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November 30, 1949 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-11-30

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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE T

Final AP Grid Poll Rates Irish

'National Cham ps'

/N .

Hart Gets Heisman Trophy
As Top Player of Season

DANGER! MEN WORKING:
Heyliger Rebuilds Hockey Squad
9* , *

Michigan Drops to Seventh,
Sooners Retain Second Slot

AP Poll

I

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK--(P)--Leon Hart,
Notre Dame's great end, had an-
other honor heaped upon his broad
back last night when he was an-
nounced as the winner of the Heis-
man Memorial trophy for being
"the outstanding college football
player of 1949."
The award is made annually by
the downtown A.C. which polls
sports writers and broadcasters
throughout the nation on their se-
lection.
THE SIX-FEET four-inch, 248-
pound husky from Turtle Creek,
Pa., won in a breeze with a total
of 975 points.
In second place came Charley
(Choo Choo) Justice, North Caro-
lina's fine back, with 272 points.
Doak Walker, Soutlern Method-
ist's triple threat back who won
the Heisman trophy last year, was
third with 229 followed by Arnold
Galiffa, Army, 196 and Bob Wil-
liams of Notre Dame, 189.
* * '*

try voted the Irish end as its No.
1 selection.
A sure bet for All-America
ranking, Hart will add the
Heisman trophy to his Maxwell
Memorial football club silver-
ware. The Philadelphia Club
named the all-around perform-
er, great on defense as well as
offense, as the winner of its
trophy 12 days ago.
He is the second lineman to
capture the Heisman prize in the
15 years the trophy has been
awarded. Larry Kelley, Yale's
famed end, won it in 1936.
Hart also is the third Notre
Dame player to bring home the
silver. Angelo Bertelli came
home first in 1943 and Johnny
Lujack won it in 1947.
Sixth place in this year's ballot-
ing went to Eddie Lebaron, an out-
standing quarterback with College
of Pacific. Lebaron received 122
points. Clayton Tonnemaker, Min-
nesota's massive center, w a s
seventh with 81, and Emil (Red)
Sitko, Notre Dame fullback, was

EVERY SECTION of the coun- eighth with 79.
Detroit Alumni Club To Honor
FootballSquad at Annual Bust

By BOB SANDELL
Now that Coach Vic Heyliger
has finally managed to get his
Wolverine hockey squad on the
ice and practicing, he finds him-
self faced with a rebuilding prob-
lem that he hasn't had to contend
with for several seasons.
Not that the "crying towel" need
be brought out for the popular
Michiganmentor, but the fact is
that Vic lost five men last year
MSC Elects Captain
EAST LANSING, Mich.-(P)
-Leroy Crane, spunky defen-
sive back from Mt. Pleasant,
was named to captain the 1950
team at the Michigan State
College football banquet here
last night.
Crane, a 19-year-old junior,
was kept out of competition the
last part of the season when he
reinjured a bad knee.
that were the nucleus of some of
the finest college hockey teams
that Michigan has ever produced.
* * *
LOSS OF veteran performers
like forwards Al Renfrew, Wally
Gacek, and Gordie McMillan, and
defensemen Connie Hill and Dick
Starrak are not easily made up.
These five campaigners had three
and four years of experience, and
their departure from the Wolver-
ine scene leaves a big gap to be
filled.
But the picture isn't so dark
as it might appear on the sur-
face, for Michigan's "other" line
of last year is returning intact.
This trio of Wally Grant, Neil
Celley, and Gil Burford, which
could hardly be classed as the
second line last winter, forms
one of the fastest and most po-
tent scoring aggregations in col-
lege hockey.
* * *
OF THE THREE, Grant is prob-
ably the big gun, being selected on
the All-American team the past
two years and captain of the cur-
rent Wolverine squad. Heyliger has
no problem picking his first line
with this bunch still around, but
the second offensive combination
is definitely going to lack experi-

