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October 28, 1949 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-28

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FIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 194

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

I'

'M'

ridders

Michigan and California
Picked by Grid Pollster

By AUSTIN BEALMEAR
NEW YORK - (VP) - When the
roof fell in last week, this football
forecaster was buried under the
wave of upets along with some of
the better teams. As a result, our
average for the first half of the
season dropped to .774 on 253 cor-
rect guesses and 74 misses. But
this is another week and we're of-
fering these predictions for what
they're worth, with the Associ-
ated Press rankings in parenthe-
ses:'
CALIFORNIA (4) VS. UCLA
(20)-First place in the Pacific
Coast Conference is at stake here.
California has won all six starts,
three of them in the Conference.
The Uclans have won five out of
six, four in league play. Their only
less was to Santa Clara, a team
which California whipped 21-7.
Looks like the Bears will go to the
Rose Bowl unbeaten. California.
MICHIGAN (6) VS. ILLINOIS
Look who's leading the Big Ten,
an Illinois team that has won
only two games. That's what
Michigan's victory over Minne-
sota did to the standings. They'll
be all season untangling that
mess, but the Wolverines are on
the beam now and should help
clarify the situation here. One
confident vote for Michigan.
NOTRE DAME (1) VS. NAVY-
If there was one team in the coun-
try that didn't need a week's rest,
it was Notre Dame. After an open
date, the Irish are set to heap
more troubles on the bloodied nog-
gins of the Midshipmen, who al-
ready have more than their share.
As usual, Notre Dame.
TEXAS (19) VS. SOUTHERN
METHODIST (11)-With Doak
Walker still a little shaky and his
No. 1 replacement out with a brok-
en finger, the Methodists are in
for a rough afternoon. But Texas
seems to run out of gas in the
stretch. Probably close. Out of the
hat, Southern Methodist.

TENNESSEE VS. NORTH
CAROLINA (13)-Once upon a
time you could depend on form
in the Solid South. But not this
season. North Carolina lost to
LSU, which lost to Georgia,
which lost to Miami. Still, the
choice here is North Carolina.
NORTHWESTERN VS. OHIO'
STATE (18)-Figure this one out.
Minnesota beat both of them, yet
Northwestern dumped Michigan,
which stopped Minnesota. But the
Buckeyes are one touchdown fa-
vorites. So be it. Ohio State.
IOWA STATE VS. OKLAHOMA
(3) - Somebody may solve the
powerful offense of the hard-run-
ning Sooners before the season
ends but it isn't likely to be Iowa
State. Another notch in a perfect
record. Oklahoma.
OREGON VS. IOWA-Having
whipped Northwestern, Iowa
now looks strong enough to han-
dle an Oregon team that has lost
twice. Iowa.
Pennsylvania (9) over Pitts-
burgh, Cornell (8) over Columbia,
Dartmouth over Yale, Princeton
over Rutgers, Penn State over
Syracuse, Harvard over Holy
Cross, Fordham over Georgetown,
Army over Virginia Military, Du-
quesne over St. Louis, Lehigh over
NYU.
Minnesota (7) over Purdue,
Wisconsin over Indiana, Michigan
State (12) over Temple, Missouri
(16) over Nebraska, Kansas over
Kansas State, Marquette over
Colorado State, Tulsa over Wichi-
ta, Louisville over Bradley, Brown
over Western Reserve, Miami
(Ohio) over Western Michigan,
Wayne over Niagara, North Da-
kota State over North Dakota,
South Dakota over South Dakota
State, Ohio University over Mar-
shall, Toledo over Oklahoma City,
Washington University over Colo-
rado College.

Leave
Team Faces
Indian Squad
Less Koceski*
36 Men Make
Champaign Trip
A revitalized band of Michigan
Wolverines, 36 strong, will leave
Ann Arbor at 7:45 this morning
for the land of the Fighting Illini,
but they will be leaving without
the services of Leo Koceski.
While the 165 pound halfback
from Canonsburg, Pa. will go
along as a spectator, a practice-
sustained injury has kept him
from being carried on the official
traveling roster.
* * * -
THE SQUAD will go first to
Milan, Mich., and from there to
Champaign by train. Coach Ben-
nie Oosterbaan expects to have hi
Wolverines in Champaign in time
this afternoon to go through a
final polishing-up before taking
the field against Illinois' Big Ten
leaders tomorrow afternoon.
Outside of Koceski, the only
other members of the team not
in top physical condition are
center Bob Erban and end Bob
Hollway. Both are still bothered
by previous game injuries but
are expected to see action
against the Illini.
For the second time this sea-
son the Wolverines will be wear-
ing their white jersies instead of
their traditional blues.
* * *
IN THEIR LAST appearance
wearing the whites, the Michigan
squad was upset by Northwestern,
21-20, at Evanston. Coach Ooster-
baan, however, doesn't believe in
jinxes and is not worrying about
the switch.
At Ferry Field yesterday af-
ternoon, the Wolverine squad
didn't seem to be jinx-conscious
either as they ran througn
their final Ann Arbor practice
session.
With Charlie Ortmann, Wally
Teninga and Chuck Lentz han-
dling the passing duties, the
Michigan aerial game was click-
ing with the precision typical of
great Wolverine teams of pre-
vious years.
WHILE NOT engaging in any
heavy contact work, the squad
was subjected to a variety of
drills designed to maintain the
efficiency displayed in the Min-
nesota game.
Defense against Illinois' pass-
ing and running attack, punting
and punt-blocking drills and a
dummy scrimmage in which the
Michigan offense received the fi-
nal touches kept the Wolverines
busy until after dark.

