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October 26, 1949 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1949.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tickets Are Still Available
For Coed-Bid League Formal

COLLEGE

MAIDENS

FRAMED:

Bespectaled Coeds View World Through Rose Colored Glasses

Tickets for the annual League
Fall Formal slated for Friday are
still on sale from 9 a.m. to noon
and 1 to 5 p.m. in the League Lob-
by and at the Student Activities
Window in the Administration
Bldg.
Ted Smith's orchestra will pro-
vide the music for the coed-bid
dance. Well-known on campus,
Smith's band played at a number
of popular dances last year.
* * *
ATTENDANCE PRIZES will be
awarded to the women's residences
with the highest percentage of at-
tendance. Dormitories will com-
pete foia $10 gift certificate at the
Music Center, while sororities and
house groups of over 20 women are
vieing for the $10 gift certificate
offered by Robert's Gift Shop.
"Apples,. apples. everywhere"
will be found throughout the
ballroom to carry out the glori-
fied apple orchard theme. Dan-
cers, entering the orchard be-
tween two large trees laden with
apples, will find themselves in
Dancing Club
Honors Quests
Honored guests of the Coed Folk
and Square Dancing Club today
will be members of Hinsdale
House, (East Quadrangle), Sigma
Chi, Collegiate Sorosis and the
O side of Stockwell.
Dancing will begin at 7:30 p.m.
in the WAB with some instruction
and mostly dancing.
Each Wednesday night there
will be different sorority, frater-
nity and dormitory guests invited.
Regular club members will at-
tend each week. New members are
always welcome, said Vivian Fraz-
ier, club manager. The dancing to-
night will continue until 9:30 p.m.,
after which the group will proba-
bly congregate around the coke
machine at the WAB.
Michigan Dames
The University of Michigan
Dames Bridge Group will meet
at 8 p.m. today in the Hussey
Room of the League.

old-fashioned pioneering Amer-
ica.
Johnny Appleseed himself will
be standing behind the band
reaching out for a large red ap-
ple. His famous history will be
caricatured on one wall, while the
fates of various individual apples
are to be pictured on the opposite
wall.
* * *
THE CENTRAL Committee will
don jeans and pick the apples
which will be found on tables and
out in the lobby. Guests may relax
on the couches and chairs ar-
ranged in conversational groups
and feast on the apples.
Intermission entertainment
will feature Mosher's winning
Fortnite skit. The dramatization
entitled "Heaven is to Michigan
as Hell is to Minnesota" is a
take-off on the departure of
Adam and Eve from the Garden
of Eden.

Television and bridge
available and the entire
floor of the League will be

will be
second
open.

PATRONS .INCLUDE Regent
Vera Baits, Dean and Mrs. Erich
Walter, Dean and Mrs. Walter
Rea, Prof. and Mrs. Arthur Brom-
age, Dean Elsie Fuller, Prof. and
Mrs. Barry Wheeler, Miss Ethel
McCormick, Miss Margaret Mor-
gan, Miss Muriel Effty and Miss
Leona Diekema.
The list continues with Mrs.
Margaret McCoy, Mrs. Martha
Strauss, Miss Helen Davis, Mrs.
Frederick Klein, Mrs. Sarah Healy,
Mrs. Katheryn Glass, Mrs. Bea-
trice Bisworth, and Miss Miriam
Brown.
Journalism Club
To Hold Party
An informal Halloween dance
for students in Journalism, spon-
sored by the Journalism Society,
will be held from 8 p.m.-to: mid-
night Friday in the ABC Room of
the League.
Decorations will carry oat the
Halloween theme, but no costumes.
will be worn. Refreshments are to
consist of cider and doughnuts.
Jeannie Johnson is chairman of
the social committee for the dance.

HILLBILLY SONGSTRESS -
Adele Hager, well-known cam-
pus entertainer will sing hill-
billy selections in a unique En-
gineering Show.
- * *
Engineers Plan
Smoker Today
An activities smoker for the va-
rious engineering organizations is
slated for 7:30 p.m. today in the
Union Ballroom.
Known as Engineering Nite the
event is open to engineering stu-
dents only. Booths designed to
acquaint those attending with the
functions of the organizations will
be set up by each of the groups.
Representatives from each club
will be available to answer ques-
tions.
A gala show with all-student en-
tertainment is being planned. Joe
Chestnut will be master of cere-
monies. Entertainers include: Bob
Leopold and his Dixieland Combo;
Beverly Olszynski, coed blues sing-
er and the Conwell Carrington
Quartet. These performers were
featured in the Gulantics Review
presented last year.
Other stars will be: Adele Hager,
who will sing hillbilly songs; Joe
Michaels, novelty pianist; and
Sarah Thrush, who will sing se-
lections for the light classics.
There will be no admission
charge.

By MARYLIN KLAFER
Many's the modern bespectacled
woman who would take issue with
Dorothy Parker's famous words toI
the effect that "men seldom make
passes at girls who wear glasses."
Years back women who had
imperfect eyesight were faced with
quite a problem. Either they chose
to see, peering out at the world
through heavy, unattractive spec-
tacles and fulfilling Miss Parker's
prophecy, or they rebelled and
risked an endless unseen, oncom-
ing hazards, including speeding
vehicles and insulted friends.
*. * *
TIMES AND spectacles have
changed. Nowadays manufactur-
ers of eyeglasses for the fair sex
have gone all out to produce
frames which will not only be
comfortable to wear, but will be as
pretty and flattering as any fash-
ion accessory.
It is no longer uncommon for
women with perfectly normal
vision to make frequent visits
to their eyedoctors in the vain
prospect of legally receiving a
prescription some day. Impa-
tient souls often dispense with
the costly visits andinvest in
frames of their choice which
they have filled with window
glass.
One large eyeglass firm now spe-
cializes in glasses 'with "cosmetic
design." The styling of the frames
Villagers Slate
Hallowe'en Party
Willow Village Wives' Club will
hold the first in a series of month-
ly mixers from 8 to 11:30 p.m. Sat-
urday.
Although the party will center
on a Halloween theme, costumes
are optional. Dancing, bridge and
other games will be featured. The
public is invited to the event which
will be free of charge.