ence and will have to develop as
the season moves along.
Right now Heyliger expects to
use three sophomores on his sec-
ond line of attack with Bob
Hethcott centering b e t w e e n
wingers Ron Roberts and Paul
Pelow. All three were on last
year's frosh squad, and are class-
ed as excellent prospects.
THE THIRD LINE will probably
remain as last year with Al Bas-
se' and Joe Marmo combining
with center Lennie Brumm. This
threesome improved tremendously
as last season progressed and
should operate even more effi-
ciently this winter.
Heyliger's biggest problem
won't present itself until the
second semester rolls around
when Jack McDonald, Michi-
gan's goal tender for the past
three years. will have exhausted
his eligibility.
Hal Downs, a transfer student
from Fort Devens College in the
East is the one who will most like-
ly replace him, but again that old
bugaboo creeps in . . . he has little
experience.
ROSS SMITH and Bob Fleming
will be counted on to handle the
big share of the defensive work
withshelp from newcomers Gra-
ham Cragg and Ed May.
John Griffin was expected to
return this season, but at the
present he is in the hospital with
a virus infection and his hockey
future is uncertain.
Coach Heyliger is definitely not
pessimistic of the team's chances,
but feels that a lot of hard work is
ahead if the Wolverines are to
make a respectable s h o w i n g
against the lineup of formidable
opponents that they will face.
McDonald's replacement in
the nets could very well spell the
difference between a good and
bad season, but that is merely
conjecture.
Certainly no one player will be
charged with the team's successes
or failures, and if the young new-
comers come through in expected
fashion, there is little doubt that
Michigan will again be a strong
contender for national honors.

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - (R) - For the
third time in the past four years,
Notre Dame has been voted the
Nation's No. 1 football power by
sports writers and sportscasters
taking part in the Associated Press
poll.
In the ninth and final ballot of
the '49 season, 172 out of 248 ex-
perts plumped for the fighting
Irish from South Bend, who will
be working on a 37-game unde-
feated string when they close
against Southern Methodist on
Saturday at Dallas.
Oklahoma's powerful Sooners
nosed out California for second
place, with Army fourth and Rice
fifth.
* * *
MICHIGAN, which led the pa-
rade a year ago by a narrow mar-
gin over Notre Dame, dropped to
seventh.
Figured on a point basis (10
for first place selection, 9 for
second, etc.) Notre Dame topped
the contenders with 2,402, com-

,

T

v-

pared with 2,018 for Oklahoma,
1,900 for California, 1,838 for
Army, and 1,062 for Rice.
California, idle last week after
having clinched the Pacific Coast
Championship, polled more first
place votes than Oklahoma-40 to
18-but more widespread support
for the Sooners boosted them past
the Golden Bears into the second
spot.
MOST SURPRISING, perhaps,
was the fact that Army's impres-
sive 38-0 rout of Navy convinced
only 12 critics that the Cadets
were the best team going.'
That Rice, champion of the
Southwest Conference, did not
receive a single first place vote
may offer additional evidence
that sectional pride is having
less influence on the poll.
Ohio State, Big Nine represent-
ative in the coming Rose Bowl,
placed sixth with 998 points, Mich-
igan seventh, 848, Minnesota
eighth, 522, Louisiana State ninth,
516, and College of Pacific tenth,
248.
LOUISIANA STATE vaulted into
the select group at the very end
by virtue of its 21-0 victory over
Tulane. College of Pacific made
it by slaughtering California Poly
88-0, beating out Kentucky for the
10th spot by 26 points.
Unhappily for the bowl opera-
tors, neither Notre Dame, No. 1,
nor Army,.No. 4, is interested in
post-season football. Based on
the final vote, there appears lit-
tle to choose between the Jan. 2
attractions lined up for the Rose
and the Sugar Bowls.
The Rose will match California,
No. 3, with Ohio State, No. 6; the
Sugar brings together Oklahoma,
No. 2, and Louisiana State, No. 9.
Rice, No. 5, tackles North Caro-
lina, No. 16, in the Cotton Bowl at
Dallas. Kentucky, No. 11, and

