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November 04, 1949 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-11-04

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THE IVIICH16-AN I}.r ity

TRTT)AT, NOVEMBER 4, 1949

_________________________________________________________________ U

THANKS FOR THE MEMORY:
Record Album To Preserve Big U' Event

Prancers' Prelimirnary

By JOAN WILLENS
Fifty years from now University
students will be able to relive the
excitement of the Wolverine foot-
ball games, the spirited optimism
of the pep rallies, the incompar-
able songs of Danny Kaye, and
many other memorable events of
the 1949-50 school year.
The Wolverine Club is sponsor-
ing the manufacture of a school
record album, on the order of the
"I Can Hear It Now" album which
has preserved famous historical
moments of world events from the
past decade.
* * *
THE SALES campaign for re-
ceiving orders for the album will
start next week in dormitories And
houses all over campus, Al Hartz-

mark of the Wolverine Club an-
nounced.
A contest will be held to de-
cide a "catchy" name for the
album, he said.
The success of a similar album
at Northwestern University last
year stimulated interest in making
one available at Michigan this
year. Four other Big Nine schools
have also made plans to make al-
bums.
AGENTS TAKING orders for
the Michigan album will play rec-
ords from the Northwestern album
to give students an idea of what
the new album will include.
The final album will contain
three 12 inch vinolyte records.

The first record will appear in
January, and the others will be
made by June, to insure the in-
clusion of important events up
to the end of the semester,
Hartzmark said.
Spanish Poet-Critic
To L~ctlure Today
Pedro Salinas, Spanish poet and
literary critic, will speak on "Three
Metaphores in Three Times" at
8:00 p.m. today in the Rackham
amphitheatre.
The lecture is sponsored by the
Romance Languages Department
and the Societdad Hispanica.

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"Come with me to

STORYLAND and TOYLAND
.t FOLLETT'S
The OPENING of our new
Large, Colorful, and Modern
CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT
ON OUR SECOND FLOOR
BOOKS, GAMES, TOYS
RECORDS and GIFTS

Snell Leads
Hill Concert
This Sunday
r
The Cleveland Orchestra will
play the fourth concert in the
Choral Union's regular series at
7 p.m. Sunday in Hill Auditorium,
under the baton of Conductor
George Szell.
Szell, leading a group recognized
by music critics as one of the fin-
est in the country, has conducted
the Orchestra for the past three
years. Preceding Szell as conduc-
tors of the symphony were Erich
Leinsdorf, who took over the po-
dium in 1943, and Artur Rodzinski,
conductor of the group for ten
years.
FIRST CONDUCTOR of the
group was Nikolai Sokoloff, who
lead the Orchestra for its first fif-
teen years, including its first con-
cert on December 11, 1918.
The Orchestra was founded at
that time by the Musical Arts
Association of Cleveland, and
gave two concerts that year. In
the succeeding 31 years, the Or-
chestra's programs and prestige
has increased proportionately,
with the group now playing 44
regular concerts in Cleveland
alone.
A noted part of the Cleveland's
program of music in its home city
is the series of 30 concerts given
especially for children every year
by the Orchestra under the lead-
ership of its associate conductor,
Rudolph Ringwall.
GRADED IN listenability for
different ages, the music is played
for high school, and upper and
lower grade school groups, and all
are prepared for the concerts by
an intensive study of the music
they will hear.
Tickets for the concert may be
purchased at the office of the
Choral Union, at Burton Tower.
Movies at Kellogg
"Nomads of the Jungle," a film
about Malaya, and "Tropical
Mountain Island," a movie on
Java, will be shown at 4:10 p.m.
today at Kellogg Auditorium by
the Audio-Visual Education Cen-
ter.
STUDENTS NOTICE
1/2 Lb, tin of
BRIGGS
PIPE TOBACCO
(reg. 75c value)
PLUS A
STANHOPE PIPE
(reg. $3,50 value)
Both for $1.95
AT MICHIGAN UNION
CIGAR COUNTER
TODAY

A new drug - depot heparin -
may result in wider use of drugs
for treating blood clots that may
damage the lungs or heart, Dr.
Ivan F. Duff of the University
Hospital told the Seventh Annual ;
Meeting of the Midwestern Section
of the American Federation for
Clinical Research in Chicago re-
cently.
The new drug has been found ,
to prolong the time it takes for
blood to clot, Dr. Duff said.
Faculty Men Air
Views of Far East
"Our Position in Asia" will be
discussed by three University fac-
ulty members on the World Forum
program on WWJ at 7:30 p.m. to-
morrow.
Participating in the broadcast
will be Prof. Russell H. Fifield and
Robert E. Ward of the political
science department, and Prof.
Frank L. Huntley of the English
department.

