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December 03, 1949 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-12-03

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TWO

j

-THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, DECEMBER. 3. 1949

THE MICHIGAN W~~iIIV

SATRDA. DCEMR ~ 1L 2.

7

is

i A - , A

ANN ARBOR RAILROAD:
Halting of Local Line Would Affect Few

By TOHN NEUFELD
Daily Special Writer
(Editor's Note: This is the second
of two articles on the Ann Arbor
Railroad.)
If the Ann Arbor Railroad suc-
ceeds in stopping its passenger
service on its 300 mile line running
from Toledo to Frankfort, few
students will probably be af-
fected.
During 1947, only 62,000 pas-
sengers were carried an average
of 50 miles each. This figure does
not include the special football
trains which bring fans to the
close proximity of the Stadium.

NEITHER THE football trains
nor the auto ferry will be affected
by hearings now being held in
Lansing to determine the future
status of passenger trains.
The auto ferry operates from
Frankfort, on Lake Michigan,
to Manistique and Menominee
in the Upper Peninsula and also
to three Wisconsin towns.
In former days, before auto-
imobiles and interurban railroads
became important, the Ann Arbor
had an important function to per-
form. An average speed of 27 mph

Five Month Global Jaunt
TakesGrad 50,000 Miles
4-

(Continued from Page 1)

TRAVELING three weeks by rail
across India was a trying exper-
ience to Carnero.
"Train cars are all blocked off;
to get to the diner and back again,
you have to wait for station stops
-quite an exhausting procedure."
H euthinksthe educatedclass
there is "quite capable, but not
large enough." There aren't
enough qualified men to fill the
thousands of unmanned govern-
mental posts, he said.
And from his observations, Car-
nero regards Communism in India
as in a "fairly dormant" state, un-
udget Chief
To Talik Here
Charles B. Stauffacher, Assist-
ant Director of the Federal Bureau
of Budget will speak at 7:30 p.m.
Monday in the Henderson Room
of the League on "The Problems
of the Federal Budget."
Stauffacher will address a semi-
nar of the American Society for
Public Administration, which will
be open to the public.

like North Africa, where he noted
it to be quite active.
* * * *
IN SIAM; Carnero praised Bang-
kok, the capitol, as "the Orient's
garden spot-marvelous for tour-
ists. There's so much to see and
buy. And jeeps are as numerous
as flies, as in many other Eastern
cities I saw," he noted.
He was surprised at the rapid
modernization pace Asia is fol-
lowing. In Bangkok alone, he
noticed ten or twelve different
airlines.
In Australia, unbelievably prim-
itive cultures still flourish in the
western plains, Carnero observed.
He added that some tribes sell
boomerangs and wood trinkets to
passing train passengers - their
only means of livelihood.
FEELING STRONG kinships to-
ward Americans, Australians in
southeastern urban districts think
their future lies in copyilg U.S.
methods, Carnero said.
"But they are still weak in
natural resources, although vast
hydroelectric projects have been
initiated."
Pointing to the extremely low
cost of living there, Carnero feels
Australia is the place to go to get
the most out of low annual in-
comes.
FestiveSpirit
(Continued from Page 1)

