Ringold, 340 Cooley House, E. Q.,
or Foley 20 Winchell Hse, W._Q. )35T
WANTED-Riders to Norfolk, Va., or
anywhere on route. Leaving Dec. 16,
p.m. Call 6876 eve. )34T
DRIVING TO San Antonia, Texas for
holiday. Room for one. Phone 8975
between 1 Iand 9 p.m. )33T
BALTIMORE-Desire ride Thurs. eve.
Share expenses. Call Jim Wright.
2-3781. )38T
RIDE-To vicinitly of Rochester, N. Y.
(specifically Seneca Falls, N. Y.) for
Christmas vacation. Will share driv-
ing and expenses. Call Norman Pon-
tius, 2-6500. )37T
RIDERS WANTED-To Scranton, Pa.,
Dec. 16. Call 5119 after 5 p m )39T
BUSINESS SERVICES
NEED EXTRA MONEY? Earn it by
baby-sitting. Call Kiddie Kare, 3-1121.
)35B
Paul's Musical Repair
Van Doren Clarinet Reeds
Box of 25 - $4.50
New and Used Instruments
209 E. Washington )4B
HAVE YOUR TYPEWRITER repaired by
the Office Equipment Service Com-
pany, 215_E. Liberty. )16B
EFFICIENT, EXPERT, PROMPT Type-
writer repair service. Moseley's Type-
writer and Supply Company, 214 E.
Washington. Phone 5-888. )5B
GREETING CARDS inscribed in colors.
10c each or $1.00 per box. T. A. Early,
402 Observatory. Phone 2-8106. )8B
SHIRTS--Nine hour service (by request).
Three day service (regular service).
Ace Laundry. 116 . University. )21B
WASHING and/or ironing done in my
own home. Free pick-up and delivery.
Phone 2-90_20. )1B
NEARLY NEW SHOP-Fur and cloth
coats, formals, suits, dresses. 1091,
E. Washington, oven Dietzel's. Phone
2-4669. _______ _) 27B
PH OTO-ENGRAVING
24-hour service at Reasonable Charges
On High Quality Engraving
Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard

PERSONAL
CLUB 211 BULLETIN-New Club 2111
Policy--No expiration date on meal
tickets! Tickets honored on any day.
Need not be used on consecutive d ays.1
Your ticket expires only wnw ali1
meals have been punched. J.D.M. )42'1
STUDENT HOLIDAY TRAINS---Reduced
rates on N.Y. Central. route East and
West. Reserved seats on sale at Ad-
ministration Bldg. Monday through
Friday, 2:30-4:30. $5 will reserve a
ticket. )38P
LEARN TO DANCE
JIMMIE HUNT DANCE STUDIO
209 S. State
Phone 8161 )1P
HEY JACK-I'm saving real dough by
eating the daily 59c dinner special at
J. D. Miller's Cafeteria. Believe i or
not, this includes entree, pate,
vegetable, salad or Ir-s.ert 1p or
cake), bread and b(ter, beverage.
Try it yourself! Only 13 . Yours ill.
), Pi
APPROPRIATE GIFTS FROM
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Engagement Calendar with 55 campus
views and other Michigan so uvenirs.
Alumni Counsel Office Michigan
DEAR MR. DACLADER: What are my
chances of obtaining a reliable means
of transportation to my habitual
apode over the Chirstmnas Holidays?j
B. R. Ane.
IF YOU ORDER a Christmas gift of
TIME or LIFE for a non-student
friend at the regular $6.00 a year
non-student rate, you can order an1
8-month subscription for yourself at
only $1.75 extra. With two gifts at
$10.75 your own subscription costs
only 75c extra for 8 months. Take
advantage of these fantastic offers
now by phoning Student Periodical
Agency, 2-82-42. )3
OPTICAL SERVICE
for the Campus Area
CAMPUS OPTICIANS
222 Nickels Arcade Ph. 2-9116