for

* * *

*

'-N

x

Illinois

Grange Saga Fires Illini
For Crucial 'M' Contest

(*2

By BILL BRENTON
Just 25 years ago a red-headed
halfback from the University of
Illinois ran onto the Champaign
turf to do battle with a mighty
Michigan team that had won 15
straight games.
Within 12 short minutes, the
youngster had raced to four quick
touchdowns through a Wolverine
defense which had yielded only
one six-pointer in 10 games. The
final Michigan humiliation read
39-14.
THAT HALFBACK, Harold
"Red" Grange, Illinois' greatest
All-American, and that Saturday's
story are now legend.
But now, on a 1949 Saturlay,
another Michigan powerhouse
invades the Indian camp in a
determined effort to regain Big
Ten emminence after upsetting
giant Minnesota a week ago.
The "Galloping Ghost" will be
there, but only as a spectator on
hand to help celebrate Bob
Zuppke Day.
* * *
THIS WEEK the name of a
aew speedster is on the lips of
Illini followers. Orange and Blue
fans are erpressing a hushed hope
that sophomore sensation Johnny
Karras can near-duplicate
Grange's feat of a quarter-century
ago.
Karras, indeed, has done
everything expected of a second
Grange. The prep 440-yard

Today

champ from Argo, Ill., has been
the terror of opposing lines, rac-
ing 440 yards on 65 tries against
the five Indian foes.
In pacing a Fighting Illini of-
fense which leads the Western
Conference, the 5 foot 11 inch
rambler has compiled an amazing
7.3 yards-per-try average in Big
Ten play. He carried 347 yards in
47 attempts.
ps* * *
THE WOLVERINE defense
faces more than the Karras prob-
lem, however. He only heads a
group of hard-running first year
backs, all averaging over four
yards-per-carry.
After setting out a year's in-
eligibility, Dick "Rocky" Raklo-
vits has raced 100 yards in 14 runs,
while sophomores Din Stevens
and Ronnie Clark are of the fleet
Grange type.
Then there's Bernie Krueger
to 6 foot 4 inch Walt "Slip"
Kersulis through the air. This
duo scored or set up the highest
TD total against Michigan's
1948 National championship
eleven.
The Wolverines will be a 13-
point favorite when they take the
sod of Illinois's Memorial Stadium
tomorrow, but the statistically
best offensive and defensive team
in the Conference fired by the
Grange saga of 1924 could give
the Michiganders a busy after-
noon.

Swimmers Prove Jap
A thletics on Upswing
National Coach Finishes Collegiate Tour;
Leaves Impressive Record in America
a

-Daily-Alex Lmanian
LEO KOCESKI
.... Convalescing

BOB VOKAC, Night Editor

By HUGH QUINN
Japanese youth have turned
their physical efforts since the
War from military training to in-
dividual and team athletics.
And Masaji Kiyokawa, Japan's
national swimming coach, feels
that international athletic compe-
tition can go a long way toward
furthering friendly relations be-
tween his country and the rest of
the world.
KIYO, WHOSE official designa-
tion is Chairman of the Coaches'
Committee of the National Swim-
ming Association, stopped in Ann
Arbor Wednesday, and in an inter-
view on the side of the varsity
pool, told of his efforts and results
in rebuilding Japan's sports pro-
gram.
General Douglas MacArthur,
Allied military governor of Ja-
pan, asked Kiyo to come to
America last spring. His purpose
in coming here was to investi-
gate American training methods,
talk with coaches, and see the
American swimmers in action.
But Kiyo also brought with him
evidence that he has been accom-
plishing something since he start-
ed coaching in 1943. He entered a
six-man team in the National
Amateur Athletic Union meet last
August at Los Angeles.
THESE SIX swimmers walked
off with the honors at that meet.
Together, they managed to collect
five first places, including four
new world records; three seconds,
five thirds, two fourths, and a
sixth place.
Hironshin Furuhashi alone
accounted for three world marks
and swam a leg on a record-set-
ting 800-meter relay team. He
lowered the existing marks in
the 400-, 800-, and 1,500-meter
free style events.
Kiyo said that when the team
returned to Japan, they told the
press of their stay in America,
and of what they considered "ex-
cellent hospitality." Their reports
were well received by the Japanese
people, who hope to eventually re-
sume a full-scale international
sports program.
HE CONTINUED by saying that
before Japan can even be consid-
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111111