and a stop every four miles did
not distract passengers of the Gay
Nineties, apparently.
In its pe'ak years of 1912-16,
the railroad was carrying as many
as 1,146,000 passengers yearly.
* * *
PRQF. EMERITUS Henry E.
Riggs, who was head of the civil
engineering department until 1930,
has written an instructive booklet
about his experiences as chief en-
gineer of the road from 1890 to
1895, entitled "The Ann Arbor
Railroad 50 Years Ago."
In his book, he describes the
transition of the "promoter-
built jerkwater line to. a real
railroad." At this time, the Hu-
ron River Bridge and the wooden
deck truss over Ann Arbor's
Main Street presented great
problems.
The boss thought the steam
shovel an "invention of the devil"
and Prof. Riggs had to work hard
to convince him that the shovel
was superior to a section hand.
* * *
PROF. RIGGS also describes
the early history of the railroad.
Four years before the first stretch
of the line was put in operation
in 1878, the building company
went bankrupt.
But a strike on Michigan
Central the next year gave new
impetus to further construction,
which would connect Ann Arbor
and Toledo, and thus make Ann
Arborites less dependent on the
Michigan Central line from De-
troit,
In its early days, the Ann Ar-
bor Railroad's growth paralleled
the development of Michigan.
Link after link of the road was
completed to facilitate communi-
cations with Michigan's north
woods.
THE RAILROAD is rich in in-
cidents that figure in Michigan
history, such as the strike in 1893,
which was followed by a four year
receivership.
The strike was caused when
two engineers refused to join the
newly organized Brotherhood of
Locomotive Engineers. The pres-
ident of the line told the
Brotherhood when they de-
manded the discharge of the
two engineers: "I am running
this Railroad, get out of here
and strike, damn you."
"This strike is notable as the
first one which called for action
by injunction against a labor
union," according to Prof. Riggs.
Less than a month after the
strike was declared, a U.S. cir-
cuit judge decided that such a
strikejinterfered with Interstate
Commerce and should therefore
cease.
Psychologists
Attend Meeting
Several membersofathe psychol-
ogy department have left Ann
Arbor to attend the meeting of the
Michigan Psychological Associa-
ion being held today at Michigan
State College.
Two panel discussions will make
p the program of the meeting.
Participating in a discussion on
linical psychology will be Prof.
Donald Marquis, chairman of the
psychology department, Prof.
Deorge Satter and Prof. E. L.
Kelly, both of the psychology de-
mrtment.
* *
PROF. RICHARD Blackwell, of
he psychology department and
roject director of the Vision Re-
earch Laboratory and Vision
ommittee Research, will take
>art in a discussion of industrial
>sychology.

Eugene Jacobson, Study Direc-
or of the Survey Research Cen-
er, will also attend the meeting.

Visiting Prof.
Sparks Confab
Of Actuaries
'Time for a (jange'
Says Illinois' Mehr
A self-described "suthern gentle-
man," Prof. Robert Mehr of the
University of Illinois' economics
department, flew into town yes-
terday to address a meeting of the
Michigan Actuarial Club.
Though the subject of his talk
was "I Don't Know Anything
About Actuarial Science, but ... ," 1
Prof. Mehr showed that he did
have some definite ideas about
the men who, among other things,
determine the premiums to be
paid on insurance policies. j
"ACTUARIES," he said, in the
slow drawl of a Philadelphian
raised in Alabama, "Actuaries are
in a dungeon, watching only
mathematics andenot keeping up
with economic developments."
After pointing out tha't in-
surance companies have been
using the same fundamental
policies for 200 years, Prof.
Mehr declared it was time for a
change.
Specifically he urged the intro-
duction of a policy designed to
insure against old age, which
would pay nothing if the person
died before he was 65 years old,
but would furnish a steady income
for a policyholder after that age.
1--,I

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .50 1.02 1.68
3 .60 1.53 2.52
4 .80 2.04 4.80
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
SaturdayMis 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
1- -
PERSONAL
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
209 S. State
Phone 8161 )1P
RUBY - The housemother has the
shoes. She doesn't allow THAT!
Rudolph.
WEEK-ENDS still open for girls de-
siring dates with football star. Call
Dutch 34707. Avoid Christmas rush! !
- - - ----- -34P
M. B. EARNED all A's for 6 straight
semesters, We taught him how. We
can teach you how too. ust send
25c to 129 Tyler House, East Quad.
__s__,_37P
FOR RENT
BRING YOUR WEEKEND GUESTS to
the Pierce Transit Home, 1133 E. Ann.
Phan(- 8144. ) R
.r-

