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November 02, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-11-02

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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tigers'

Kell

Paces

AP

All-Star

Vote

* * *

Nation's Writers Name
Six American Leaguers
Boston Red Sox Place Parnell, Williams,
Kinder to Lead Teams; J. Robinson Chosen

Michigan Climbs to 5th in Grid Poll;
Notre Dame, Cadets Again Rank 1-21

Football News Cites ]lomsen
Tony Momsen, Michigan center, was named by the Football News
yesterday at the center position on its Line-of-the-Week.
Momsen, a 205-pound junior from Toledo, Ohio, was cited for hit
outstanding performance in Michigan's 13-0 conquest of Illinois at
Champaign last Saturday. Time and again Momsen made decisive
tackles while backing up the line.
The Football News also gave honorable mention to Wolverine end
Harry Allis for his excellent play in the same game.
Allis caught one of Chuck Ortmann's passes for what proved to
be the winning touchdown.

NEW YORK-Six players from
the American loop and four from
the National circuit make up the
1949,Major League All-Star team
selected for the Associated Press
by 116 members of the Baseball
Writers Association of America.
Only six of the 16 big league
clubs, three in each circuit, are
represented in the fourth annual
All-Star squad. The World Cham-
pion New York Yankees won two
berths as did the National League
Champion Brooklyn Dodgers..
HOWEVER, BOTH had to yield
to Boston's second place Red Sox,
who topped all clubs with three
representatives-Ted Williams in
Ohe outfield and southpaw Mel
Parnell and righthander Ellis
Kinder in the pitching depart-
ment. One man from Detroit, one
from Pittsburgh and one from the
St. Louis Cardinals complete the
team.
Only two of the 10 men select-
ed are holdovers from the 1948
All-Star team. They are Stan
Musial, slugging Cardinal out-
fielder, and Williams. The lat-
ter is the only performer to be
elected to all four teams since
the poll was inaugurated in 1946.
No player was seleced unani-
mously. George Kell, Detroit third
baseman, who nosed out Williams
for the unofficial American League
batting title by a fraction of a
percentage point, was named on
all but three ballots to win the
third base post hands down. Wil-
liams missed out on four of the
116 ballots cast.
MSC at Full
ntrength for
t Notre Da me
EAST LANSING-(A)For the
first time this year, Michigan
State should be up to full strength
for the Notre Dame football game.
With the exception of Captain
Hal Vogler, sidelined from foot-
ball permanently by a neck injury,
all the cripples will be ready for at
least limited service next Satur-
day against the Irish.
* * *
COACH BIGGIE MUNN has
been keeping all his players on the
doubtful list out of the fray for the
last few games, nursing them
along in hopes they would be
ready for this big one. The strategy
appears to have worked.
And in addition, there were no
injuries from the 62-14 past-
ing of Temple last weekend.
Quarterback Gene Glick (in-
jured knee) has been coming along
nicely and should be available for
at least spot passing duty against
Notre Dame. Sophomore quarter-
back Bob Ciolek (injured knee.
was well enough to do relief work
against Temple.

JOINING KELL in the infield
are the Yankees' Tommy Henrich
at first base and Phil Rizzuto at
shortstop, and Brooklyn's Jackie
Robinson at second base. Robin-
son won with 108 votes, Henrich
drew 97 and Rizzuto 83. Henrich
also received five outfield votes.
The smallest number of votes
by a winner was garnered by
Pittsburgh's Ralph Kiner. The
majors' home run king received
68 votes to beat out the Cards'
Enos Slaughter, the Yankees'
Joe Dimaggio and six other
competitors for the third out-
field position.
Musial had an even 100 votes to
join Kell, Williams and Robinson
as the only athletes to poll 100 or
All SMars All
First base-Tommy Henrich,
Yankees.
Second Base - Jackie Robin-
son, Dodgers.
Third Base - George Kell,
Tigers.
Shortstop - Phil R i z z u t o,
Yankees.
Left Field - T e d Williams,
Red Sox.
Center Field - Stan Musial,
Cardinals.
Right Field - Ralph Kiner,
Pirates.
Catcher - R o y Campanella,
Dodgers.
Righthanded Pitcher - Ellis
Kinder, Red Sox.
Lefthanded P i t c h e r-Mel
Parnell, Red Sox.
more votes. The Cardinal ace also
won three first base calls.
Roy Campanella of the Dodgers,
who won the catching berth easily,
was only one shy of the century
figure.

