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November 03, 1949 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-11-03

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAIlY

PAGE

.. ;. s _ a.aa vaa: vsar. , , .c.aa ua

StenS e Steals First in AP Poll

PETERSON DUO CLICKS:
Brother Aet Sparks Wolverine Offense

Purdue Next Hurdle for Wolverines

New York Pilot Acclaimed
1949's 'Manager of Year'

C4 --

Every week a new assortment of
"ifs" about the Western Confer-
ence football derby finds its way
onto the sports pages.
The current situation has many
different complexions, depending
upon which campus you look at it
from. With early season difficul-
ties apparently ironed out, Michi-
gan has a fine shot at its third
straight title - if someone halts
the high-flying Iowa Hawkeyes.
THAT TAKES care of one "if."
But, the Wolverines must ex-
ert some effort also. They must
topple the other leader, Ohio
State, at season's end. On the
other hand, that game might
be just an ordinary one unless
they attend to two fundamental
"ifs," Purdue and Indiana.
The first of these is only two
days away, and Boilermaker coach
Stu Holcomb will bring his squad
* "KEEP A-HEAD
OF YOUR HAIR"
Try us for workmanship,
service, sanitation.
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty near State

here fresh from its shocking con-
quest of the Tarnished Gophers
of Minnesota. There is no room
for a Michigan letdown now, a
fact which is being reflected by
Bennie Oosterbaan during this
week's practice sessions.
YESTERDAY the Wolverines.
were served a big portion of de-
fensive drill apparently aimed at
perfecting the already formidable
Michigan armor. Oosterbaan stres-
sed tactics designed to stop the
passing of Purdue quarterback,
Ken Gorgal, and the varied run-
ning game which features the un-
predictable Harry Szulborski and
John Kerestes.
The defensive platoon func-
tioned without the services of
Lloyd Heneveld yesterday but
the dependable guard is expected
to shake the effects of his in-
jury in time to start Saturday.
Otherwise the team is in good
physical condition, excepting Leo
Koceski.
However, there was even some
optimism about Koceski yester-
day. Hopes that the sidelined half-
back might soon return to the line-

up were aroused when he ran
through plays during an offensive
dummy scrimmage. It's not like-
ly that Oosterbaan will use him
against the Boilermakers but he
may be ready for Indiana a week
hence.
PSYCHOLOGICALLY at least,
the Wolverines are in a much bet-
ter position after the Purdue-Min-
nesota upset last week. If the
Boilermakers had continued their
role of Big Ten doormat, Michi-
gan might well have underesti-
mated the coming contest. As
things stand Oosterbaan has some
excellent propaganda available for
keying his charges mentally.
Purdue also has good reason
for pointing up for this game.
The Lafayette campus hasn't
forgotten the 40-0 lacing Mich-
igan served up as a homecom-
ing package for the Boilermak-
ers last season. Then too, the
1949 edition can salvage a dis-
asterous season by spilling the
Wolverines.
Michigan backers are hopefully
looking for some outside help this
weekend. They want Minnesota
to bounce off the canvas just long
enough to lash Iowa at Minnea-
polis.
IF THE HAWKEYES slip past
the Gophers, only Wisconsin can
prevent them from at least shar-
ing the Conference crown.
From indications, then, it looks
as though some of the confusion
surrounding the Big Ten will be
cleared away after Saturday's ac-
tion.
No one is counting on it, how-
ever. Things might just become
even more complicated, and next
week there may be a new host of
"ifs" to talk about.
HOCKEY SCORES
Detroit 5, Boston 3
New York 3, Toronto 3 (tie)
Chicago 4, Montreal 1

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-Charles Dillon
(Casey) Stengel, the frustrated
dentist, yesterday was voted base-
ball's "Manager of the Year" in a
poll conducted by The Associated
Press.
The leathery, wrinkled 59-year-
old veteran, who climaxed a 30-
year career in baseball by lead-
ing the New York Yankees to a
world championship, won in a pro-
verbial breeze.
* * *
NO OTHER MANAGER even
came close. Casey was named on
101 of the 116 ballots cast by mem-
bers of the Major League Baseball
Writers' Association of America.
Only four other pilots received
any sort of backing. Freshman
pilot Robert (Red) Rolfe of De-
troit and youthful Eddie Sawyer
of the Philadelphia Phillies tied
for runner-up honors with six
votes apiece.
Joe McCarthy, whose Boston
Red Sox missed winning the
American League flag on the final
day, received two votes. Jack On-
slow, who brought the Chicago
White Sox up two notches from
eighth to sixth, corralled the final
vote.
STENGEL EARNED top rank-
ing because of the near-miracle
he achieved in leading a team to a
pennant in the face of an ever-
mounting list of injuries and ill-
nesses that at times threatened to
tear the team apart.
Although he never was sure of
being able to send out the same
batting order two days in suc-
cession, Casey quietly and effi-
ciently maneuvered his players
around wtih such skill that they
led the field all but one week of
the season. a
Finally overtaken by Boston in
the last week, Stengel's forces
stormed back to whip the Red
Sox in the two closing games of
the hectic campaign and win the

flag by one game. This was the
same team that was picked by the
experts to be lucky to finish in the
first division.
* * *
IT WAS A GRATEFUL and ap-
preciative Casey Stengel who
heard the news at Glendale, Calif.

