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October 30, 1949 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IMAGE EIGHIT

r THE MICHIGAN D)AILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1949

,i

University Scholarship1948-49
110

FiIl

Duys

Face

'U

ournalists

General Scholarship
Grade-Point Averages*

Group 1947-48
Women's Cooperative Housing 2.68
Men's Cooperative Housing ... . 2.72
General Sororities ............2.64
All Women...... ..........2.65
Independent Women .........2.65
Men's Residence Halls ........2.56
Women's Residence Hails ......2.69
Independent Men ..............2.56
All Men and Women .........2.57
All M en .....................2.55
General Fraternities ..........2.49
Freshmen Men ...............2.46
All Freshmen .................2.46
Freshman Women .... ....2.46

'48-'49 Ch.

2.88
2.68
2.64
2.61
2.60
2.58
2.56
2.56
2.56
2.54
2.46
2.45
2.42
2.36

.20
-.04
.00
-.04
-.05
.02
-.13
.00
-.01
-.01
-.03
-.01
-.04
-.10

4
6
7
8
8
10
11
12
12
12
15
15
17
18
19

Kappa Kappa Gamma . .. .108
Alpha Xi Delta...........84
Pi Beta Phi .............. 98
GENERAL SORORITIES ..
Alpha Chi Omega ........ 98
Delta Gamma ............ 98
Alpha Delta Pi .......... 81
ALL WOMEN ............
Kappa Delta .............. 93
Alpha Gamma Delta ......104
Kappa Alpha Theta .......91
Delta Delta Delta ........101
Alpha Omicron Pi ........ 92
Collegiate Sorosis .........95
Alpha Phi ................102
Delta Zeta ...............71
Zeta Tau Alpha .......... 61
* * *

2.71
2.69
2.66
2.64
2.63
2.63
2.62
2.61
2.60
2.59
2.59
2.59
2.56
2.56
2.55
2.50
2.49

*Dental, Graduate, Law, Medical, Nursing
and Public Health students have not been in-
cluded in this survey.
r * *
Fraternity Scholarship Chart

Ti
Rank Group Co
1 Zeta Beta Tau ............
2 Acacia ...................
3 Kappa Nu ...............
4 Phi Sigma Delta ..........:
4 Sigma Alpha Mu ..........
4 Chi Phi ...................
4 Phi Kappa Tau ..........
ALL MEN ................

erms
unted
192
99
46
138
171
113
88

8 Pi Lambda Phi ............120
9 Triangle.................61
10 Theta Xi .................148
10 Theta Chi..............175
10 Sigma Chi ................164
13 Sigma Phi Epsilon ........171
13 Tau Delta Phi ............ 46
15 Trigon ................... 65
15 Lambda Chi Alpha ........141
17 Sigma Nu ................132
17 Beta Theta Pi ............119
19 Phi Kappa Psi ............110
GENERAL FRATERNITIES
19 Phi Gamma Delta ........160
19 Theta Delta Chi......... 94
19 Phi Delta Theta ........198
23 Kappa Sigma ............117
23 Phi Kappa Sigma .........61
25 Psi Upsilon ..............113
26 Phi Sigma Kappa ........158
27 Delta Upsilon ............126
27 Tau Kappa Epsilon .......40
29 Zeta Psi ................120
29 Alpha Delta Phi ........115
31 Delta Kappa Epsilon ......122
32 Sigma Phi...............79
33 Delta Tau Delta ..........134
34 Alpha Sigma Phi ..........113
34 Sigma Alpha Epsilon ......128
36 Delta Chi................ 91
37 Alpha Tau Omega ........190
38 Delta Sigma Phi..........36
39 Chi Psi.................95
40 Alpha Phi Alpha .......... 44
Sorority Scholarship
Terms
Rank Group Counted
1 Alpha Epsilon Phi ........103
2 Chi Omega ..............101
3 Sigma Delta Tau .......... 79
4 Gamma Phi Beta .........101

Gr.-Point
Average
2.72
2.67
2.65
2.55
2.55
2.55
2.55
2.54
2.53
2.52
2.51
2.51
2.51
2.49
2.49
2.48
2.48
2.47
2.47
2.46
2.46
2.46
2.46
2.46
2.45
2.45
2.44
2.42
2.40
2.40
2.39
2.39
2.37
2.36
2.35
2.34
2.34
2.33
2.32
2.31
2.29
2.26
Chart
Gr.-Point
Average
2.86
2.75
2.74
2.71