NEW YORK - (R) - Two new
teams. Southern Methodist and
Michigan State, elbowed their way
into college football's "First Ten"
BOSTON- (A') -Joe McCar-
thy, who has failed, only once
in three decades to bring his
ball club home in the first divi-
sion, yesterday agreed to man-
age Boston's Red Sox for two
more seasons.
yesterday and one of them, Michi-
gan State, took an immediate lead
on the No. 1 spot held by Notre
IMMRE M se rDame...
GEORGE KELL The fighting Irish, who are
. . . leads again making a near runaway of the
LLOYD HAS 'EM IN DUTCH'

race for national honors, move
over to East Lansing, Mich., Sat-
urday for a game with the Spar-
tans, now tenth in the rankings.
* * *
THE SPARTANS have been
hovering around the fringe of the
select bracket chosen in the week-
ly Associated Press poll but didn't
squeeze in until they walloped
Temple, 62-14, for their fifth vic-
tory in six starts. Their only set-
back was an opening 7-3 loss to
Michigan.
Southern Methodist is an old
familiar tenant which just
moved out after bowing to Rice,
41-27. Subsequent victories
over Kentucky and Texas re-
stores the Mustangs to national

Heneveld Leads Defensive Comeback

favor again and they jumped in
and took over the No. 9 spot.
Evicted as a result of these ma-
neuverings were Minnesota, which
plummeted from seventh to no-
where after bowing to Purdue 13-7,
and Pennsylvania, a 22-21 last
minute loser to Pitt. Penn fell
from ninth to a tie with Fordham
for 20th.
THE OTHER EIGHT in the top
ten held their leases although
there was some shuffling of posi-
tions below the first four, which
remained intact.
Notre Dame, Army, Oklahoma
and California, all amassing
more than 1,000 points in the
Associated Press nationwide poll
of sports writers and broadcas-
ters, continued to set the pace in
just the order named.
Then followed Michigan, Baylor,
Cornell, Rice, SMU and Michigan
State, just like that.
Notre Dame drew 133 of the 161
first place votes cast for a total
of 1,569 points. The points are
awarded on the basis of ten for a
first place vote, nine for second,'
etc.
THE TOTAL VOTE with points
figures on a 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1
basis (first place votes in paren-
theses).
1. Notre Dame (133) 1,569
2. Army (10) 1,323
3. Oklahoma (11) 1,308
4. California (4 1,070
5. MICHIGAN 625
6. Baylor 591
7. Cornell (1) 484
8. Rice 447
9. Southern Methodist 269
10. Michigan State (2) 249
The second ten-11. Ohio State,
218; 12. Southern California, 110;
13. Kentucky, 75; 14. Tennessee,
57; 15. Iowa, 54; 16. Duke, 48; 17.
Louisiana State, 38; 18. Boston
University, 36; 19. Virginia,s34;
20. Pennsylvania and Fordham,
each 28. 5

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C+ I

By TED PAPES
From all indications it appears
that Michigan has regained its
reputation for impregnable foot-
ball defense, much the same as
enjoyed by the championship
squads of 1947 and 1948.
It is generally accepted that
Lloyd "Dutch" Heneveld has been
one of the major factors in the re-
surgence of Bennie Oosterbaan's
"brick wall" platoon. Yet Hene-
veld is probably one of the most
underrated of the current Wolver-
ines, in the eyes of the fans any-
way.
wa .* * * ,
FIRST OF ALL, he's a coach's
player. Line boss Jack Blott is
really high on Dutch, even to the
point of calling him one of the
greatest guards he's seen here.
Blott says, "He's swift and con-
sistent, never letting up under any
conditions. His specialty is nailing
the ball carrier on a kickoff, and
he makes it a point to race Kemp-

thorn for
day."

