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November 05, 1949 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-11-05

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Twa

THE MlC H1AN DAILY

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1949

I U

Nehru Heard
On WUOM
RelayPickup
Results of the attempted pickup
by WUOM of a broadcast origi-
nating from the University of Wis-
consin yesterday were satisfac-
tory, although the experiment was
not a complete success, accord-
ing to Prof. Waldo Abbott, WUOM
director.
Pandit Nehru's address, which
was relayed from Madison to Ann
Arbor and other FM- educational
broadcast stations, was picked up
here although fadeouts and static
interfered with reception.
SIMILAR network hookups have
been highly successful along the
eastern seaboard, Prof. Abbott
added.
"Plans for the Big Ten net-
work ae just beginning -- in
about two weeks we will make a
second test, reversing the di-
rection of the relay from Ann
Arbor to Wisconsin."
The weak link in the relay set-
up seems to be on the long haul
from Delafield, Wis., across Lake
Michigan to Grand Rapids Prof.
Abbott explained.
POOR WEATHER and tropo-
spheric conditions on the lake
probably caused most of the
trouble, according to reports of
radio engineers.
Another possible setback was
the quality of receiving equip-
ment at the Grand Rapids relay
station, the WUOM director
added.
In the near future WUOM will
increase its transmission power
which should carry broadcasts
from here across the Lake to Dela-
field, Prof. Abbott declared.
Coeds To Be
Granted New
Scholarships
Thirteen scholarships of $200
each will be awarded to University
coeds this year and again in 1950
by th3 University Alumnae Coun-
cil.
Funds for the new scholarships
were secured by a recent "Fash-
ionscope" program in Detroit, held
under a-lumnae sponsorship.
PROCEEDS FROM this show
are also being used for contribu-
tions to Henderson House, a wom-
en 's 'cooperative house given to
the University"1" tihe Alumnae
Council several years ago.
The scholarships will be
awarded on the basis of need,
academic potential, character
and personality. Details on stu-
dent applications for the awards
will be announced within a few
weeks.

'Red Shoes' Ballet

RED SHOES-Moira Shearer stars in the ballet scenes in "The
Red Shoes," prizewinning British musical which will be shown
at a local theatre next week. Also featured in the full-length ballet
portion of the film is the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra under
the baton of Sir Thomas Beecham. The technicolor romance has
been named one of the ten best films of the year by the National
Board of Review. A special camera technique had to be developed
to catch the rapid dancing of Miss Shearer, who at one point
whirls through 100 pirouettes in quick succession.
IQ DRAWBACKS:
Graich Relates Defects
Of In1"Itelligence Qizze~s
- 0

Policy on SL
Election Told
ByEast Quad
East Quadrangle's Election
Committee has announced its pol-
icy regarding Student Legislature
elections.
The Committee plans a cam-
paign of Quad-wide publicity to
encourage men to vote, according
to Quad Council President Ray
Litt, '52E.
The Committee plans to dis-
tribute to all residents informative
bulletins containing explanations
of the functions of SL and of the
Hare System of voting. Statements
by all East Quad candidates on
important issuesare also forth-
coming, Litt added.
He said the bulletin will also ex-
plain theCouncilfeeling that East
~Quad should be adequately repre-
sented on SL and therefore why,
when evaluating all candidates,
the resident should consider Resi-
dence Hall men as having an add-
ed qualification.
"A rally open to all candidates
will be conducted as a panel dis-
cussion, with a moderator and au-
dience participation," Litt said.
He emphasized that the Coun-
cil "will urge all men in the East
Quad to vote for the best candi-
dates, regardless of residence."
Litt said that because of lack of
space, there will be no posters in
the main corridors of the Quad-
rangle. "Publicity. in the individ-
ual houses will be under the juris-
diction of the house councils," he
added.
New Art Print
CentersBegun
University Extension Center and
Audio-Visual Education Center
have now established three out-
state distribution points for art
prints.
In this way, schools may save
shipping charges involved in
sending the reproductions from
Ann Arbor.
CENTERS HAVE been estab-
lished in Saginaw, Flint afld West
Branch. Similar plans are now
being made for Western Michigan
and the Upper Peninsula.
In Saginaw, teachers may ob-
tain the prints through the
Saginaw County Audio-Visual
Education Center. In Flint, the
county librarian is cooperating
by delivering the prints to
Genesee County schools through
the Bookmobile.
At West Branch, the Ogemaw
County school commissioner will
circulate the prints.
Art reproductions were made
available to rural schools in 1948.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .50 1.02 1.68
3 .60 1.53 2.52
4 .80 2.04 4.80
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
FOR SALE
TWO MAIN FLOOR patrons tickets for
Cleveland Orchestra, Phone 2-5152.
_62
HOLTON BARITONE SAXOPHONE -
Very good condition, $125."William
Jagger, 218 N. Division. Ph. 2-4097.
DOUBLE HOLLYWOOD BED - Good
condition, complete, $30 Single maple
bed, mattress, coil springs, $18. Wal-
nut drop-leaf dining table, $20. Ma-
hognay buffet $35. Speckhard. Phone
2-8365. )59
Juilliard's finest sanforized
washable corduroy skirts in
wonderful new autumn colors.
$8.95
COUSINS
on State Street )2
COMPLETE LINE-Pipes and smoking
supplies-featuring poches, pipe and
cigarette lighters and wide selection
of the best tobaccos.
CALKINS-FLETCHER
at State and N. University )5
SPECIAL REDUCED STUDENT RATES
available on LIFE and TIME, Through
Student Periodical Agency, Don An-
derson (Grad) manager. 705 1st
Nat'l Bldg. Phone 2-82-42. )3
BEAUTIFUL new log cabin, modern,
located in Glenbrook subdivision,
Half Moon Lake, partly furnished.
Phone owner, 8320. )98
SPECIAL-Men's Compo Soles and Rub-
ber Heels, $1.98. De Marco Shoe Re-
pair, 322 E. Liberty. )54
HALLICRAFTER 5x28 radio - covers
550KC to 43MC. 12 inch speaker in
matching bass-reflex cabinet. $125.
Call E. A. Worsham after 5:30 p.m.
at 9559. )53
PARAKEETS-Babies and mated pairs.
Exhibition quality birds from prize
winning stock. Both male and female
parakeets can be trained to talk. 562
S. Seventh, near W. Madison. )2B