1

BUSINESS SERVICES
PHOTO-E N GRAV ING
24-hour service at Reasonable Charges
On High Quality Engraving
Michi an Daily. 420 Maynard
Notice the S.L. Candidates' Posters
NEARLY NEW SHOP. Fur and cloth
coats, formals, suits, dresses. 10911 E.
Washington, over Dietzel's. Phone
24669. )27B
WASHING AND OR IRONING done in
my own home. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020. ) 1B
SHIRTS - Nine hour service (by re-
quest), Three day service (regular
service). Ace Laundry, 116 S. Uni-
vrsity. )2113
C'~r~tE'1ING tCAJNDS inscribed iil colors
lOc echcl or $.1 00 Per box. 'T. A. Early,
402 Observatory. Phone 2-8106. )8l
EFlICIENT, EXPERT, PROMPT, Type-
writer repair service. Mosely's Type -
writer and Supply Company. 2141" E.
Washington. Phone 5-888. )5B
HAVE YOUR TYPEWRITER REPAIRED
by the Office Equipment Service Com-
pany, 215 E. Liberty. )16B
-PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR.--
Van Doren Clarinet Reeds
Box of 25 -- $4.50
New and Used Instruments
209 E. Washington )413
HELP WANTED
WANTED -Couple wanted for house -
work In exchange for board and
room. Call mornings or evenings.
7979)
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED-2 or 3 riders to go to Los
Angeles, one way, Christmas vacation.
References. Ph. 7601 evenings and
weekends. ) 20T
RIDERS WANTED--For one way to
Miami, Florida. Will leave Dec. 16.
Call Keller,_9183. )21Tr
WANTED--Ride to Richmond, Va. or
vicinity. Xmas. For student couple.
Share expenses. Call 7781. )18r
WAN'TED-- Ride to Quebec, Canrado or
vicinity, Christmas. Call 22218. )16T
WANTED-A ride to Indianapolis or
vicinity on 16th or 17th. Share ex-
penses. Call D. Kneip, 2-2521 Ext. 108.
) 22T