that honor every Satur-

And Lloyd is a player's player
too. Michigan team members, to
a man, have only the highest re-
gard for him both as a football
competitor and as an individual.
They'll all comment that they
are proud to play alongside or
behind him.
Heneveld came up via Holland
where he played end for three
years in high school. In the spring
of 1946 he realized his ambition
of coming to Michigan, breaking
in as a flank man under Fritz
Crisler. SincekCrisler was long on
ends at the time, he asked Lloyd
if he would like a crack at the
guard slot.
* * *
THE SOFT-SPOKEN lad moved
into that position in the fall and
is still going strong at it. In his
first collegiate game he sustained
a knee injury which sidelined him
for a month. Finally he submit-
ted to an operation on his ailing
joint the next spring and was
ready to go again.
Heneveld demonstrated his
versatility as a cog in the 1947
Rose Bowl steamroller. Although
he was not a regular, he shared
offensive guard chores with Dom
Tomasi, and helped Joe So-
boleski plug holes on defense.
"Dutch" distinguished himself
through most of that season until
the injury jinx tripped him again,

forcing the Hollander to miss the
last two games. He recovered in
time to visit Pasadena, however.
LAST YEAR Dutch came into
his own, accepting full time re-
sponsibility for the defensive left
guard assignment. But once again
his brilliant efforts were marred
by mishap, this time an injury to
his other knee. Last spring sur-
geons staged a repeat performance
on Heneveld, removing a cartilege.
This season he continues to be
a thorn in the side of opposing
backfields. H~e was especially
in evidence whenthe Wolver-
ines handcuffed Minnesota and
Illinois, to surge back into the
Western Conference title race.
Lloyd rates former Indiana
triple-threater, GeorgerTaliaferro,
as the toughest runner he has ever
been called upon to stop.

7he Red hi'e4

P)

STARTS MONDAY, NOV. 7 FOR ONE WEEK ONLY
2 PERFORMANCES DAILY: 2:30 P.M. & 8 P.M.
EXTRA MATINEE 5 P.M. SUN., NOV. 13
8 P.M. SHOW OVER 10:15 P.M.
SPECIAL STUDENT RATE!
FOR ALL PERFORMANCES
upon presentation
tax incl. of I.D. card.
BOX OFFICE NOW OPEN NOON 'TIL 8 P.M.

U

Erben, Dufek to Play in Purdue
Clash; Heneveld Still Doubtful

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77 -

As the Michigan football team
prepares for the invasion of a sud-
denly powerful Purdue Boilermak-
er aggregation, the question of the
physical condition of three mem-
bers of the Wolverine eleven looms
high on the list of worries of Head
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan.
Of the three, however, only
wingback Leo Koceski is consid-
ered as definitely side-lined for
Saturday's clash with the Gold and
Black.
* * *
DEFENSIVE GUARD Llo y d
Heneveld, who suffered a recur-
rence of an old knee injury in last
Saturday's battle with Illinois, is
still a question mark in the Wol-
verine camp. His playing in the
Purdue game will depend on how
the knee responds to treatment
this week.
Bob Erben's injury, dating
back to the Army game, has

handicapped the 190 - pound
center from Akron, Ohio, in the
three games since then, but he
should see action against the.
Boilermakers providing no com-
plications develop in practice.
Fullback Don Dufek, the only
other Michigan casualty in the
Illinois battle, is off the uncertain
list and will be ready to go again
this Saturday.
* * *
IN PRACTICE yesterday at
Ferry Field, Coach Oosterbaan
stressed ball handling in an at-
tempt to halt the mounting toll
of fumbles in the Michigan attack
in previous games.
Coach Don Robinson's Jay Vee
squad, complete with Purdue num-
bers on their jersies, gave the var-
sity an Ann Arbor preview of the
Boilermakers' T-formation offense
in a live scrimmage drill.

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