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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 01, 1949 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

THE MI HIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1949

BUSINESS BOOMING:
Lost and Found Items Awaiting Claiiii
11) * * ?It

By JIM BROWN
Found-a set of earrings, a tube
of brushless shaving cream and
several season's tickets to the Wol-
verines' home games.
If you are missing any of these
articles try checking with the
University Lost and Found De-
partment at the information desk
on the second floor of the Admin-
stration Building.
SUPiRVISED by Mrs. Aileen
Stout of the University Business
Office, the Lost and Found re-
ceives more than 25 articles a
week, ranging from pens, books,
cots and scarves, to wallets,
'watches and valuable jewelry.
Whenever a student returns
something to the office he is
given a claim check for that ar-
tiele, a duplicate of which is
immediately filed. If any possi-
ble clues as to the identity of the
owners are found on articles,
cards are sent out requesting
them to pick up their belong-
.ings.
If no one has called for lost
items within a period of two
months, they are given to the
finder upon presentation of his
claim check. Mrs. Stout pointed
out, however, that many students
do not claim the .articles which
they turn in.
* * *
BOOKS WHICH are not claimed
after the two month period are
sent to the General Library, while
all clothing is sent to the Social
Service Department of the Uni-
versity Hospital. Other articles
such as pens, pencils and note-
books are sent to various Univer-
sity departments.
Emphasizing that she always
has dozens of unclaimed articles
on hand, Mrs. Stout said, "I
wish more people would make
use of the lost and found. We
have several valuable articles
just waiting to be claimed."
Other lost and found offices are
run separately by the Union, the
Rackham Building and the
League,
Union Coffee Hour
Second in the current series of
student-faculty coffee hours will
be held from 4-5 p.m. today in
the Union Terrace Room.
This week the students and fac-
Uty of the sociology department
are the Union's honored guests.
YOU CAN DEPEND ON
HEINE'S BLEND
THE SMOKING TOBACCO WITH A
D.D.S. DEGREE
*Deep-Down Satisfaction
'IN,
-

-Daily-Alex Lmanian
DISPLACED PARAPHERNALIA-Mrs. Aileen Stout, supervisor of
the University Lost and Found Department, is shown examining
a portion of the smaller items which fall to her dominion. Coats,
jackets and bootery, though not pictured, are as numerous.
LATVIAN REFUGEE:
Lapkaas Voices DP's
Desire To Find Freedom
.>

By NANCY BYLAN
DP's have no future-this is the
bleakest aspect of life in the Ger-
man camps,- said Eizens Lapkass,
the University's newest displaced
student.
Lapkass, who reached Ann Ar-
bor Friday, was brought from a DP
camp in Germany by the Lutheran
Student Association in cooperation
with Zion and Trinity Lutheran
churches in Ann Arbor.
THE 19-YEAR-OLD Latvian
fled with his family from his na-
tive country to Pomerania when
the Russians entered the Baltic
area. A month before the end of
the war, threat of Russian inva-
sion of Pomerania sent them to
Schleswig-Holstein, where they
were taken into a DP camp.
Lapkass said the DP's are
willing and want to build up an
independent existence for them-
selves, but they can't get away
from the camps.
Germany has such a problem
with her own people that she is
unable to devote energies and re-
sources toward helping the DP's,
he added.
* * *
A CONSTANT FEAR of war in-
creases the desire of the DP's to
leave Germany, but rigid medical
examinations make this very dif-
ficult, Lapkass explained.
The United States and Aus-
tralia are the greatest hopes of
the DP's, according to Lapkass.
He ranked this country first be-
cause it is "famous for free-
dom."
All DP's admitted into the Unit-
ed States must have an assurance
from a sponsoring group. Aus-
tralia permits admission without a
sponsor, but DP's must sign a con-
tract promising to do whatever
work the government tells them to
do for a period of two years, Lap-
kass said.
THIS ARRANGEMENT is not

