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December 04, 1949 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-12-04

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PAGE 8J

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1949

Mustangs

Hand

Irish

Scare

Before

Falling,

27-20

{I

Irish Land
Two on Trib
A il-Nation
CHICAGO - (P) - Notre Dame
landed two berths and nine other
schools, including Princeton and
Santa Clara, each won one posi-
tion on the All-Players, All-Ameri-
ca football team announced yes-
terday by the Chicago Tribune.
Tht squad was chosen by 2,193
gridders and 17,098 votes were
recorded. The Tribune said the
participating players saw action
in 1,015 games. None was allowed
to vote unless he faced at least
one of his nominees on the field.
EACH TEAM polled, on an ave-
rage, named 29 different players
for the 11 positions with a total
of 1,129 picked on the ballots.
However, only 49 received voting
support from each of the teams
they played.
Notre Dame's selections were
End Leon Hart and Fullback
Emil Sitko. Sitko's backfield
mates were Army's Arnold Galif-
fa, Southern Methodist's Doak
Walker and North Carolina's.
Charles Justice.
Named along with Hart in the
line were J. A. Williams, Rice, at
end;- Bob Gain of Kentucky and
Holland Donan of Princeton,
tackles; Stanley West of Okla-'
homa and Vern Sterling of Santa
Clara, guards; and Clayton Ton-
nemaker of Minnesota, center.
Selected on the second team
were: Art Weiner, North Carolina,
and Dan Foldberg,° Army, ends;
Leo Nomellini, Minnesota, and
Thurman McGraw, Colorado A &
M, tackles Rod Franz; California,
and Don Mason, Michigan State,
guards; Joe Watson, Rice, center;
and Robert Williams, Notre Dame;
Eddie LeBaron, College of Pacific;
Lynn Chandnois, Michigan State;
and John Dottley, Mississippi,
backs.

Wolverines Surge Back
Swith Second Half Rally

Victors Complete Fourth
Straight Unbeaten Year
Barrett Skirts End for Winning Touchdown
After Rote Paces SMU to Final Period Tie

4

(Continued from Page 1)
first time since the start of the
game.
MICHIGAN STATE tied up the
game at 42-42 with five minutes to
play and again with two and a
half left before Skala's beautiful
underhand shot sent -the Wol-
verines back into the lead, 46-44.
With one minute remaining
the Spartans tried desperately
to overcome a 51-46 deficit but
the Michigan man-to-man de-
fense held strong as the game
ended 52-49.
- The first half started slowly
with both teams showing opening
game clumsiness. Not until three
and a half minutes of play had
elapsed was either team able to
sink a field goal. Then State's
Jim Snodgrass, the Spartan's top
scorer with 15 points, dropped in
a long two hand set shot and the
game began to pick up.
BOTH TEAMS played along
even until State began to pull
away from their 13-12 lead. Bill
Rapchak and Snodgrass then put
together five baskets that gave
the Spartans a 23-13 margin with
M' Riflemen
Defeat .Detroit

seven minutes to play in
half.

the1

VanderKuy and Morrill then
added three and two baskets
respectively to perform the same
trick for the Wolverines.
But the Spartans came to life
again and put together two field
goals and two charity tosses to
SPORTS
BOB SANDELL, Night Editor
pile up a 31-23 lead as the gun
sounded ending the first half.
The Wolverines were able to
work the ball into the Spartan's
man-to-man defense for 75 shots,
connecting on 21 of them for a
29.3 percentage from the field.
Michigan State compiled a slightly
better percentage, hitting 19 of 61

BACKBOARD BOTHER-Center Leo Vanderkuy was right behind
guard Hal "Lefty" Morrill in the scoring in last night's game at
East Lansing with 13 points. Leo was particularly effective in
controlling the backboards for the Wolverines.
Detroit Beats Montreal, 5-3;
Leafs, Bruins Also Triumph

MONTREAL - (/P) - Detroit's
Red Wings continued their tor-
rid league-leading pace in th'e
National Hockey League last night
with a 5-3 victory over Montreal
Canadiens before a record-break-
ing Montreal crowd of 14,511. The
win put the Red Wings ahead of
a scrambling threesome of Cana-
diens, Chicago Blackhawks and
Toronto Maple Leafs.
.* * *
BOSTON - (P) - The Boston
Bruins bunched all of their scor-
ing over a 14-minute stretch in

.
Chicago Blackhawks, 5-3, last
night before a 10,775 crowd at
the Boston Garden. It was the
visitors' first setback in their
last five National Hockey League
starts.

for a 30.1 percentage.
MICHIGAN (52) FG FT
Skala f.......... 3 0
McIntosh f ....... 2 2
Suprunowicz f 5....5 1
Olson f .......... 0 0
Vander Kuy c 6 1
Morrill g ......... 5 6
Murray g.........0 0
Doyle ..........0 0
T~OTAL4S......21 10

TORONTO-()-Goalie Turk
Broda, a stylish 189-pounds, re-
turned to National Hockey League
competition last night and helped
Toronto score a 2-0 shutout over
New York Rangers before a highly-
partisan crowd of 13,359 fans.
The Turk received a tremendous
hand from the crowd as the final
whistle went to signalize his fourth

By

55

Points

the final period to defeat the shutout of the season.