HELP WANTED
PORTEI f1r genral cleaninlg two hours
a day in exchangtEe for meals. Apply
in person after 3 pm. at 907 Lincoln.
20H
NJ iH'T1 CI(ERKITNO -5 p.m. to 12 mid-
maiI liiwluclin _moon i vth cooking
privh 'e, snul wage. Call 3-4322. )21H
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-M's Clinton wristwatch on
Foresto r near campus. Reward. Call
Vein a,. 11. 3-4475. )6L
LOST- -Silver Ronson lighter Monday
ev. Between Uiion and Yost Field
louseon Wes;t sidewofState St. En-
graved F.R.B. Reward. Call Fred
Breidenbach. 2-4481. )5L
LOST -Golt capped Parker "51" pen,
green. Between West Quad and
Anell ail. Reward. 413 Chicago
-4
FOR RENT
BRING YOUR WEEKEND GUESTS to
ihe Pirce Transit Home, 1133 E. Ann.
Phoni 8144. 1R
WANTED TO BUY
Wl'lE LOOKING for a 6-7 room house.
Close to Angell School. Occupancy
by late spring or sooner if desired.
Phon 2-0779. )40W
GIRLS En li -h Bicycle. Phone 3-1511
I '. 587 )39W
ROOMS FOR RENT
ANCIES for male students.
Double rooms. House on campus.
1hcne 2-2052. )34R
DO 1 YOU KNOW ... that the last
major league baseball player to hit
over .400 was Ted Williams, who
powdered the old apple at the .401
mark during the 1941 season.
SHORT ORDERS
and
Full Course Meals
TRIANGLE RESTAURANT
-_ 898 0 South State

.,,

* * *
sians could not effectively utilize
the vast resources of China, or
transport troops and equipment
between Europe and East Asia in
wartime, he explained.
* * *
THE Trans-Siberian Railroad

* * *
is not dependable because of bad
weather and its extreme length,
according to Prof. Clark.
"During the Russian occupation
of Sinkiang in the late 1930's, six
airfields were constructed. These
airfields form the only all-weather

* * *
air link between Russia and East
Asia and can easily be expanded to
accommodate heavy bombers and
transports."
"Thus Chinese Turkestan is one
of the most strategic areas in the
world," Prof. Clark said.

.4_

I

Continuous from 1 P.M.

m

Job Prospects
In Michigan
Good --Purdom

.0

TWINKLE, TWINKLE:
Struve, Chicago Astronomer,
Discusses Evolution of Stars

Replies To Charge
By Northwestern 'U'
Employment prospects with
large corporations are better in
Michigan than a recent survey by
Northwestern University indicates,
according to T. Luther Purdom,
director of the Bureau of Appoint-
ments.
Purdom discussed a report by
the director of Northwestern's
placement bureau, Frank S. Endi-
cott, who announced this week
that 169 well-known companies
contacted will require about 25
per cent fewer college graduates
nextyear.
* * *
"APPARENTLY the peak of em-
ployment of inexperienced college
graduates by business and industry
was reached in late 1948 or early
1949," Endicott explained.
Because of the near-comple-
tion of postwar expansion pro-
grams, present hiring is mainly
on a replacement basis, he said,
and lessening demand is evident
in all fields.
Endicott reported that hiring
will be cut as much as 55 per cent
in personnel work, 35 per cent in
sales and chemistry and 25 per
cent in accounting and chemical
engineering.
He foresees "best opportunities"
in insurance and merchandising,
with only "small decreases."
"ALTHOUGH the general ten-
dency is correct," Purdom re-
marked, "the situation doesn't
seem to us as critical as the North-
western report makes it appear."
A bright side of the survey's
employment picture is the ex-
pected increase in college gradu-
ates entering smaller businesses.
Also, Endicott noted, the aver-
age beginning salary for men is
expected to remain the same,
$245 per month.
To solve the growing problem of
how to employ the record number
of graduates, the companies will
survey employment policies and
seek to develop closer .cooperation
with college and universities.
"The prospective drop in oppor-
tunities need not be alarming," Dr.
Endicott pointed out "if the rapid
expansion programs of the last
"z few years are remembered."
Dr. Purdom and Dr. Endicott
agree fully that "plenty of oppor-
tunity still exists for the individual
willing to start wherever he can,
work hard, and let his education
prove its value on the job."
Sutton, Former
Sheriff, Dies Here
Daniel B. Sutton, 77 years old,
former state legislator and Wash-
tenaw County sheriff, died yester-
day at his home, 705 Church St.
Sutton served in the Legisla-
ture from 1912 to 1916. Previous-
ly, he had been sheriff from 1906
to 1910.