ered for the 1952 Olympics, they
must be accepted by the various
international sports committees.
Swimming was the first sport to
be readmitted.
He has plans for inviting a
ten-man team from the United
States to compete in Japan next
summer.
When asked to compare the
training programs of Japan and
the United States, Kiyo said that
in his country, the season is only
six months long, because of the
lack of indoor facilities, and con-
sequently, the training is more
concentrated.
Kiyo himself is a swimmer of
note. In the 1932 Olympics at Los
Angeles, he won the 100-meter
backstroke. In 1936 he placed third
in the same event.
LATE HOCKEY SCORES
Detroit 3, Chicago 1
Toronto 2, Montreal 0

11 active ingredients
in 1 cough syrup

It

THINCLADS UNDER WRAPS:
Cross-Country Performs Hushed Role

I,'°

.r
i
,.

XMAS
WRAPPING KIT

With "K ng Footbali" sitting
majestically on his throne and
dominating the athletic world
when the fall months roll around,
few sports enthusiasts stop to
think that perhaps there are
other sports in action this time of
the year.
And if you look below the var-
sity football lockerroom down in
Yost Field House, you'll find that
there's just as much activity tak-
ing place on the first floor as
there is upstairs where the men
of the "beef-trust" are lacing up
their shoulder pads and cleated
shoes.
* * *
IT'S IN THIS first floor locker-
room that you'll find the un-
sung, hard-working members of

Coach Don Canham's cross-
countty squad.
But these men are not work-
ing out every day just because
they like the scenery on the
four-mile cross-country course
that snakes its way over hills
and through woods on the Uni-
versity Golf Course.
Any track coach, realizing the
importance of early conditioning,
will speak firmly in favor of the
fall workouts that harden his dis-
tance runners for the long indoor-
outdoor track season.
* * *
CROSS-COUNTRY is probably
one of the most grueling of all
sports. A high-school track coach
,in Detroit once expressed this

fact very aptly when he remarked
to his team:
"They say that football is
rugged because you're out there
for sixty minutes crashing
skulls together. But cross-
country is a lot more rugged
than that. In football, it's the
other man that's hitting you,
but in running a four mile race,
it's purely self-inflicted murder.
You're hitting yourself from the
inside, and that's where it really
hurts. It takes sheer determina-
tion and a lot of guts when it
feels as if you're pulling a sled
loaded with lead behind you,
while running against a brick
wall."
Truer words were never spoken,

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U

rDAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN '

(1

I

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Rentals
TUXS and TAILS
All Sizes - All New

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the Office of the
Assistant to the President, Room 2552
Administration Building, by 3:00 p.m.
on the day preceding publication
(11:00 a.m. Saturdays).
Notices
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1949
VOL. LX, No. 29
Application blanks for the Law
School Admission Test to be giv-
en Nov. 12 are available at the Bu-
reau of Psychological Services,
110 Rackham Bldg. Applications
are due in Princeton, New Jersey
not later than Wed., Nov. 2.
Students, registering with the
Bureau of Appointments, who are
graduating or who will be avail-
able for placement in February,
1950, are reminded that their reg-
istration material is due at the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528
Administration Building, on Fri.,
Oct. 28.
Curtiss-Wright Scholarships:
The scholarships of $500 each are
11______________

for one year. The remaining
scholarship is open to stu-
dents who have completed at
least the freshman year of study
in the Engineering College, or its
equivalent, and whose field of in-
terest is manufacturing and pro-
duction. To be eligible, students
must be American citizens, par-
tially self-supporting, with an
academic standing above average.
Applications should be filed with
Professor H. W. Miller, Chairman
of the Committee on Scholarships,
Room 414 West Engineering Build-
ing, by November 1st.
To Instructors of Engineering
Freshmen: Five-week grades for
all Engineering Freshmen are due
in Dean Crawford's Office on Fri.,
Nov. 4. Report blanks will be fur-
nished by Campus mail.
Approved Student sponsored So-
cial Events for the coming week-
end:
Friday
Alpha Gamma Delta, Beta Theta
Pi, Chi Omega, Congregational-
(Continued on Page 4)

~ "
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That's the gist of this year's fashion de-
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JOE HARRIS FORECAST

for Oct. 29th
........21 Illinois ..........
........21 Northwestern .....

Michigan ...
Ohio State.
Wisconsin ..
Minnesota.

.7
.7
14

.21
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Indiana ... .
Purdue

. . . . . .

1

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....... 7

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