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October 25, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

r A

Notre

Dame

Retains Lead in AP

Poll

HARRY GOT INTO THE ACT:
Little Fanfare Attends

l

'M' Soars to Sixth Place;
Sooners Take Over 3rd

NEW YORK-(IP)-Idle Notre
Dame still rules the roost as the
Nation's No. 1 football team ac-
cording to 84 per cent of the voters
in the fourth weekly Associated
Press Poll.
. Despite an open date in the Irish
schedule, 120 of the 143 sports
writers and broadcasters partici-
pating in the balloting put Notre
Dame on top for the third straight
week. A week ago they received
146 of 179.
ARMY, ON A 63-6 romp over Co-
lumbia, strengthened its runnerup
position. The Cadets drew 12 first
place votes and a flock of seconds
and thirds for a point total of
1,218 as compared to Notre Dame's
leading 1,387.
Michigan regained prestige by
its victory over Minnesota. The
Wolverines fell out of the top 10
for the first time in several years
last week but now they're back
in sixth position.
Oklahoma, another of the seven
major .unbea'ten, untied clubs in
the top 10, moved up a peg to third
on a 48-0 rout of Nebraska. Ten
experts who apparently noted that
the Sooners yielded only a net
gain of four yards to Nebraska's
ground attack, rated them first.
They piled up 1,143 points, only 75
behind Army.
* * *
THE OTHER FIRST place bal-
lot went to Michigan State which
finished in 12th position.
The wave of upsets had a tell-
ing effect on the rankings. Min-
nesota tumbled from third to
seventh after dorpping from the
unbeaten ranks on a 14-7 loss to
Michigan.
North Carolina's first setback, to
Louisians State 13-7, dumped the
Tar Heels 'from sixth to 13th. Ken-
tucky, tripped by Southern Meth-
odist, 20-7, fell from seventh to
14th. Pittsburgh's surprising loss
to Indiana, 48-14, dropped the
Panthers right out of the rank-
ings. Nobody voted for Pitt which
was 16th a week ago. Northwest-
ern suffered the same fate after
bowing to Iowa.
California picked up added sup-
port on its 21-7 win over Washing-

ton and took fourth place with
919 points.
The total vote with points fig-
ured on a 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1
basis (first place votes in paren-
theses) :
1. Notre Dame (120) 1,387
2. Army (12) 1,218
3. Oklahoma (10) 1,143
4. California 919
5. Rice 468
6. MICHIGAN 451
7. Minnesota423
8. Cornell 357
9. Pennsylvania 284
10. Baylor 261
The Second Ten - 11 Southern
Methodist, 148; 12, Michigan State
(1) 130; 13, North Carolina, .114;
14, Kentucky, 83; 15, Southern
California, 75; 16, Mirrouri, 52; 17,
Louisiana State, 41; 18, Ohio
State, 39; 19, Texas 31; 20, UCLA
26.
Others receiving votes: Boston
University, 23; Iowa, 19, Virginia,
13; Fordham, 10; Tulane, 7; Santa
Clara, Duke and Illinois, 6 each;
Maryland, 5; Princeton 4; V
Tulane, Irish
End Relations
NEW ORLEANS - ()P) - Tu-
lane University will break off foot-
ball relations with Notre Dame
after the 1950 game, the University
reported here yesterday.
Horace Renegar, Director of
Public Relations at Tulane, said,
"Schedule consideration precludes
continuing the Tulane-Notre
Dame football series beyond the
present contract of 1950."
* * *
NOTRE DAME will play Tulane
in New Orleans on Oct. 14,' 1950 as
the final game under the existing
contract.
Notre Dame handed Tulane a
46-7 defeat this year at South
Bend; Ind., to topple Tulane
from the unbeaten ranks.
The teams played a four-game
series beginning in 1944, with No-
tre Dame making a clean sweep,
scoring 158 points to 12 for Tulane.

Pancho Vies
With Kramer
In Pro Debut
NEW YORK-(/P)-Pancho Gon-
zales, the young California-born
Mexican who skyrocketed to fame
on the amateur tennis courts of
the world, begins cashing in to-
night when he makes his profes-
sional debut against Jack Kramer,
currently rated as the game's best.
Their match, carded forthree
out of five sets, is to feature the
opening program of a professional
tour that will carry them to. at
least 90 cities.
IT WILL BE played on a green
canvas court stretched tightly
across the floor of Madison Square
Garden, where Kramer also start-
ed earning an annual income in
six digit figures less than two years
ago.
Last event of the evening will
be a doubles match with Kramer
and Parker teaming up against
Gonzales and Segura.
The promoter of the tour is
Bobby Riggs, who ruled the pro
ranks himself until Kramer beat
Bobby so many times he chased
Riggs right into the front office.

'

* * *

(..