Man's theorizing on the evolu-I
tion of stars is similar to an ob-
server from space seeing the earth
for one second and then discuss-
ing the evolution of mankind, ac-
cording to Prof. Otto Struve,
Chairman of the University of
Chicago's Department of Astron-
omy.
Speaking to a capacity crowd.
at Rackham Amphitheater last
night, Prof. Struve outlined two
Free Movie
To End Art
Cinema Year
The Art Cinema League will end
this year's program of motion pic-
tures with the free movie, "Becky
Sharp," at 6, 7:30 and 9 pm. today
and tomorrow at the Architecture
Auditorium.
A tentative schedule for the
coming year has beentset up, in-
cluding "Devil in the 'Flesh,"
"Monsieur Vincent" and "Quar-
tet."
* * *
THE ART CINEMA League, by
keeping prices low and quality
high, competes with the commer-
cial theatres. Members believe that
this competition brings better
movies to all theatres in this area.
The functions of the ACL, ac-
cording to Manager Art Mos-
koff, are to provide cheaply a
type of entertainment which is
not usually fostered by regular
exhibitors; to encourage the
growth of movies as a form of
art; and to financially assist stu-
dent organizations.
"Any student organization,"
Moskoff commented, "is eligible to
co-sponsor a movie-first come,
first serve."
.* * *
POSSIBLE PICTURE presenta-
tions for the ACL are reviewed by
a faculty board consisting of Prof.
Otto Graf, of the German depart-
ment; Prof. Richard Boys, of the
English department; Prof. Lila
Pargment, of the Russian depart-
ment; Prof. George Brigham, of
the Architecture School; Prof.
James 6'Neill, of the French de-
partment; and Prof. Harold Mc-
Farlan, of the Engineering School.
The board screens out poorer
cuass flms, so that each week the
ACL presents only the more
widely acclaimed pictures which
appear inspiring or stimulating.
The ACL uses its profits for va-
rious community services such as
buying books on the cinema for the
library and supporting the Gothic
Film Society.
RECENTLY THE ACL bought a
new motion picture screen for Hill
Auditorium.
Profits from former film show-
ing, are being used in presenting
"Becky Sharp," as a free movie.
This, the first full-length tech-

of the processes by which stars
are believed to rejuvenate.
* * *
"ONE PROCESS begins when
dull stars that are immersed in
dust clouds are bombarded by par-
ticles which add mass and pro-
duce high rotation and bright
luminosity. Such a star spins so
rapidly that its edges flatten, its
equator bulges and rings of dust
particles resembling the rings of
Saturn are formed," Prof. Struve
continued.
The star, loosing more mass
than it gains, he said, also loses
its brightness.
He added that in time such a
star is again immersed in a dust
cloud, and the process starts over
again.
* * *
THIS TYPE of evolution, Prof.
emphasized, has actually been ob-
served and verified through spec-
troscopic surveys of the Milky
Way.
The second process, still a
theory, he said, covers slowly ro-
tating stars that release light by
the changing of hydrogen into
helium and the transformation of
mass into energy.
Our sun, which is of this type,
will eventually burn itself out in
10 billion years, he added.
Gulanties Still
SeekingActs
This year's Gulantics review still
needs additional competent acts.
Tryouts for the show will be held
1 p.m. today in Rm. 3G of the Un-
ion.
,Acts of almost any size, shape or
description can be accommodated
in the Gulantics review. Singing
groups, juggling acts, imitators,
dancers, or unicyclists are just a
few of the varied types of acts
which can be included in the show.
The Gulantics Review was orig-
inated last year by the Men's Glee
Club, the Union, and the League
to provide the campus with an out-
let for local performers, and at the
same time give the campus an en-
tertaining variety show.
Prizes of $100,$75, and $25 will
be awarded to the acts which take
first, second, and third places re-
spectively.
DECEMBER IS JOY MONTH
R-0 1141Id

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'n

Xi

!

ENDS TODAY
"SLATTERY'S
HURRICANE"
Plus "Massacre River"
STARTS SUNDAY!!
THE BIGGEST PICK-UP IN
ENTERTAINMENT HISTORY

I

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El'

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