Sophomore Cinder Men Standout
In First Indoor Track Time Trials

V

By BILL CONNOLLY
Standouts returning from last
year's varsity track squad teamed
Ow ,wth sophomore runners mov-
ing up from the frosh squad of
last year to pace Don Canham's
thinclads through their first in-
door time trials yesterday.
Most significant fact noted in
the trials is that most of the men
who led the field in their special-
ties were either men who gained
valuable varsity experience as
sophomore runners last year, or
else this year's sophomores who
have moved up from Elmer Swan-
son's frosh squad.
* * *
OUTSTANDING performance of
the day was the blazing three-
quarter mile time turned in by
Don McEwen, the amazing sopho-
more who stole the Western Con-
ference cross-country crown from
Wisconsin's Don Gehrmann just a
month ago.
The Canadian ace will de-
finitely become one of the out-
standing distance runners in
Michigan track history, if not

in the history of inter-collegiate
competition.
Another outstanding sophomore
prospect is middle-distance man,
Aaron Gordon. The soph sprint-
ed through a 1000 yard race in
fine form, and finished well in
front of the field.
Canham will probably count
heavily on Gordon for strength in
the middle-distance events when
the indoor season opens in Jan-
uary.
JIM MITCHELL took both
hurdle events, but was pushed
across the finish line in both
events by his last year's running
mate, Don Hoover. Right behind
them was a newcomer, Bruno Boel-
ster, who will probably add addi-
tional depth in the timber events
this season.
Versatile Art Henrie was in
his usual form, as he bested the
field of dash-men by turning in
the best time in the 60 and
high-jumping six feet, one-half
an inch.
By nosing out Horace Coleman,

sophomore standout who tied with
Henrie, Eck Koutonen, Olympic
hop-step-and-jump artist, took a
first in the high jump.
* * *
JIM ACKERMAN nosed out
Henrie and Rod Warren to snap
the tape in the quarter-mile, and
Jus Williams, Captain of the 1950
Wolverine track squad, came
through in dependable fashion by
winning the 880.
In addition to Henrie's vic-
tory, the 60-yard dash was high-
lighted by the appearance of
Charlie Fonville and the fine
display of speed by John Wil-
cox, who looks as if he may have
that added punch in the sprints
that Canham has been searching
for.
Fonville won his heat in the
sprint just five minutes after he
had put in a hard work-out with
the shot. Charlie displayed the
fine form that set records for him,
and should be able to put in com-
petition this-his senior-year.
* * *
THE TIMES and performances
turned in were unusually good
for this early in the season, but
cinder coach Canham isn't being
too optimistic about the season's
outcome.
"The competition in the Big
Ten this year," he pointed out,
"will be the toughest it has ever
been."
"Men returning from last year's
Conference competition, com-
bined with a brand new field of
outstanding sophomore runners
will make things plenty tough for
any team this year," he added.

Michigan's rifle team defeated
the University of Detroit, 1375-
1320, in the first shoulder-to-
shoulder match held on the
Michigan range yesterday.
Sam Kalow took sharpshooter
honors with a high individual score
of 277 for theWolverines. Only
one point behind him was Don
Postma with 276. Martin Everitt
was only two points off the lead-
er with 275 and Doug Covert and
Morse Davis followed with 274 and
273 respectively.
The Detroit riflemen were
headed by Stan Smith, who
shot 275. Don Braddock was
runner-up with 273. Ten points
behind him, Jim Wolber hit the
target for 263. Rounding out
the Titan scoring were Frank
Wood who hit for 258 and Stan
Ramus, with 251.
The results of the match were a
big boost to the Wolverine rifle
team's hopes of copping their
next big match which will not
take place until after the Christ-
mas vacation. At that time they
will take on Ohio State and Michi-
gan Sate in a tri-league match.
The 'MI' marksmen are gunning
also for the Big Nine title in the
Western Conference Meet which
will climax the 1949-50 season.
Auburn Whips
Mighty_'Bam~a
BIRMINGHAM, Ala.-(P)-Au-
burn, winner of only one game
all season, scored the easy way,
added another touchdown on sheer
power and hung on like the Tiger
they are called to outplay and
upset mighty Alabama yesterday,
14-13.
Before this wild, fight-marred
game, Auburn was a low-rated
football team, supposed to have
only the throwing arms of Travis
Tidwell as an offensive weapon.
Auburn scored first, but Ala-
bama power was too much for the
score to remain that way and at
the half it was a 7-7 tie.