LOST AND FOUND FOR SALE
S a ats and vita-
g:ein.ltVei Wt1 dr(~uad ad imm ipill inicluded. S$15. Phone 8221.
Au I Fl l i. h\'at 11:413(Mica"o Cl-lEN ''U -I' longer 1lasting because
2- 0. it Is genuiniltacquer., Matching lip-
LOS7-COn., h:;ic1,dr ii .in l n 1 sticks in fashiion colors. Calkins-
LOST--e .d on Michin Dg el chertru Co. South State at
cu.I mid. Pleasereturn1 to li. North University. )5
11. Megrod at te Sludent Publica- CC S _T -
tions; Building. COUSINS
On State Street
LOST-Chronrgraph wauch i n IM very fine nylon mesh hose. Run re-
Building. Personal value. Reward. sistant. $1.25. All sizes. Selection of
Phone 7039 )97L colors- )2
LOST - On: Parker -51 old cap NEW WEBSTER-CHICAGO 3-speed port-
(, Tight dent) ,Wble baise. Lost be - _ale-phono. $67.50. Ph. 9400. Don.__)12
twee11 Pharmcey school and W. En. DELICIOUS APPLES -- Honey, fresh
school n M"onary p in. Reward, cider. Deliveries. 1350 Hogback Road,
Proner976. ) GL Ph. 2-9041. )11
LOST--ianuondsetting for malnn'sring, NEW COMB. high fidelity amplifier,
ira *~ hr ' buldirg. 61,6 v".0 wtt output. 50-1500 rcycle.
( ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~11( ',,1111. 8 I. ni )9~1 te Opre-amplihier included.
' AiT . . isPhonle 2932. )13
WANTED u uUY GVE A LIVE BIRD for CHRISTMAS.
USD C r' rea}oie -,9 u'""" baby Parakeets, Canaries, and
boD UY A ua o Cea Ol lbird supplies and cages. 562 S. Sev-
2-_ ItS. ,,,W enth near W. Madison. ___ )28
TXMAS 6TORY of year! "The Indossol-
't.ie -39. 2T 0 ranudss ou. tible 'r ar." Just out. 35c. Campus
Poe-41Ih Vod W Book Store. )90
WANTED TO RENT $60.00 BLUE SERGE SUIT, size 39, for
only $25.00. Worn only once. Fred,
WANTED -Garar in vinity of J, ttl r- 2-4401, 408 Wenley House.
so ii or Maynard. Call 2-9118. D)irk Un a te Fu iur
Un pain ted Furn iture
OAEA(; :,ill l ciity of1Stateand Moll- Complete stock of 4 drawer and 5
roe. 'all Ylr;9:'Y.12drawer- chests, night stands and
FO AE- tables, chairs, coffee tables, desks,
FOR SALE breakfast tables. bookacases a'n utiifty
racks. All made from smooth, bright
1l made, lumber. Save money-paint it your-
W1-hT1 l1"I? il i i- r AFrl adio self.
P EERiLSS131 Modlel A Ford. Radio GI LL LUM BER CO.
and iarIrbenw Cl 2 oMi
Don her. Lx m -in sow. Call 524 So. Main St. Phone 2-4555
on FMx3ort, 2132.tl 11Where the Greater Number
EXVCOM hlighJ ufidelity amp~lifier, _ Get Their Lumber)8
(;6~, 0 at. ulo. 0-500 yce Y OR.SALE-Set of formal tails. Slz
Filter and pre-ampidl icr included. 1or I3- Calf2184. i ). 6
Phone 2-_9382. ) 14 3.or35Cal224.)8
RUBBER FOOTWEAR SPECIALS - Toe
MACHiy: lColbination watch, stop- rubbers, $1.49; 4 buckle dress galosh-
wawchtree wother intrstinlg, i towio- es, $3.75; low zipper galoshes, $3.49;
fusi,:dl. New "1 ee Si high z ipper galoshes, $4.25. Open un-
$ o' . til 6 p.m. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-
sIC' l l tA1 )NT'S of 11 " o r 1TIM1E3 lng>ton. }
uW ;rt $6 .90Lat the newssAnod----only
$:i Ioree tthe caine llctimYe as "ENIRE T UX AND TAILS OUTFIT -
a Chririt of 'LIMI;r 4LIFE Sixe 34.Phone 2-5253 927 E. Ann.
af $6.00. Additional gifts: TIME $4, BARGAIN - Matched wedding rings.
LI1 $30.75. To stdents only. Through Engagement ring 20 pt. diamond with
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Agency. Phone 2-82-42 for futll inl- monds. Perfect condition. $150.
terznation. )3 Phone 25-8762 after 6:00 p.m.

t

University of Michigan
THEATER GUILD
presents

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

MESSIAH
Sat., Dec. 10, 8:30
Hill Auditorium
CHLOE OWEN, Soprano
ANNA KASKAS, Contralto
DAVID LLOYD, Tenor
OSCAR NATZKA, Bass
CHORAL UNION
300 Voices
SPECIAL ORCHESTRA
50 Players
Lester McCoy, Conductor
0
Repeat Performance
Sunday, Dec. 11, 2:30
.
Tickets, either performance,
tax included
Main floor and first balcony, 70c
Top balcony, 50c
Now on sale at University Musical
Society, Burton Memorial Tower.

these, and as a result they usually
buy their immediate needs from
local merchants.
The lagest part of the decora-
tions are done by the various
units themselves. Lane Hall, the
Union, and the League have an-
nually set up large trees adorn-
ing their lobbies and lounges
In every dormitory lounge will
stand at least an eight-footer, ten-
derly de-corated by residents at
least two weeks in advance of the
Christmas vacation.
Seven Appointed
To Honor Council
Seven men. were recently ap-
pointed to the Engineering Honor
Council by the Engineering Coun-
cil.
The men appointed and their
offices are Leo J. Romzick, chair-
man; John A. Harrington, secre-
tary; Stanford Crapo, Joseph N.
Crawford, William Morris, John
Smedley and Stanley Wiggin.
SHORT ORDERS
and
Full Course Meals
TRIANGLE RESTAURANT
808 South State