VIC HEYLIGER
... hockey coach

AP SPORT FLASHES

1. Notre Dame (172) 2,402
2. Oklahoma (18) 2,018
3. California (40) 1,900
4. Army (12) 1,838
5. Rice 1,062
6. Ohio State 998
7. MICHIGAN 848
8. Minnesota 522
9. Louisiana State 516
10. College of Pacific (4) 248
The Second Ten-11. Kentucky,
222; 12. Cornell, 188; 13. Villanova,
(2), 148; 14. Maryland, 134; 15
Santa Clara, 128; 16. North Caro-
lina, 106; ,17. Tennessee, 82; 18.
Princeton, 46; 19. Michigan State,
30; 20. Missouri and Baylor, each
20.
Others receiving votes: Virginia
18; Duke 14; Pennsylvania, 10;
Stanford, 8; Wofford, Tulane, Wil-
liam and Mary and Southern
Methodist, each 6; Texas, Texas
Christian and North Carolina
State, each 3; Dartmouth, Wyo-
ming, Southern California, UCLA,
Vanderbilt, each 2;

The University's Alumni Club of;
Detroit will hold its annual ban-1
quet for the Michigan football
team at 6:30 this evening in the
Motor City's Statler Hotel.
Head Coach Bennie Oosterbaan
will be the principle speaker of the
traditional bust that will feature
' the awarding of 'M' rings to each
of the seniors on the squad.
THEN EACH of the 14 players
who ended their gridiron careers
at Michigan this year will intro-
duce each other and carry on the
speaking chores.
The announcement will also
be made of this year's winner of
the George Patterson Award to
the gridiron senior with the
highest scholastic average for
his four years of college.

To line Coach Jack Blott will
fall the honor of introducing to the
alums and fans assembled for the
big occasion the famous Michigan
tackle dynasty the three Wistert
brothers.
Francis, Albert and Alvin Wis-
tert will all be brought together
again in the annual post-season
Buses carrying football let-
termen to the Alumni banquet
in Detroit will leave the Union
at 4:15 this afternoon.
-Bennie Oosterbaan
bust. Each of the brothers played
an important part in three of the
greatest periods in Michigan foot-
ball history and each made All-
American at the tackle position.

CLEVELAND-The new bosses
of the Cleveland Indians discov-
ered they had inherited a pair of
headaches from the Bill Veek re-
gime.
FIRST-Smooth fielding second
baseman Joe Gordon has informed
them he wants to quit and play in
the Pacific Coast League. Gordon,
who is 34, slumped this past sea-
son, but still socked 20 homers.
SECOND-Satchel Paige, one of
baseball's all-time top crowd at-
tractions, is on the doubtful list.
Manager Lou Boudreau says the
aging Negro pitcher's bad stomach
might make him a bad risk on the
1950 roster.
Boudreau said yesterday:
"Joe's not washed up. The best
series he had last season was in
Detroit the last three days. I
don't know what he has in mind,
but I certainly hope he decides
to come back."
However, Gordon insisted at his
home in Eugene, Oregon, that he
wanted to !pull out of the Tribe's
line-up. Portland he said would
be a good hookup because it was
close to his home. He emphasized
that it's not a matter of ill will
with the Cleveland management.

Somebody asked Boudreau to
explain pitcher Paige's position,
and he replied:
"Satch is a real problem. I think
he could help us'in relief, but will
he be physically able? I am afraid
we won't know about Satch until
next spring."
* * *
PHILADELPHIA-The Dec. 12
10-round match between welter-
weight champion Sugar Ray Rob-
inson and George (Suger) Costner'
of Camden, N.J., was postponed
yesterday until some time next
year.
Promoter Phil Glassman said
the postponement was caused by a
shoulder injury suffered by Rob-
inson.