Residence Halls Scholarship C
Terms Gr.
Rank Group Counted Ave
1 Mary Markley House ......36
2 Martha Cook Building . . . .259
3 Henderson House .........32
4 Adelia Cheever House .... 48
5 Helen Newberry Residence 194
6 Winchell House ..........322
6 730 Haven .... (Fall Only) 28
8 Adams House ............364
8 Strauss House ...........387
8 V. Vaughan House (Spring
Only-Men) ............170
11 Betsy Barbour House ......226
11 Michigan House ..........354
13 Chicago House ............324
14 Williams House ..........380
15 Mosher Hall ..............532
MEN'S RESIDENCE HALLS
15 Tyler House ..............309
17 Prescott House ............327
17 Hayden House ............404
17 Anderson House ......:...338
17 Allen-Rumsey House ......318
WOMEN'S RESIDENCE
HALLS...............
21 Jordan Hall.............468
21 Stockwell Hall ..........1005
23 Greene House ............310
24 Lloyd House ..............315
24 Wenley House ............365
26 Fletcher Hall .............223
26 Cooley House ............372
28 Hinsdale House ..........331
29 New Women's Residence
(Spring Only) ..........231
30 V. Vaughan House (Fall Only-
Women) ...............177
31 Couzens Hall (Excluding
Nurses)...............158
Cooperative Houses

hart
-Point
erage
2.79
2.77
2.73
2.70
2.68
2.65
2.65
2.64
2.64

'U' Journal isi Majors Take
Future Careers Seriously
Gum-chewing, fuzzy-brained reporters are strictly for the movies,
as far as the University's journalism department is concerned.
Learning the tricks and techniques of sound writing is a serious
business for the 154 fledgling journalists over at Haven Hall.
* * * *
Their last two undetgraduate years are packed with activity.
Besides balanced class work in the social sciences, humanities and
journalism, they integrate their studies through the writing, editing
and composing of the Michigan Journalist, an experimental newspaper
which rolls off the presses monthly.
Journalism concentrates also attend frequent University
lectures in journalism, meetings and coffee hours. For two weeks
each semester, they trek down to the composing room of the
Ann Arbor Daily News after regular classes, where they spend
their evenings learning the practical aspects of putting a news-
paper together.
During their undergraduate days, these students take courses in
community newspaper work, law of the press, critical writing and
reviewing and advertising, all aimed towards giving them a
comprehensive view of the various phases of publications work.
AFTER GRADUATION, many return for graduate work in the
department. At present, 23 students are studying in the department's
graduate school. Four of them are European students doing post-
doctoral work in the field. Two of these are now serving internships
on daily newspapers in the state.
DAILY PICTURE PAGE
Story by DICK THOMAS Photos by WALLY BARTH

.

2.64
2.62
2.62
2.61
2.60
2.58
2.58
2.58
2.57
2.57
2.57
2.57
2.56
2.56
2.56
2.54
2.52
2.52
2.51
2.51
2.49
2.42
2.35
2.26

THE FACULTY-Composition of the University's journalism department changes from year to
year. A nucleus of permanent faculty members provides necessary continuity within the department,
while visiting instructors and lecturers supply fresh insight on the various phases of practical
journalism. The influx and outgo of newsmen makes it possible for the department to provide work
in such varied fields as pictorial journalism and advertising copy-writing. The present faculty of the
department includes, seated left to right, Prof. Donal H. Haines, Prof. Wesley H. Maurer, chairman,
visiting lecturer Laurence Prakken and Prof. Edmund Wooding. Standing, left to right, are visiting
lecturer Karl F. Zeisler, Dean C. Baker, visiting lecturer Waldo McNaught and Elwood Lohela.

t
Jg

I

Terms
Rank Group Counte
1 Muriel Lester Cooperative
House.................35
WOMEN'S COOPERATIVE
HOUSES.............
2 Osterweil Cooperative House 34
3 Stevens Cooperative House 29
4 John M. Nakamura Cooperative
House.................76
MEN'S COOPERATIVE
HOUSES ...............
5 Michigan Cooperative House 67
6 Robert Owen Cooperative
House .................. 44

s Gr.-Point
;ed Average

2.92
2.88
2.87
2.85
2.76
2.68
2.63
2.60

INFORMATION, PLEASE-An integral part of any department
is provided by the secretary's office. Ably filling the posts in -the
journalism depairtmnent are Helen Gregory, right, and Mrs. Mar-
jorie Luce, center. Miss Gregory is shown supplying information
to Robert Bailyn, Grad., while Mrs. Luce operates the mimeograph
machine. Knowing the ins and outs of the department is second
nature to Miss Gregory, who graduated from the University in
journalism in 1948.