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the Office of the
Assistant to the President, Room 2552
Administration Building, by 3:00 p.m.
on the lay preceding publication
(11:00 a.m. Saturdays).
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1949
VOL. LX, No. 59
Notices
Choral Union Ushers: Regular
series ushers report Sat., Dec. 10,
at 7:45 for the Messiah Concert.
Extra series ushers report Sun.,
Dec. 11 at 1:45 for the Messiah
Concert.
Messiah Ushers: Extra ushers
are needed for both concerts. Ap-
ply at Hill Auditorium box office,
5- to 6 p.m., Mon., Dec. 5, or Tues.,
Dec. 6.
Bureau of Appointments:
The Director of Personnel of
the Detroit Public Schools will be
at the University, on Thurs., Dec. 8,
to speak to prospective teachers
regarding opportunities in the De-
troit schools for the next few
years. A general meeting for this
man, 5474, and register for future
possible evenings.
United World Federalists: State
Political Action Meeting, 2 p.m.,
chorus bus at 12:15 p.m. and or-
chestra bus at 5 p.m.
To All Members of the Faculty:
The Intramural Sports Building
will be open from 8 p.m. on for the
exclusive use of members of the
teaching staff (full or part time)
and their wives. Swimming; bad-
minton, volleyball, squash, golf,
basketball, etc.
Since continuance of this fac-
ulty sports night depends upon the
turn out, all those interested are
urged to attend or call Mrs. Eite-
(Continued on Page 4)
BOX OFFICE OPEN 1:15 P.M.
7p]

ROMEO and
JULIET
Dec. 3, 4 8 P.M.
PATTENGILL AUDITORIUM
Tickets 1.20, 90c, 60c
On Sale in Administration Bldg.
lobby and in Pattengill Auditorium
on the nights of performances.

I1

i

DRUG COMPANY
900 S. State

I'

MICHIGAN ENDING TODAY
35c until 5 P.M.
:, M f RERE M AN YOU'VENR SF M ENBFOF *A F1

.4';

f

HOLI DAY
CAMERA SPECIAL
XMAS G I FTS

WN

I

RISE STEVENS
CONCERT
POSTPONED TO
MON., DEC 12 30
Tickets at University Musical Society, Burton Tower
5-r- ---- -wr-r r t -r rr
DA NCE TO NIGH T
MASONIC TEMPLE BALLROOM
327 South Fourth
STAG or DRAG
9-12 Top Band & Vocals by Delores

WARNER RROt
1" .' _ "UrNmOmr-ER REtEAS1
APR C'mm"Ary
w% mm'l'mb UK

I

ri LAST NIGHT
"FAMLYPOR T RAIT" 0
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE CURTA IN)8 P.M.
U Admission $1.20-- 90c - 60c (tax incl.)
Box Office Open 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
Coming Next Tuesday -- 4 One-Act Plays

I

4'

----

r)

ik

C:
OR
Cine
From

Nr
TAG LIAVIN I
G OIBIl CO RRA DI
infIII ACTS
The sforg is told by
OEEMS TAYLOR

STAGE COACH INN
Have you any Parties, Banquets
or Receptions?

E

ENINGI S UNDAY

I I

PHEUM
ema Triumphs
All the World

Miniature
TOM & JERRY
Animation
"Mouse Cleaning"

Ri

i __

i

MATS 25c

NIGHTS 35c

.-Last Times Today

35c to 5 P.M.

C

C01

_ CP

BALLROOM
MICHIGAN UNION
9-12 P.M.

TWO JOY MONTH HITS!
NOW SHOWING
at 1:30 - 5:20 & 8:30 P.M.
uoABBOI
'O'-
IR SD .

Continuous from 1 P.M.
'The
GERALDINE BROKS Tomorrow!
-STARTS SUNDAY

I

I

Sat.,

Dec. 3rd and Sat., Dec.
(No Membership Dance Fri., Dec. 9th)

10th
A _n

"DARINGLY DISPLAYED
. ..TO BE SEEN AND
SEEN AGAIN!
-N.Y. Times

11

Plus! at 3:30 - 6:40 & 9:50

fill

III

11111

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