popular, he added. DP's feel they
can find better working opportuni-
ties in the United States.
California Meni
To Be Feted
At Reception
Dr. Thomas Barclay of Stan-
ford University and Dr. Wilbert
Hindman of the University of
Southern California will be hon-
ored at a reception scheduled for
4:30 p.m. today in the Hussey
Room of the Michigan League.
This will be the first in a series
of receptions in honor of distin-
guished political scientists spon-
sored by Pi Sigma Alpha, newly
inaugurated political science honor
fraternity.
DR. BARCLAY, former vice-
president of the American Politi-
cal Science Association, has been
a professor of political science at
Stanford since 1928.
He is considered an authority
on political parties, constitu-
tional law, national government,
legislation and public opinion.
Dr. Hindman is in charge of the
Visiting German Students Pro-
gram and is the author of many
books including "Modern Govern-
ments Abroad."
Editorial Cited
"Splinter Groups," an edi-
torial by Norma Jean Harelick
which appeared in The Daily
last week was aired on WUOM's
"The Editor Speaks" yesterday.
Outstanding editorials of the
week appearing in newspapers
throughout Michigan are pre-
sented on the WUOM program.

Civil Posts
Open to AII
June or February graduates de-
siring government jobs should take
the U.S. Civil Service Examina-
tions for junior professional as-
sistant, junior management as-
sistant, or junior agricultural as-
sistant, the Bureau of Appoint-
ments has announced.
The examinations will be given i
free of charge sometime this se-
mester in Ann Arbor.
Application cards may be ob-
tained at the Bureau of Appoint-
ments Office, 3528 Administration
Bldg., and must be submitted by
Nov. 8. All three positions have
a salary of $2,974 a year.
OPENINGS are for junior pro-
fessional assistants in 16 fields, in-
cluding architecture, biology, psy-
chology, statistics, economics and
geography.
Junior management positions
are for majors in business ad-
ministration and related sub-
jects.
Among the 18 fields open to
junior agricultural assistants are
plant pathology, botany, entomol-
ogy, forestry and genetics.
* * *
FOR MOST OF THE positions
there are openings in all regions
of the country, so applications are
not limited to those from any one
area, according to Miss Mildred
Webber, assistant to Dr. T. Luther
Purdom, director of the Bureau of
Appointments. Also, the jobs are
open to those with no practical
experience.
For some jobs, Miss Webber
pointed out, the government has
the best or the only openings. The
student would not be limiting him-
self to any one government de-
partment, either, because all de-
partments may hire people from
the Civil Service register.
For further information, stu-
dents may inquire at the Bureau
of Appointments Office.
German Stdeits
To Debate UJWF
Four German students will pre-
sent their views on European fed-
eration at a United World Fed-
eralist meeting at 7:30 today at
the Union.
Helmut Menhart and Gesine
Janssen will speak for the affirma-
tive on the question "Is a Peace-
ful and Prosperous Germany Pos-
sible without a European Federa-
tion?"
Sybil Fischer and Henry Bret-
ton, a teaching fellow in the polit-
ical science department, will take
the negative.
The forum is the first in a
series which will present foreign
students' views on European fed-
eration.
It doesn't seem possible
but calendars don't lie.
It's time for us
to say goodbye.
We ore now closed for the season.
We thank you for your patronage
and hope to see you here again
next spring.
YPSI-ANN DRIVE IN

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .50 1.02 1.68
3 .60 1.53 2.52
4 .80 2.04 4.80
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
--- FOR SALE
THE BUSIEST STUDENTS READ TIME.
You should too. Ph. 2-82-42. )3
PARAKEETS-Babies and mated pairs.
Exhibition quality birds from prize
winning stock. Both male and female
parakeets can be trained to talk. 562
S. Seventh, near W. Madison. )2B
NEARLY NEW SMITH-CORONA port-
able typewriter. Paid $80. Sell for $60.
Call Lamb, 8688 or 4156. )44
EVEN STUDENTS who aren't busy read

FOR SALE1
CALKIN'S FLETCHER BEAUTY BAR-
is now featuring Dorothy Gray "3
iCheers' lipstick. Priced at only 3 for
81.00. Also Tussy, Chenyu, Lucien Le-
Long, Tabu, and Harriet Hubbard
Ayer.)5
THE BUSIEST STUDENTS READ TIME
Student Periodical Agency. >3
FOUR TICKETS for Purdue game. Call
Robinson 2-7862, leave message. )47
PRESTO K-8 RECORDER - National
high powered receiver. Both almost
new. Cheap. Call Teachout Record-
ing Studio, 5118.)4
BMOC'S read TIME read TIME read
TiE read TIME read.(elassified
ads Gertrude Stein style--for trans-
lation, phone 2-82-42).
SAVE MONEYI
Gabardine Pants--$4.95; Michigan
Sweat-Shirts-$1.95. Na y .T"FShirts
45c; All Wool Swecat Socks---490
U.S. Navy-Army Type Oxfords--.$6.88
Open until 6:30 p.m.
SAM'S STORE, 122 E. Washington )6
BEAUTIFUL new log cabin, modern,
located in Glenbrook subdivision,
Half Moon Lake, partly furnished..
Phone owner, 8320. )98
NEARLY NEW Smith-Corona portable
typewriter. Paid $80. Sell for $60. )441
FOR SALE-New English bicycle. Corn-
plete with accessories. x45. Call Ypsi-