FOR SALE
1947 FORD Station Wagon-Good con-
dition. Ask for Don Winslow, 2-6373.
)55
PRESTO K-8 RECORDER - National
high powered receiver. Both almost
new. Cheap. Call Teachout Record-
ing Studio, 5118. )46
SAVE MONEY
Gabardine Pants--$4.95; Michigan
Sweat-Shirts-$1.95. Navy "T" Shirts
45c; All Wool Sweat Socks-49c
U.S. Navy-Army Type Oxfords-$6.88
Open until 6:30 p.m.
SAM'S STORE, 122 E. Washington )6
1934 PONTIAC with new battery, brakes
and two tires. Contact Doshi. Ph.
5088. )501
WANTED TO BUY
SET OF USED first year German records
in good condition at reasonable price
Alfred Freeland Fletcher Hall. 3-1511
) 21W
FOUR TICKETS to Purdue game to-
gether. Call 3-1935 afternoons. )20W
ROOMS FOR RENT
VACANCY DUE TO ILLNESS-Half of
double. Three blocks from campus
412 South Fifth Avenue. Phone 2-8365
Student landlord. $6. ) 29R
BRING YOUR' weekend guests to the
Pierce Transient Home except for the
Ohio State and Purdue games. 1133
E. Ann. Phone 8144. )16
NICE, CLEAN ROOM-$5.00. 1206
Wright. Phone 5979. )28R
TRANSPORTATION

BUSINESS SERVICES
UNSIGHTLY HAIR removed perma-
nently. Short wave method ap-
proved by Am. Med. Ass'n., 5 Nickels
Arcade. Ph. 2-6696. )12B
LEARN TO DANCE _
Jimmy Hunt Dance Studio
209 S. State Street
Phone 8161 )1P
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
Van Doren Clarinet Reeds
Box of 25-$4.50
. New and Used Instruments
209 E. Washington __ )4B
HAVE YOUR TYPEWRITER REPAIRED
b the Office Equipment Service Co.,
215 E. Liberty. )16B
SHIRTS - Nine hour service (by re-
quest), three day service (regular ser-
vice). Ace Laundry, 1116 S. University.
) 21B
HHILDEGARDE SHOPPE
109 E. Washington
Expert Alterations
Custom Clothes
Established Tradition )3B
EFFICIENT, EXPERT-prompt Type-
writer Repair Service. Mosely's Type-
writer and Supply Company. 214 E.
Washington. Phone 5888. d )5B
WASHING and/or ironing done in
my gwz home. Free pick-up and de-
livery. Phone 2-9020. )1B
GREETING CARDS inscribed in colors.
10c each or $1.00 per box. J. A. Early,
402 Observatory. Phone 2-8606. )8B
TYPING
Pickup Vand Delivery Service, 2-1282
) 22B
PHOTO-ENGRAVING
24-hou service at Reasonable Charges
'High Quality Engraving
Michigan Daily, 420Maynard
Phone 2-3241