is made to point up a woman's

lovelier features and minimize
those which are not as lovely. In
other words, the glasses are sup-
posed to "do for your nose what
lipstick does for your lips."
MANY NEW AND unusual ma-
terials are being used in the con-
structicn and adornment of the
most recent frame styles. Still, the
old standbys, horn rims, are as
prevalent as ever for school and
every day wear practically having
replaced the once-common neu-
tral and flesh-colored plastic rims.
Gay plaids and checked
frames are becoming more popu-
lar for the classroom. They pro-
vide a bright accent for sweater
and skirt combinations and a
wise investment for those who
can afford one pair of "imprac-
tical" glasses.
Many kinds of metals are being
featured widely in current frame
designs. A new feather-light metal
has been introduced which makes
glasses a light load for the tiniest

of noses. Frames in the metal col-
lections offer durability and are
found in muted pastel and russet
shades. Some of the frames have
a trim, gold or silver, on the nose
bridge and the temples (earpieces).
Others are untrimmed.
PLAIN GOLD and silver rims
are back, but in styles far more
appealing than those of grandma's
day. Some opticians are featuring
glass styles which do hark back
to the old days, though, but they
may be worn to advantage by very
few women. Flawless features and
just the right hairdo are absolute
prerequisites for those who intend
to select such conversation pieces
to correct their faulty vision.
Clear lucite frames containing
a surprising variety of bright,
colorful inserts are now on the
market. The glasses are partial-
ly hand done since the strands
of material or metal are inserted
by hand throughout the frame.
Lace, gold, silver and straw are
only a few of the ornamenta-

mm

tions being used. These frames
are particularly smart for dress
wear.
Wearing glasses is no longer
considered detrimental to a wom-
an's looks now that manufacturers
create eye wear which is not only
therapeutic, but cosmetic in de-
sign. Current thought regarding
glasses is aptly phrased in a prom-
inent eyeglass firm's advice to its
patrons, "You look through your
glasses; the rest of the world looks
at them."
Bridge Tourney
The Union bridge tournament
will be held at 7:30 p.m. today
in the Terrace Room of the
Union.
A regular game will be played.

IZFA Plans
Open Meeting
The Intercollegiate Zionist Fed-
eration of America (IZFA) will
hold its second meeting of the se-
mester at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at
the Hillel Foundation.
The organization has extended
an invitation to the general public
as well as to members. The pro-
gram will be centered about pres-
ent day life in Israel.
The evening will start with the
singing of Hebrew songs which
will be followed by a report by Al
Schuman on pertinent news items
from Israel.
Special attraction of the evening
will be the showing of the film
"Homecoming 1949." The movie
will present an up-to-date survey
of the national and international
problems which Israel is facing
with emphasis on the recent elec-
tions, immigration and housing.

-S A

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a full schedule of sports-minded activities.

i, .a

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 1)
247 Arch. Bldg., 4:15 p.m. New
students urged to attend.
Women of the University Facul-
ty: Tea, 4 to 6 p.m., 4th floor club-
room, League.
Delta Sigma Pi: Business meet-
ing at chapter house, 7:30 p.m.
U. of M. Theatre Guild: General
meeting, 7 p.m., Rm. 2K, Union.
Scabbard and Blade: Meeting,
7:30 p.m., North Hall.
Coming Events
Deutscher V e r e in: Meeting,
Thurs., 7:30 p.m., Union. Slides
and talk by Prof. J. F. L. Raschen:
"To the Goethe Bicentennial and
Beyond." Refreshments.
Druids: Meet Thurs., 10 p.m.,
Union.
Hillel Social Committee: Open
meeting, 4:15 p.m., Thurs., Oct.
27. Rm. 3D, Union. Final plans
for Saturday's Barn Dance. All are
welcome.
Graduate Student Council: Meet
Thurs., Oct. 27; 7:30 p.m., Rack-
ham Building. Election of officers.
English Graduate Journal Club:
Thurs., Oct. 27, 8 p.m., West Con-
ference Room, Rackham Building.
Topic: John Paterson's The Pri-
vate Eye: An Examination of Some
Detective Fiction." Visitors invit-
ed. Refreshments.
Society of Automotive Engineers
presents Harry E. Chesebrough,
chief engineer, Dodge division,
Chrysler Corporation, Thurs., Oct.
27, Union. Election of officers.
Refreshments. Membership appli-
cants accepted at this meeting.
Visitors' Night, Department of
Astronomy: Fri., Oct. 28, 7:45 p.m.,
Angell Hall. Dr. Hazel M. Losh
will give a short talk, "The Eve-
ning Sky of October 28," at 7:45
p.m., 3017 Angell Hall. Following
the talk the student observatory,
fifth floor, Angell Hall, will be
open forrobservations with the
telescopes provided the sky is clear.

Children must be accompanied by
adults.
Political Science Round Table:
7:30 p.m., Oct. 27, Assembly Hall,
Rackham Building.
ULLR Ski Club: Meeting, 7:30
p.m., Thurs., Union, for those in-
terested in a get-together this
weekend.
International Center Weekly
Tea: 4:30-6 p.m., Thurs., Oct. 27,
for all Foreign students and
American friends.
I.Z.F.A.: General meeting, Hil-
lel, 7:30 p.m., Thurs., Oct. 27. Film:
"Homecoming 1949" on Israel.
Refreshments. Everyone welcome.

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