TIME. Student rates. )3 ani 2926XR. )451
ENGLISH MEN'S BIKE- Never used. - ---,---
Gears. $50. Box 208. )49 ROOMS FOR RENT
ASSORTED NECK-TIES -- - -- -
and RIBBON SCARFS BRING YOUR weekend guests to the
for all girls, ierce Transient Home exceptAfor
59c and up. Ohio State game. 1133 East Ann<
COUSIN'S Phone 8144. )16Rt
on State Street ) 2 -
- - ~et>2- "- ----
THE BUSIEST students read TIME t ROOMS -Redecorated for Boys auto
reduced student rates. )3music hot water. 2 blcks from cam
PAIR OF TICKETS-Purdue, Ohio, In- pus 120 N Ingalls. Ph2
diana games. Reasonable. Ph. 2-7981. NICE, CLEAN ROOM--$5.00. 1206
)48 Wright. Phone 5979. )28R
ffloAthju9gCffee hAep
1204 South University
.- .serving.
BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS and DINNERS
SANDWICHES and SALADS
..-. frorn . -.
7:00A.M. to 1:00 P.M. and 5:00 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Closed Sundays
Most any f
ROLL-FILM CAMERA rF
will take'
FULL-COLOR SNAPSHOTS
with Kodacolor Film
We have all popular sizes for ROLL FILM CAMERAS
KODACOLOR FILM (Daylight) for outdoor shots
and KODACOLOR FILM, TYPE A, for snaps at
night using regular flash or flood lighting. Stop
in today and get a roll or two for your camera.
CALKINS=-FLETCHERI
7ruv Stores
324 South State 818 South State
Save on our
STUDENT
BUNDLE!1
4 LBS. MINIMUM ......50c
Each Additional Pound... 12c
All clothing laundered, fluff dried, and neatly folded.
The following articles are finished at low extra charges
as follows-
SHIRTS, additional . ... .15c
HANDKERCHIEFS ......2c

t
S

TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of all makes u-
Sold,
Bought,
Repaired, ,..
Rented
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
G. 1. Requisitions Accepted
MORRILL'S
314 South State St.

Having Guests
Purdue, Indiana,
or Ohio State
Weekends?
CALL THE STUDENT
ROOM BUREAU
2-9850 for reservations
between 12 & 1 and 6 & 7

BUSINESS SERVICES
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmy Hunt Dance Studio
209 S. Slate Street
Phone 8161 ) lP
LEARN TO FLY
Flying Club, Private Courses
and G.T. Courses
GRIDLEY AIRPORT
Phoie Ypsi, 9272 )171B
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
Van Doren ClarinetReeds
Box of 25-$4.50
New and Used instruments
209 E. Washigton )4B
iAVE YOUR TYPEWRITER REPAIRED
be the G~liue Equipment. Service Co..
215 5 Liberty. ^ 6B
'hual .. - Niie hour service (by re-
:,est :. three day service (regular ser-
.:: ). Ace Luudrv. 1116 S. Univeritv.
)21B1
109 E. Washington
Expert Alterations
Custom Clothes
Established Tradition )3B
I'FIr1ClENT. EXPERT-prompt Type-
writer Repair Service. Mosely's Type-
writer and Supply Company. 214)E.
Washington. Phone 5888. )5B
WASHINGTON and/or ironing done in
myownbon h e. Free pick-up and de-
livery>' Phone 2-9020. )1B
STUDENT TYPING -- Expertly done,
Reasonable rates. Will call for and
deliver. Call '341. )26B
SHORTHAND and General Typing
Manuscripts-Theses--Cbrrespondence
Call 2-8026 or 2-6416. )24B
GRESTING CARDS inscribed in colors.
10c each or $1.00 per box. J. A. Early,
402 Observatory. Phone 2-8606. )8B
TYPING
Pickup and Delivery Service, 2-1282
)22B
PHOTO-ENGRAVING
4-hour service at Reasonable Charges
On High Quality Engraving
Mwriian Daily, 420 Maynard
Phone 2-:3241