MICH.STATE!
Rapchak f ...
Dawson f ....
Cummins f .. .
Means f ......
Smith f ......
Steffen c .....
Finn c .......
Snodgrass g ..
Robbins g ..
Stauffer g ....
TOTALS ...

(49) FG
. . . 42
.6
. .. ..19

FT
2
1
0
1
0
2
1
3
1
0
11

PF
2
2
4
0
4
2
2
0
16
PF
3
4
4
0
0
3
1
2
1
2
20

TP
6
6
11
0
13
16
0
0
52
TP
14
5
2
1
0
2
3
15
7
0
49

Score at half: Michigan State
31, Michigan 23.
Free throws missed: Michigan
State-Dawson 2, Steffen 2, Snod-
grass, Finn, Cummins, Means.
Michigan-McIntosh 7, Supruno-
wicz 4, Vander Kuy 2, Murray 2,
Morrill.

MACK SUPRUNOWICZ...
.hit for 11
Jayvee Cagers
Dropped From
1949-50_Slate
Junior Varsity basketball has
suffered the same fate as 150
pound and Junior Varsity football
and has been dropped from Mich-
igan's sports calendar for the 1949-
50 campaign.
Head Coach Ernie McCoy gave
two main reasons - schedule dif-
ficulties and lack of court space-
for the elimination of the Jayvee
quintet.
Of the Big Ten schools only
Ohio State and Michigan State
are having JV teams again this
year. During the 1948-49 sea-
son the Wolverines met these
two schools along with Lawrence
Tech's B Team and Michigan
Normal.
The problem of keeping another
squad practicing on the limited
court space also confronted Mc-
Coy, and the lack of any adequate
solution was one of the contribut-
ing factors in the dropping of the
sport.
J. T. White, who handled the
coaching reins for the Jayvees last
year is helping Dave Strack with
the freshman team.

DALLAS-(M)-Notre Dame's
Fighting Irish pulled back from
the shock of a thundering South-
ern Methodist offense that had
them on the brink of defeat yes-
terday to drive 57 magnificent
yards for a touchdown that gave
them an undefeated, untied sea-
son and a 27-20 victory.
In one of the all-time thrillers
of Southwestern football history,
the men of Notre Dame stopped
a great SMU drive on the seven-
yard line with less than four
minutes to go to finish four years
unbeaten-the first time Notre
Dame accomplished such a glit-
tering feat.
* * *
SOUTHERN Methodist, picked
to lose by at least 28 points, bat-
tered and weary, put its greatest
game into this battle yesterday.
It latched onto the flying shirt-
tail of killer Kyle Rote, the great-
est player on the field, to give
Notre Dame its closest game of the
season.
Southern Methodist battled
without its great back, All-
America Doak Walker, who. was
on the sidelines in civilian
clothes because of a leg injury,
but Walker, in his palmiest days,
never played a greater game
than Rote.
Kyle smashed and crashed for
115 yards and he passed 24 times
and connected on 10 for 146 yards.
He scored all three SMU touch-
downs and barely missed another.

BACK CAME the Methodist
horde to drive with the kick off
from its 29 down to. the Notre
Dame four with Rote passing and
running until he reached the 28.
Here he was hit hard by the giant
Hart whilevattempting to pass and
had to leave the game.

IT WAS the first time
year for Notre Dame to be

,,

this
held

on even terms in the last half. In
fact, the Methodists had the bet-
ter of it in the final two periods.
And as the game ended, the mighty
Rote was battering to the Notre
Dame 41-yard line in another
great SMU surge.
A crowd of 75,457 fans Jarred
the giant Cotton Bowl to its
foundations, rocking and sway-
ing and goinig mad at the grid-
iron drama being unfolded be-
fore them.
The score was tied 20-20 early
in the fourth period as Notre
Dame gathered its Green-Shirted
Legions for that one great drive
that paid off. Emil Sitko, Francis
Spaniel, Leon Hart (the All-
America end who went to full-
back in the clinches) and Bill
Barrett ripped and tore the SMU
line. From the Methodist six the
fleet, driving Barrett whirled
around left end for a touchdown.
* * *

BEST HE'S HAD:

Leahy Lauds Guts, Character
Of Victorious Fighting Irish

Thirty Grid
JV's Receive 1
'49 Awards
The Michiigan coaching staff
has announced thirty JV football
awards for the 1949 season.
The Junior Varsity did not have1
any scheduled games but had the
more important but unheralded
role of showing the varsity the
opponents offensive maneuvers in
daily drills and scrimmages.
Hank Hatch would like all thet
men in the following list to re-]
port to him as soon as possiblec
to have their sweater measure-
ments taken.
The reserve award winners fol-
low: Richard Albertson, John D.
Anderson, Paul A. Anderson, Jer-
ome M. Burns, Donald D. Domke,
Arthur L. Dunne, James Eldridge,
John F. Gabel, Jack W. Hudnut,
James D. Jackson, Norman Jack-
son, Peter Kinyon, Floyd Lasser,
Robert E. Meader, George E. Ol-
son.
The list continues with: Russell
Ostermnan, Frederick Pickard,
Richard Ratcliff, David A. Ray,
Charles Reinke, Otho Robinson,
Jack W. Rose, Caleb Sandifer,
Reginald Sauls, James G. Skala,
Harry C. Smale, Gilbert Smith,
Ronald Stempien, Rostom Tan-
dourjian, Jack Vandenberg.

Sophomore Fred Bonn ers
stepped in andpassed $o H. N.
Russell on the Notre Dame five.
Russell lost one at center and
Benners was hurt attempting to
pass when rushed by Hart. Rote
then came back in to the game
and circled left end for two.
Then Kyle tried a jump pass
over the line that Jerry Groom
and Bob Lally intercepted in
unison.
That was the ball game.
SMU tried 35 passes and com-
pleted 17, getting five intercepted
by the Notre Dames. The Meth-
odists did just what they were
expected to do-fill the air with
footballs.
Tops at gathering in the passes
were the fleet, dangerous toy bull-
dogs - Johnny Champion - w1ho
caught six for 117 yards, and John
Milam, big Methodist wingman,
who snared three for 104.
Bill Wightkin caught three for ,
Notre Dame for 63 yards, one for
a touchdown.
SMU and Notre Dame tradedL
drives through half of the first
period but finally the Irish got
one under way that carried 73
yards for a score. The pay-off
was a pass from Williams to
Wightkin that ate up 42 yards and
brought a touchdown. Steve
Oracko kicked the extra point.

DALLAS, Tex. - (P) - Frank
Leahy said the Notre Dame team
that won a hair-raising 27-2.0 vic-
tory yesterday from Southern
Methodist was the greatest he ever
coached.
"It's got guts, it's got character.
"It'sthe greatest teamI've ever
coached."
The guts and character of which
Leahy spoke were evident in the
waning minutes of the game.
Southern Methodist had
roared from behind to tie the
score at 20-20. But the Irish-
The Fighting Irish-came back
after that second Mustang
touchdown in the final quarter
to score the one that gave them
a four-year undefeated string.
"It was one of th greatest games
I ever saw," SMU coach Matty

Bell told Leahy, as the Irish play-
ers stripped off their uniforms in
the dressing room.
"It was a great ball game,
Coach," said Southern Method-
ist's All-America Doak Walker.
Walker watched this one from
the bench, in street clothes. His
injured leg kept him on the side-
lines in the final game of his
collegiate career.
"I'm glad you weren't in there,"
Leahy told Walker.
Earlier in the Southern Method-
ist dressing room Bell stood at the
door as players came in. They
weren't happy about their loss.
"Fine game," Bell said. "Fine
game," as each man entered.
Leahy echoed the sentiments of
his star players-Leon Hart, Emil
Sitko and Bob Williams-when
he said "Kyle Rote is the most
underrated back in America."
i I

-TV

.

~~~~~~~1

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Basketball
Scores
CCNY 76, Lafayette 44
Yale 73, Rutgers 60
Purdue 70, DePauw 49
Kent State 49, Miami 40
Colgate 78, Toronto U. 35
Wisconsin 63, Marquette 48
Eastern Kentucky 51, Beliot 48
Cornell 72, Gettysburg 54
Kentucky 84, Indiana Central 61
Baldwin Wallace 66, Youngs-
town 46
N. Carolina 58, Richmond 50
Dartmouth 35, Vermont 28
Drake 57, Cornell (Ia.) 35
Temple 55, Vanderbilt 35
Minnesota 55, Loyola 51
Ohio State 68, DePaul 70

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Tickets, Postersi
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24 Hr. Service

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INCLUDED IN THE CHRISTMAS ISSUE:
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f Y'The Necklace

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