By JIM PARKER
Last Saturday at Champaign,1
Illinois, Michigan turned back an
inspired Illini football teams in
registering a hard-fought 13-0
victory over the Orange and Blue,
but to two members of the Wol-
verine squad, brothers Tom and
Don Peterson, there was an added
meaning to this game.
For it was in the second half of
the Illinois battle that Tom and
Don got their first real chanceto
work together on a football offen-
sive unit.
AND WHILE the sports an-
nouncers were going crazy trying
to keep track of which Peterson
was doing what, the brothers from
Racine, Wis., were busy making
life miserable for the Illini rooters
who had come to celebrate Bob
Zuppke Day.
Until Chuck Lentz returned a
Raklovits punt from the Illinois
40 yard-line in the fourth quar-
ter, the Petersons had personally
accounted for 52 of the 53 yards
and all four of the first downs
gained rushing by the Michigan
offense to that point in the sec-
ond half.
But despite this performance,
the Wolverines were still nursing
a one touchdown lead that didn't
seem any too large at that point of
the game.
THEN LENTZ'S PUNT return
to the Illinois 25 yard-line set the
stage for the Peterson-sparked
touchdown that provided the final
13 point margin of victory.
Don Peterson started the drive
when he crossed up the Orange
and Blue defenders by tossing a
pass to his brother Tom, good
for a first down on the 14 yard-
line. Then right halfback Don
took the hand-off from fullback
Tom on a reverse and drove to
the eight.
Two plays had failed to gain
when Tom again spun to give the
ball to his brother on a fourth
down reverse. Don carried to the
two for the firs't down and Michi-
gan rooters breathed a little easier.
In two plays Tom had scored and
the Wolverine fans went wild.
BUT PROBABLY none of the
cheering spectators realized the
thrill experienced by the Peterson
brothers. To them that touchdown
provided a fitting climax to their
first full day's work together on a
football gridiron.
Despite the mere two years
difference in their ages Tom

and Don had never played in the
same backfield together until
this season at Michigan. And it
wasn't until this Illinois game
that they worked side by side for
any appreciable time as an of-
fensive combination in the
Michigan system.
It all began back at Racine's St.
Catherine High School. In 1945
Tom had just finished a success-
ful year on St. Catherine's unde-
feated eleven before Don began to
come into his own on the squad.
THE NEXT YEAR found Tom
enrolled in the pre-medical course
at Michigan where he earned his
first football letter as a freshman
on the 1944 Wolverine team. After
his first year at Ann Arbor Tom
joined the Army and was sent to
Japan with Gen. MacArthur's
Army of Occupation in 1945.
Back in Racine Don had
moved up in the St. Catherine
football picture and in the Fall
of 1945 the younger Peterson
climaxed his senior year by
earning a halfback berth on
Wisconsin's All-State team. Up-
on graduation Don followed the
footsteps of his brother and also
joined the Army.
Even in the Army Tom and Don
Peterson played on the same serv-
ice football team-General Head-
quarters in Japan - but each
played in different years-Tom in
1946 and Don in 1947.
WHEN THE 1947 football s:-
son rolled around, the elder Peter-
son was back at Michigan under-
studying fullback Jack Weisen-
burger of the Rose Bowl champi-
onship team.

The next year Don got out of
the Army and proceeded to Ann
Arbor to enroll in the pre-medi-
cal curriculum.
And while Don was working out
with Wally Weber's freshman
team big brother Tom was kept
busy as the leading scorer (with 55
points) of Michigan's 1948 na-
tional championship squad.
Then finally came this year's Il-
linois game and the Petersons'
touchdown and their personal gain
of 91 yards on offense.

I

II

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CASEY STENGEL
... top voice from the bench
* * *
"Well, well, that's really some-
thing," he said. "But remember
it takes the ballplayers to push
you up to where you get to bej
'Manager of the Year.' I couldn't
have done it with football play-
ers, you know."
Bill Veeck, owner of the Cleve-
land Indians, probably paid Sten-
gel the greatest compliment of all
when he said:
"IF THE YANKEE players lis-
tened to Casey, I can assure you
they have learned more baseball
than they ever absorbed from any
other pilot-yes, as much as the
veterans ever got from Joe Mc-
Carthy."

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AP Sports Headlines

ALTERATIONS AT COST
IEflZ TOGGERY

EAST LANSING - Michigan
State, preparing for a football
meeting with mighty Notre Dame
Saturday, is the cockiest, most
confident underdogcyou ever did
see.
Michigan State has been scout-
ing Notre Dame ever since the 26-7
defeat that marked the renewal of
relations between the two teams

last year. The Spartans have been
pointing for this one since the
Michigan game.
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