Santa Clara,
Orange Bowl

No. 15, meet in the
at Miami.

. . . . .. .

I

II

NHL Standings

-1

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Detroit
Montreal
Toronto
Chicago
Boston
New York

w
12
9
7
6
5
4

L
4
6
8
8
9
8

T P GF
4 27 66
4 22 47
4 18 56
4 16 55
5 15 48
6 14 36
GAMES

GA
51
31
51
54
68
53

3

MINUTE

TRIAL

AT

TODAY'S,

Montreal at New York
Boston at Detroit

(Continued from Page 2)
on "Contact Stresses." All inter-
ested persons welcome.
Physical-Inorganic hemistry
Seminar: 4:07 p.m., Wed., Nov. 30,
2308 Chemistry. Mr. W. B. Hillig,
"Electronic Structure of Cerium
Metal Modifications." Mr. H. W.
Habgood, "Atomic Polarization."
Speech 35: Classes will not meet
Wed., Nov. 30. Open House at the
University of Michigan Speech
Clinic will be held from 7:30-9
p.m., Wed., Nov. 30, for all Speech
35 students.
School of Education Testing
Program results may be picked up
Wednesday, Nov. 30 between the
hours of 8 and 12 in 1437 U.E.S.
The University Extension Service
announces:
Living in the Later Years II.
This course is a continuation of
Living in the Later Years I. It is
designed for those people in mid-
dle age and later maturity who
wish to learn how to develop their
older years in a satisfying, useful,
and healthful manner. It is also
of value to persons who are inter-
ested in the problems of aging and
the development of community re-
sources for older citizens. Four of
the eight sessions in Part II are
devoted to the subject of creative
aging; other sessions will take up
social security services, vocational
opportunities and the older work-
er, legal problems of the older per-
son, and community programs for
older people. Sessions meet at 7:30
p.m. on Thursdays, beginning Dec.
1, in 165 Business Administration
Building, Monroe at Tappan. Reg-
istration, $5. Enrollment may be
made at the Dec. 1 session.

Concerts
University Symphony Orchestra,
Wayne Dunlap, Conductor, will
appear in its annual winter concert
at 8:30 p.m., Thurs., Dec. 1, Hill
Auditorium. Harold Haugh, Asso-
ciate Professor of Voice in the
School of Music, will be the soloist
in -Benjamin Britten's Les Illumi-
nations. Other works on the pro-
gram: Overture to Aristophanes'
Comedy "The Wasps' by
Vaughan-Williams, November
Woods by Arnold Bax, a n d
Dvorak's Symphony No. 4 in G
(Continued on Page 4)

Announcing ..
39c LUNCHSPECIAL
ENTREE BREAD and BUTTER
VEGETABLEBEVERAGE
POTATO
J. D. Miller's Cafeteria
211 South State Phone 2-8315

CALKINS-FLETCH ER

Tomorrow

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I

in the

The Georgia Tech College Inn in Atlanta, Georgia,
is a favorite haunt of the Georgia Tech students.
That's because the Georgia Tech College Inn is a
friendly place, always full of the busy atmosphere
of college life. There is always plenty of ice-cold
Coca-Cola, too. For here, as in university gather-
ing spots everywhere-Coke belongs.

BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE
ANN ARBOR COCA-COLA

COCA-COLA COMPANY av
BOTTLING COMPANY

For Sale, To Rent, Wanted,
Lost & Found, Transportation or
Personal Columns in the
CLASSIFIED SECTION

1949, The Coca-Cola Company

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It's Lost,
You Say?

Don't Despair,
Try Our Way!

DAILY
CLASSIFIED

N EW
SHAVEMASTER
A FACTORY EXPERT will be in our store demon-
trating the new Sunbeam Shavemaster TOMORROW,
Thursday, December 1, from 9:30 A.M. to 5:30 P.M.

of

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