READING A PAPER on the de-
pot heparin research he conduct-
ed with Dr. James W. Linman,
veteran resident at the University
Hospital and Thomas K. Buchan-
an, junior medical student, Dr.
Duff said the drug can be used
with less elaborate laboratory fa-
cilities than were necessary in con-
trolling administration of previ-
ously used drugs.
The drug is used for several
days or weeks, on patients
known to have a blood clot, to
prevent the clot from increasing
in size and the consequent dang-
er of its traveling to the lungs
or heart, which might be fatal
to the patient.
One injection of depot heparin
will prolong the normal= clotting
time of blood, which is 11 minutes,
to 24 hours, Dr. Duff said.
PREVIOUSLY THREE or four
daily injections, or, even a con-
tinuous intravenous injection was
needed, he added.

DEPOT HEPARIN:
Research on New Drug
Reported by U' Doctor

-Daily-Wally Barth
PENZANCE PRANCERS-These two fugitives from the Cornwall
coast were found rehearsing the "Penzance Prance" for the forth-
coming Gilbert and Sullivan Society production of "Pirates of
Penzance." The dance is said to have originated in Queen Vic-
toria's day. This classic example of choreography was revived
this year by Jimmie Lobaugh, '50SM. Audiences will be able to
see the above artists in action for the first time Nov. 30 in Pat-
tengill Auditorium.
** *' *.
Lovers of Dance Smitten
W ith 'Penzance Prance'

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By PAUL BRENTLINGER
Last year it was the "Daphne-
phoric bound."
But this year the "Penzance
Prance" has left local lovers of the

II

dance swooning with delight.
Both of these classic choreo-
graphic creations have been reviv-
ed in Ann Arbor by University
Gilbert and Sullivan Society chor-
eographer Jimmie Lobaugh, '50-
SM.

EVERYTHING FOR THE TAT TO THE TEEN-AGER.

> 4,

SPECIAL DEPARTMENT made up of
PLAYSKOOL and HOLGATE
EDUCATIONAL TOYS
This department will be open the year around.
Be sure to COME UP AND BROWSE in
"Storyland and Toytown" for Christmas Shopping.
FOLL IET

A HANGOVER from theatrical
productions of ancient Greece, the
Daphnephoric bound was unearth-
Today's
Programs
Comedy .
8 p.m. WWJ-Henry Morgan.
8:30 p.m. WJR-My Favorite
Husband, with Lucille Ball.
9:30 p.m. WWJ-Jimmy Dur-
ante.
Forum ...
10 p.m. CBS-TV -People's
Platform: "Who Should Pay for
Pensions." Stewart Moacham,
Henry Hazlet.
Drama ...
8 p.m. WUOM-"NBC The-
ater." "The Romantic Comedi-
ans," by Ellen Glasgow.

ed last spring for the production
of "Patience."
In this show, the chorus of ;
twenty rapturous maidens exe-
cuted the "Bound" as a symbol
of all that is lovely and aesthetic
in the nature of man, and
woman.
"Pirates of Penzance," slated for
production this fall required a dif-
ferent sort of dance, however.
LOBAIJGH searched many mus-
ty manuscripts of the last century
to learn how comely little lasses
of Queen Victoria's day danced as
they went to wade in the waves
of the sea.
Fruit of the research was the
"Penzance Prance," which will
be seen publicly for the first
time this century when "Pir-
ates" is premiered on November
30 at Pattengill Auditorium.
Succeeding performances will be
given on Dec. 1 and 2, and a final
performance will be presented in
Detroit's Rackham Building Audi-
torium on December 3.
Mail orders for all three Ann
Arbor performances are being ac-
cepted now. They should be ad-
dressed to the University Gilbert
and Sullivan Society, care of Dean
Rea, 1020 Administration Bldg.,
according to Fred Scheffler, '50,
society president.
Talk on. Goethe
Prof. Friedrich Bruns, of the
University of Wisconsin, will
speak on "Goethe, Man and Poet"
at 4:15 today at the Rackham
Amphitheatre.
Sponsored by the German de-
partment, the lecture is the last
in a series commemorating the
200th anniversary of the birth of
Goethe.

Twice as Pretty...
S Cyy )
Twice Buttoned
A new blouse fashioned by BOBBIE BROOKS in fine Sanforized broadcloth,
The Peter Pan collar is matched with the flapped pocket... and the
double row of pearly buttons are dyed to match the rainbow colors in
this selection. Sizes 9 to 15.
RAMD LLFS
9:00-5:30 306 S. State St.

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State Street at North University

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