HELP WANTED
AGENT WANIED
EARN LIBERAL COMMISSION in school
selling kits of betiful matched fab-
ric and yarn, imnported and hand-
loomed, for sweater-skirt sets. For
details write to Loom-Sets. Box :.51,
G.P.O., New York 1, New Y ork. )10H
SIGN PAINTER
A male st udient to do sign painting.
Earl ESports Building. )12H
CAN YOU SELL? -If you can't you
ought to learn how! And if you can,
you can earn big money selling TIME
ancd LIFE at the reduced student
rates. Phone 2-82-42 for more infor-
iat)n
LOST ANDFOUND
BILLFOLDI Return will the identifi-
cation, buL keep the money-G. K.
B~urnet. 2-1182.
LOST-Works and back of Hamilton
man's watch near Madison and Pack-
ard about two weeks ago. Reward,
Il0<< of value. Call Wayne. 2-1642.
)69L
LOST-Mechanism of Whitnaur watch.
Between campus and stadium. Re-
ward. Call 2-5344. )67L
LOST-Black Shaeffer Pen in lobby of
New Women's Dorm Saturday morn-
ing. Reward. Call Paula Harrington.
2-6581. )64L
WANTED TO RENT
1 BASS HORN-in any condition-Call
4183._ )5N
PERSONAL
CORSAGES-Buy quality flowers at a
savings. Compare our prices with
any in Ann Arbor. Formal Flower
SERVICE. Tel. 2-3169. Ask for Ed
or Herb. )25P
WANTED-Ten to fifteen morede
Enjoy your meals in pleasant sur-
roundings. Take advantage of the
Student Budget. For more informa-
tion phone STAGE COACH INN, 6004.
)2P
WATCH FOR the special reduced "Stu-
dent-Christmas-Gift" rates on LIFE
and TIME. Ideal gifts for family and
student friends. Student Periodical
_Agency. )3______
PHOTOGRAPHER WANTED--for Pan
Hel Ball, Nov. 11. Submit bids to
Betty Bridges. Ph. 5032. )24P

? I

DRIVING Los Angeles Sun. -'49
Take 2. Call Si Maxwell 2-6422.

Ford.
)1l0T

IQ tests are not foolproof, ac-
cording to Prof. Louis Granich of
the psychology department.
"Psychologists have long been
aware of the defects in intelli-
gence tests resulting from the
different socio-economic back-
grounds of the persons taking
them," he said.
COMMENTING on an article by
Prof. Ernest A. Haggard of the
University of Chicago's psycholo-
gy department, which termed IQ
tests biased against lower-class
children, Prof. Granich said there
is nothing magical about these
tests.
"They are measures of child-
ren's learning potentialities,
only to the extent that the en-
vironment of the children has
been equal," he added.
Non-verbal performance tests,
which test the child's ability to
deal with concrete materials, are
usually fairer to children who
have environmental handicaps,
Prof. Granich said.
* * *
HE POINTED OUT that the
problem of testing children of
backward areas, such as country
regions in the South, is extremely
difficult.
"Children from areas where
little or no education or stimu-
lating home life is received can-
not be expected to do as well as

PARENT EDUCATION:
Security, Health of Children
Seen Vital for World Peace

those who have had a good
schooling," he said.
However, Prof. Granich added
that such backward areas are not
typical and that the existing ones
have been on the decline since
the war.
He noted that children from the
rural South who come North often
show a striking increase in IQ
after a few years in urban areas.
[DormitoryNews]
EDITOR'S NOTE: Contributors to
What's Up in the Dorms should con-
tact Martha Bazar at The Daily or
4007 Hinsdale House.
With only thirty more days un-
til the Holly Hop, preparations for
the annual West Quad dance are
well under way.
* * *
GEORGE BOUCHER has been
appointed general chairman. Oth-
er committee heads are Ned Bel-
cher, finance; Don White, decora-
tions; Joe Simpson, music; Tom
Massnick, tickets; Bill Welke, pa-
trons and Gene Lamb, publicity,
Women of the New Residence
Hall are also at work on their
Christmas. formal. They have
decided on the date and the
theme. They also have the
money and the committees, but
as yet no name.
A contest is currently being held,
in hoesthat the lure of a free
ticket will produce some original
titles.
* * *
THE NEW officers of Burk
Aaron Hinsdale House are Bill
Hoffmeyer, president; Ted Col-
liau, vice president; Reggie Huff,
secretary; Dick Brainard, treas-
urer; Bud Strout, publicity chair-
man; Blair Milliken, social chair-
man; Dick Doyle, sports chairman
and Phil Paykin, Quad represen-
tative.
Perhaps the course of true love
will run a little smoother, now
that ten direct lines have been in-
stalled connecting the East Quad
with the women's dorms.
Tiny Hats Vogue
The wlole nood of the Paris
fall demands and receives tiny
hats. They are of all shapes, from
a -head-hugging helmet to a tiny
pillbox perched atop. Short-
cropped hair very carefully
groomed is still the vogue.
DO YOU KNOW ... that against
Northwestern in 1943 Michigan's
Bill Daley set a modern confer-
ence rushing record with a total
of 216 yards gained in 26 rushes.
OPEN DAILY 1:15 P.M.
FM ._ ..U