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Black Shaeffey Pen in lobby of
New Women's Dorm Saturday morn-
ing.8Reward. Call Paula Harrington.
2-6581. ) 64L
LOST-Black leather glove, sheepskin
lining, left haid. Size D. Reward.
Phone 2-6032. )60L
LOST-on radiator inside front door
of Angell Hall. Glasses in brown case
and Schaeffer Pen. Marian Bennett.
Phone 7015. ) 63T,
LOST-Black scotty. Male with crook
in its tail. Reward. Tel. 24739._ )61L
LOST--Back leather glove, sheepskii
lining, let hand. Size D. Reward.
Phone 2-6032. )60L
TAN LOOSE LEAF ZIPPER NOTE-
BOOK, Wednesday, Oct. 26 at Pret-
zel Bell. Reward for conitents. No
questions asked. Call Stan 2-3533.
459L
HELP WANTED
SALESLADY-Experienced in ready-to-
wear. Full and part time. References
from your previous employer request-
ed. Apply in person. The Budget
Shop, 611 E. Libe>ty. )7H
PERSONAL
MEAT BALLS with spaghetti supper at
Eagles' Hall.A1iven by Ladles' Aux-
iliary of G.A.P.A. Nov. 2, 5:30 p.m.
1.00. )22P
)22P
WE'RE BORED! We'd like some good
dates! Intention definitely not mar-
riage! All we ask is that you be over
21, at least six feet tall, and have a
good sense of humor. We prefer Amer-
icans, since we can't party-vous es-
panol beaucoup. Reply to Box 207
Michigan Daily. )23P
UNSIGHTLY HAIR removed perma-
nently. Short wave method ap-
proved by Am. Med. Ass'n., 5 Nickels
Arcade._Ph. 2-6696. _ )12B
WANTED TO RENT
GARAGE in the neighborhood of Oak-
land and Forest. Call 6876 after G. )3N

'i

I

Read and Use Daily Classified Ads
1lI

,T:.HEATRE

Ending Wednesday
Continues from 1 P.M.

.5 -

35c until 5 P.M.

I I

I

9

On the Screen '
...the Riotous
Gal of Radior
Cw { JOHN MARIE
- - LUND -*WILSON
DIANA as BRMA
I R
LYNN "DON DeFORE
---- -- __ - and introducing Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis
Thursday - "MADAM BOVARY"
AT YOUR SERVICE
around the clock.?
DIAL 4500 for:
PROMPTER SERVICE
EXPERIENCED DRIVERS
ETER ,AN CAB CO.

y

U

CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA
GEORGE SZELL, Conductor
Sunday, Nov. 6, 7 P.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM
Tickets $3.00 - $2.40 - $1.80
University Musical Society, Burton Tower

From the makers of the tooth powder
exclusively NAMED in Reader's Digest-
Now! .Asurol
in oothPse

Continuous

from 1 P.M.

~E~LUI

Licensed by
University of Illinois Foundation
- 1

- Today &

Wednesday -1

.m

Reduced Prices

CONTINUOUS FROM 1:30
MATINEES 25c NIGHTS 35c
STARTS
TODAY .:'
2:50 - 6:00
9:25
9a~e R" od"
HAVIR " BOLGER " MadRA
--

STUDENT BUNDLE

4 lbs. for 50c
12c each additional lb.

Finished

EXTRA
Shirts........
Sox ............
Handkerchief ....

S.15
.02
.02
.30

EconlOmy Size
S 01
ONLY AMUROL DOES ALL SXI
1. Stops growth of acid forming
haceri a.

SOX, pair...............2c
Dress shirts and silk or wool sport shirts slightly higher.
PICK-UP and DELIVERY SERVICE
Phone 234--43

Pants ..........

4. Strengthens nature's immunity to
tooth decay.
S_ er - nrc - m r t% Mnt c-rfre

I

I

H I

!I

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