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October 27, 1949 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-27

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1?URSDA, OCTOBER 27, 1949

HE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIV

.'

Bridge Tournament Will Be
Feature of LeagueFormal

An added feature at the League.
Formal to be held from 9 p., to
midnight tomorrow in the ball-
room, is an hour bridge tourna-
ment in the Grand Rapids Room.
Mrs. Walter McLean, regular
bridge instructor at the League,
will run off the tournament which
is planned between 9:30 and 10:30
Michifish Club
Holds Tryouts
In Union Pool
Many coeds will find that they
can get -some added wear from
their bathing suits even at college,
if they can qualify for member-
ship in -the women's swimming
club, more commonly known as
"Michifish."
Tryouts will be held from 9
until 11 a.m. Saturday at the Un-
ion.
MEMBERS MUST BE able to
perform basic strokes well plus
certain simple stunts. Instruction
is provided to those who wish to
qualify from 9 until 10 a.m. every
Saturday morning in the Union
Pool.
A water ballet to be given at
the Union Open House is the
main project of the Michifishers
consisting . of group numbers,
trios and duets done to music
with costumes and a central
theme.
A duet from this ballet was per-
formed by Betty Richards and
Shirley Walrath at the recent all-
campus swimming meet.
Up until this year a telegraphic
meet has been held annually. The
members swim against each other
and the clock and the best times
are sent into a central office where
scores from colleges throughout
the United States are sent and
tabulated.
RESULTS ARE then returned to
the University. The club will vote
this fall as to whether they shall
enter the telegraphic meet again.'
Miss Gareis of the Women''s
Physical Education Department,
is again the club's advisor and
will provide instruction for
members.
Those women who were mem-
bers of Michifish last year and
who have not been to club meet-
ings this year, will have to tryout
again for membership.

p.m. A $5 prize will be awarded
to the winning couple.
* * *
TED SMWTH'S 14-piece band
wil loccupy the bandstand at the
annual coed-bid dance. Smith
came to campus as a freshman
architecture student last year and
organized his orchestra from a
group of musicians in the Michi-
gan marching band.
Among the events for which
Smith's band played last year
are Soph Cabaret, Frosh Week-
end and Mortarboard's Pay-Off
Dance.
Women will compete for the
two gift certificates offered by
local merchants to the residences
with the highest percentage of
attendance.
THE DORMITORY with the
greatest per cent of coeds attend-
ing will receive a $10 gift certi-
ficate at the Music Center, while
sororities and house groups of
over 20 women are eligible for the
$10 gift certificate at Robert's
Gift Shop.
Theme of the dance centers
around apples, with decorations
to set the atmosphere. Guests
will dance through an old-
fashioned apple orchard com-
reaching out for a large red
apple suspended over the band-
stand.
Mosher's winning Fortnite skit
"Heaven is to Michigan as Hell
is to Minnesota" will provide in-
termission entertainment. The
skit is a take-off on the departure
of Adam and Eve from the Garden
of Eden.
The entire second floor of the
League will be open, with free
apples and a television set, be-
side the bridge tournament.
Honorary Society
Discloses Election
Of New Officers
Alpha Lambda Delta, freshman
women's honor society, has an-
nounced the election of this year's
officers.
Occupying the president's chair
at meetings will be Martha Tom-
kins. Nancy Watkins will serve
as vice-president, Alice Huston
as secretary and Marguerite
Adams as treasurer.
Membership in the society is
based on an average of half "A's"
and half "B's" in either the first
semester or throughout the year.
New members will be announced
and initiated next spring.

-Daily-Carlyle Marshall
ENERGETIC APPLE PICKERS-Members of League Formal central committee get in the spirit
for tomorrow night's gala dance by personally picking the apples to be' used in the decorations.
The busy workers are from left to right: Renee Pregulman, Gail Foster, Marge Hehn and Betty
Swanson with Mary Lou Asplin in the tree. Dancers will find apples on the tables in the ballroom

Youth Hostels
To Bike Hike
For 45 Miles
This Saturday, the Ann Arbor1
Council of American Youth Hos-
tels plans to begin their 45 mile
bike hike to the Harmony Valley
Hostel.
The hostels will meet at 8:30
a.m. with a hearty lunch and a
well-oiled bicycle, able to stand
the trip. They plan to be in Har-
mony Valley for dinner.
An elaborate Halloween party
will be given that night, with the
Detroit hostels as hosts for the
Ann Arbor group. The Ann Arbor
Hostels will stay overnight as
guests of the Detroit branch and
will begin the trip home Sunday
morning.
Members of the group making
the trip are urged by the club
officers to dress warmly, but com-
fortably and to bring sheets,
blankets or sleeping bag and eat-
ing utensils, since these articles
may be scarce. They should also
bring their American Youth Hostel
pass.
Meal planning and cost of food
will be shared by" the leader and
members of the group.
There will be some cars driving
to Harmony Valley from Ann Ar-
bor for the Halloween party with
AYH and they will be coming back
that evening. Anyone wishing to
ride down with them may do so.
The AYH sponsors square
dances from 8 to 11 every Satur-
day at Jones School and also
plans such outdoor recreation as
skating and skiing in the winter
and swimming in the summer.
Recently elected officers of the
group are: Milton Borden, presi-
dent; John Gehring, vice presi-
dent; Mary Edwards, secretary
and F. Balafubramanian, treasur-
er.
Michigan Grads
Reunite in Manila
After Year Here
Last week in Manila several
Michigan graduate students held
a pleasant reunion, one of the
more distant University alumnae
groups.
Petronila Marasigan, a former
resident of Mosher Hall, Jovita
Natividad and Gloria Anonas who
lived in Stockwell Hall last year
have just arrived in Manila after
spending one year of graduate
study here at the University.
They were welcomed home by
Consuelo Tan and Esperanza
Siochi who had been enrolled at
the University during the past
two years and are now working in
Manila. They were resident of
Mosher Hall.