I

(CLEVELAN D OCHCESTRA
GEORGE SZELL, Conductor
Sunday, NOV. 61 7 P.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM
Tickets $3.00 - $2.40 - $1.80
University Musical Society, Burton Tower

iis- - - -

-- - -,

ART CINEMA LEAGUE and YP
present

ENDING TODAY

-9

)dohn .teiit eck
"GRPESOF WRATH"
eHenry Fonda in a cinemamatic
study of an unusual era"
ARCHITECTURAL AUDITORIUM
Fri., Sat. at 7:00 and 9:00 P.M.
Advance Sale: League Lobby
Thi., Fri. 2-6

All of France
Called Her
an Insult to
Womanhood!
Produced in Hollywood <.
30e
et
"%
v
w~v ;n
C1

I

The University of Michigan Oratorical Association

Today's

Presents

* "No lasting peace is possible un-
less the world's children become
secure and healthy," Mary E.
Sweeny, lecturer at the recent
Parent Education Institute, said
in an interview with The Daily.
"Children are the focal point
where all nations can meet," she
declared. **-
MISS SWEENY was formerly a
consultant for United Services to
China, and has visited India.
Her plan for helping the
children of the world includes
contributions of food and send-
Ing teachers abroad to spread
our "know how."
Parents should be taught the
importance of health education
for their children, she said.
MANY OF the uneducated
Chinese, Indians and other peo-
ples fear such health precautions
as vaccination and innoculation,"
she explained.
Miss Sweeny said that visual
education is the finest method
for teaching the children of
other nations. "Children crave
color and life."
Give them a colored food chart
and they will study it for the
sheer enjoyment of looking at its
beautiful color and brightness,
she added.
* * *
"OUR SERVTKCE in the world
must be dedicated to helping
ORPHEUM
Cinema Triumphs
From All Nations

others to help themselves. We
must help for the sake of kind-
ness and friendship," she said.
American children can never be
safe unless the children of the
rest of the world are saved, ac-
cording to Miss Sweeny.
* * *
Calls for More
Home Religion
"Evidences of emotional malnu-
trition in our society makes us
question the quality of the home's
achievement in the social and
spiritual realm," according to Mrs.
C. C. Clark, regional vice-president
of the Congress of Parents and
Teachers.
Mrs. Clark spoke at the final
session of the Parent-Education
Institute.
"HOME and church must work
together as an educational agency
and church programs should be
planned on a family basis," she
said.
"Other programs pull the
family apart; the church must
work to stabilize the home,"
she added.
The only approach to peace
and security is a reliance on our
religious concepts, Mrs. Clark de-
clared.

Pro grams
MUSIC-6:30 p.m. WWJ-NBC
Symphony, Arturo Toscanini
conducting Beethoven's Sym-
phony No. 2, Elgar's "Enig-
ma".
10 p.m. WXYZ-TV-"Down
in the Valley," modern one
act opera.
DRAMA-12:30 p.m. WJR-
Grand Central Station: "The
Shy One" wtih William Red-
field, Josephine Hull.
a,4

ADOLPHE MENJOU
Speaking on
"STAIRWAY TO STARDOM"

35c
until 5 P.M.

I

I

-SUNDAY
Humphrey Bogart
in "TOKYO JOE"
Continuous from 1 P.M.

Monday, Nov. 8

8:30 P.M.

HILL AUDITORIUM

I

w

IG
1.0"!-T-HEA-TRE'+___

Box Office open Monday, 10 A.M. to 8:30 P.M.
Prices Main Floor $1.50; First Balcony $1.20;
Second Balcony 90c

ONE DAY ONLY
Matinee and Night

V

5in~ person'

TODAY ONLY!
at 3:25 - 6:30 4 :40 P.M.

....

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Sir TI

The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
ON THE SCREEN!
SADLER'S WELLS STARS
Moira Shearer & Robert Helpmann
Dance in the Motion Picture
onF
ry .::.. "C ,

homas Beecham Conducts

#'
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- Starts Sunday -

Ai

TODAY
AND SUNDAY
Continuous from 1 :30

'Magazine Says;

at 1:30 - 5:15 & 8:25 P.M.

: :

Y, :..
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