COPY EDITING-With the arrival this year of an AP teletype machine a new faculty member was
added to the journalism department staff to instruct students in its use. He is visiting lecturer
Arthur Gallagher, telegraph editor of the Ann A.bor News. The large copy desk shown above pro-
vides the atmosphere of a big city newsroom for Gallagher's classes. Copy from the AP teletype
machine supplies material for the students to practice copy reading, editing, rewriting and headline
writing. In classes such as this, aspiring journalists learn the techniques and tricks of the trade
which they will later embody in their laboratory newspaper, The Michigan Journalist. In the picture
above, Gallagher conducts a class in teletype editing. Since AP copy comes over the wire written
entirely in capital letters, a large part of the editor's job is to mark it for proper capitalization.
They are also expected to check spelling and style.

'U' Law Students Will Assist
In Planned Local Legal Clinic

Establishment of a Legal Aid
Clinic which would provide law,
services for Ann Arbor towns-
people unable' to afford regular
assistance may soon be realized.
Under the supervision of a local
lawyer, the clinic would also give
University law students opportun-
ity to become acquainted with the,
research, leg work and writing of
'various legal documents connect-
ed with "charity" cases.
THE CLINIC WOULD BE op-
erated by the Legal Aid Commit-
-tee of the Law Students Associa-
tion in conjunction with the local
Bar Association which has ap-
pointed a special committee to
consider the proposal.
Purpose of the Law Students
Association (LSA) is to promote
and coordinate all extra-curric-
ular activities of the Law School.
As a charter member of the
American Law Student Associa-
tion, LSA is now engaged in a
nation-wide program.
* * *
ORIGINATED during the La-
bor Day week-end in conjunction
with the annual American Bar
Association Convention, LSA has
Speech on Energy
Prof. Farrington Daniels of the
University of Wisconsin chemistry
department will speak on "Atomic
and Solar Energy" at a Sigma Xi
meeting 8 p.m. tomorrow in Kel-
logg Auditorium.
Prof. Daniels has been a con-
sultant on atomic power and a
member of the board of governors
of the Argonne National Labora-
tory, an atomic research center in
Chicago, since 1946.
I TYPEWRITERS I]

a membership of 48 approved law
schools.
LSA has as its purpose the
promotion of social and aca-
demic inter-law school relations
and stimulation of intra-district
activities.
Plans for panel discussions
within each district concerning
important legal questions are un-
derway, according to F. Bourne
Upham III, '50L, a vice-president
of the sixth judicial circuit.
PLANS for a Law School news-
paper, which will come under the
jurisdiction of LSA, have recently
been launched.
Law School activities and news
of the legal world in general will
be covered by the proposed paper.
Prof. A. F. Smith of the Law
School is assisting students with
organization of the newspaper
which will not be an official pub-
lication of the Law School.

'U' Men Seek
Rhodes Award
Five candidates for the 1950
Rhodes Scholarships have been
selected to represent the Univer-
sity in the state contest to be
held in Detroit Dec. 7, Prof. Clark
Hopkins, Rhodes Scholarship
committee chairman, announced
yesterday.
They are John P. White, '49,
Peter V. Hamill, '52M, Richard B.
Gushee, '50L, Harold K. Jacobson,
'51, and William C. Fox, Grad.
THE STATE committee will
screen outstanding applicanits
from Michigan, who will represent
the state at the District Commit-
tee meeting, which will finally se-
lect four men from Michigan, Wis-
consin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio and
Kentucky.
The scholarships, which pro-
vide for two years of study at Ox-
ford University,

FUTURE HUCKSTERS-In step with the times, the journalism
department added an advertising expert to its staff this year-
Prof. Edmund Wooding. Prof. Wooding brings to his new post
practical know-how in the field from experience with a New York
advertising agency. In the above photo, he explains technicalities
of ad copy to Allen Numore, '50, far left, and Berdan Peck, '50,
for their classes in advertising public relations.

CRITICISM - One of the de-
partment's four foreign students
is -shown above getting some
pointers on the laboratory news-
paper, the Michigan Journalist,
from Prof. Wesley H. Maurer,
acting chairman of the depart-
ment. The student is Hanns M.
Stumpf, a post-doctoral fellow
from Munich, Germany.

STUDENT INTERVIEW-An important phase of any journalism
course is interviewing and reporting. Mary Brown, Grad., is shown
above questioning Prof. A. H. Hawley, of the sociology department.
Later she will write up the details in the proper style.

A

1.-

X11

LAST CALL
ONE MORE DAY
... for our . .
18th ANNIVERSARY
SALE
Discounts from
20 to 50 per cent
on all merchandise.

,.

Select your HOME NEEDS, WEDDING, and
CHRISTMAS GIFTS from our many excellent bar-
gains including - handkerchiefs, scarfs, colored
and embroidered percale sheets and cases. Also
blankets, rugs, bath room and shower curtains

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