Dean of Women Helps
Coeds in Finding Jobs

r

C'

Women students who need part-
time jobs in order to finance a por-
tion of their education may apply
at the Office of the Dean of Wom-
en to have their employment re-
quests filled.
Because of the scarcity of avail-
able jobs, the office is concerned
chiefly with finding employment
for women who must work to fi-
nance their education, rather than
those who want to work for expe-
rience, according to Mary C.
Bromage, Associate Dean of Wom-
en.
THOSE WISHING experience,
she said, are advised to do volun-
teer work if they are unable to find
paid employment.
Last year, 365 requests for
jobs were filed at the Office of
the Dean of Women, Mrs. Brom-
age said.
During the same time, 198 re-
quests for part-time workers and
181 requests for baby-sitters were
received from would-be employ-
ers.
* * *
RESIDENCE HALLS, which
have a large number of openings
for waitresses, employed the gr(ut-
est number last year, Mrs. Brom-
age stated. The Library, Union
and Michigan League also offeredl
employment for many she said.
A relatively small number of

coeds found jobs in private homes.
Only 15 such jobs were available,
she said.
Women who had had secretarial
experience, she added, were re-
ferred to the University Personnel
Office for additional assistance.
H il lel To Give
Drag or Stag
Dogpatch Ball,
Hillel, in true Dogpatch style,
will hold a Sadie Hawkins dance
from 8:30 p.m. to midnight, Satur-
day, Oct. 28 at the Foundation.
Party-goers will don their best
blue jeans and shirts in prepara-
tion for an evening of square
dancing in Hillel's straw strewn
"barn."
Between dances guests will
munch on apples and doughnuts
and sip cider served by the social
committee.
A square dance caller will be im-
ported from Skunk Hollow for the
evening. Large cartoons of Li'l
Abner, Daisy Mae and other Dog-
patch notables will decorate the
walls of the barn.

and also out in the lobby.

Group Leader
PetitionsC Due
By Monday
Because of the insufficient
number of petitions turned in for
orientation group leaders, Pat
Reed, interviewing council chair-
man, requests that more people pe-
tition for the position.
Petitions for fall orientation
group leaders are due at 5 p.m.
Monday in the Undergraduate
Office of the League. All womenI
students who are eligible may pe-
tition.
INTERESTED COEDS may
come to the Undergraduate Office
from 2 to 5 p.m. tomorrow through
Monday for advice on writing pe-
titions. Old petitions for the po-
sitions will be available as exam-
ples to guide newcomers.
Interviews for the positions
will continue to be held until
Nov. 4. When handing in peti-
tions the interviewee should sign
for an interview on the appoint-
ment list posted on the office
bulletin board.
Former leaders will receive post
cards inviting them to continue
their jobs for the February term
or for next fall.
GROUP LEADERS, who guide
freshmen and transfer students
through registration week, must
return a week before the official
term begins and will be able to
register early in the week.

Nation's First Woman Athlete
Turns Professional in Chicago

CHICAGO - (A') - Mildred
(Babe) Didrikson Zaharias, gen-
erally regarded as the nation's No.
1 woman athlete, yesterday signed
to become a full time professional
at the Sky Crest Country Club.
She is the first of her sex to hold
down such a job with full author-
ity.
Skycrest is a swank suburban
club northwest of Chicago. It was
the scene of the 1948 Western
Women's Open in which Patty
Berg defeated the Babe in 37 holes.
GENE DYER, president of Sky
Crest, said the Babe would take
over her new duties February 1.
She won't be just another tourna-
ment player, using her club as her
address as she did when she regis-
tered from Grossinger's in Fern-
dale, N.Y. Dyer emphasized that
she will have full charge of all pro-
fessional duties including running"
of the pro shop, and giving les-
sons.
To aid the Babe in reaching
tournaments and still give her
maximum time for her duties,
Dyer said the club would pur-
chase a plane to facilitate her
travels.
"And they are going to teach
me to fly it, too," Babe added.
"EXHIBITIONS next year?
Maybe a few here, and there, but
nothing like those last couple
years. This job at Sky Crest will
give me a chance to really tune up
for the big important tourna;-
ments."
Although she has not made

any choices yet, the Babe said
she was going to hire two men
assistants.
"One will help in teaching the
adults at the club, and the other
will concentrate on the kids and
run the pro shop when I'm not
there."
* * *
MRS. ZAHARIAS' golfing rec-
ord, on top of a sports career that
includes record performances in
running, swimming, throwing the
javelin, diving, high jumping,
hurdling, baseball, boxing, rifle
shooting, horseback riding, skiing
and billiards,. is one of the most
outstanding in the game.
League Formal
Any woman who did not turn
in the name of her residence
when she bought her League
Formal ticket, is requested to
do so and to bring her ticket
to the booth in the League to-
day, said Mary Ann Harris,
publicity chairman. This is for
the awarding of prizes at the
dance.

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Foxy Dressers
Take Notice!

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14.95 Rain or Shine Coats ... 19.95

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