By TED PAPES
It's amazing how a football
player of the calibre of Harry Allis
could slip into the Michigan grid-
iron scene as unobtrusively as he
did.
In the early autumn of last year,
it was a little known rookie end
who found himself working out in
company with the Rifenburgs and
the McNeills at Ferry Field. Just
about the most important thing
Allis was being called upon to do
at the time was to practice kick-
ing from placement, an art which
he had picked up in his junior
year at Flint Northern High.
WHEN COACH Ben Oosterbaan
unveiled his champions-to-be in
the opener against Michigan State,
Allis put in a grand total of ten
seconds of playing time-he kick-
ed off. But one week later some
minor changes were made.
Tom Peterson had been en-
trusted with the extra point
chores up until the Oregon game.
On that occasion Oosterbaan
elected to try out his youngster
under fire. Allis responded with
two successful conversions in
Michigan's 14-0 conquest of the
Webfeet and from that day on
he became the successor to Auto-
matic Jim Brieske of 1947 fame.
But still Harry was just a place-
kicker, and he wanted a chance to
get in there and play some foot-
ball. He had to ride along thru

ding sophomore, Chuck Ortmann.
Allis had caught on to stay.
Gathering momentum on the
next weekend against Illinois,
Harry was a big factor in turn-
ing back the inspired Illini and
keeping the Wolverine slate
clean. He scored the clinching
touchdown on a 45 yard aerial
from Ortmann and nailed up the
losers' coffin with four conver-
sions.
He reached his peak in the sea-
son finale against Ohio State.
With five minutes left in the half
and Michigan trailing, 3-0, he
snagged a long pass on the 18
and scampered nome with the
game that the modest boy from
game that th emodest boy from
Flint owned up to his greatest
football thrill.
AND IT WASN'T his individual
performance he was referring to,
but the great team victory of
bringing Michigan home unde-
feated and in front of the na-
tion's college elevens. That's the
way it is with Wolverine ball
players.
Allis is continuing up the-
football ladder this year, now
on his own, because Oosterbaan
has no All-American ends to
fall back on.
Taking everything into consId-
eration, it's funny how a guy can
move up so quickly and yet so
quietly, isn't it?

Alhis

Rise to Stardom

-Daily-Alex Lmanian
SEE YOU LATER-Here's Chuck Ortmann after one of his many
successful crashes through the Gopher forward wall in Saturday's
great revival of Michigan football. In the speedy halfback's wake
are three determined Wolverine teammates and a prostrate set
of Minnesota linemen.

HARRY ALLIS
... alive and kicking
the clashes with Purdue and
Northwestern. His accurate toe
added four one-pointers against
each team, but his big break was
yet to come.
IN THE BATTLE for the little
Brown Jug in the Northland, Har-
ry proved that his right leg wasn't
a bit tired, when he scored his
first collegiate touchdown on a
19 yard pass from another bud-

Here's Why Michigan Scored Major
Upset over Disillus ioned Minnesota

MINNEAPOLIS-(A')-If you'rei
still wondering what brought on
Michigan's 14-7 upset victory over
Minnesota's football team Satur-
day, it appeared that the intang-
ible thing called spirit, or will to
win, was the moving force.
For that you have the words of
athletic officials themselves. Min-
nesota's head coach Bernie Bier-
I.I

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

man of Minnesota, said after the
game:
* * *
"THEY (MICHIGAN) were up;
we were flat. We had enough op-
portunities to win four games.
Michigan just outfought and out-
hustled us."
The Wolverine Coach, Bennie
Oosterbaan, admitted he could-
n't put his finger on any one
thing, but that "We lacked a
spark at Northwestern; against
Minnesota we had it."
Fritz Crisler, Michigan's ath-
letic director, had thoughts along
the same line and added that "We
wouldhavenbeaten Army easily if
All independent men inter-
ested in forming an indepen-
dent six man volleyball team
should contact the I-M Office
by Wednesday, October 26.
These teams will start playing
next Monday, October 31, and
every Monday thereafter from
7 to 10 p.m.
-Bill Tomke

we had played as well against the
Cadets."
* *
SEVERAL REASONS were cited
for the difference in spirit. But
perhaps the most often mentioned
was the fact that Michigan had
lost to Army and Northwestern,
while Minnesota had defeated
Northwestern by two touchdowns
and then handed Ohio State a
drubbing.
Distinctively for
Michigan Men
* Crew Cuts
" Flat Tops
" Personality Hair Styles
- 9 Tonsorial Artists-
no waiting.
The Daseola Barbers
Liberty near State

Everybody ca-'n .win
In the BIG Annual
PHILIP MORRIS

FOOTBALL

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(Continued from Page 2)
Committee to End Discrimina-
tion
Congregational Disciples Guild
Cleveland Club
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Druids
Engineering Council
Evangelical & Reformed Stu-
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Christ of Latter Day Saints
Flying Club
Forestery Club
Ga lens
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club
Gilbert and Sullivan
Grace Bible Guild
Graduate Outing Club
Graduate Student Council
Hawaii Club
Hillel Foundation
Hindustan Association
Hostel Club
Indian Institute of Chemical"
Engineers
Industrial Relations Club
Institute of Aeronautical Sci-
ences
Inter Arts Union
Itercollegiate Zionist Fed. of
America
Intercooperative Council
Interfraternity Council
Interguild
International Relations Club
International Students Aseoci-
ation
Interracial Association
Ishpeming Club
Kappa Phi
Les Voyageurs
Lutheran Student Association
Marketing Club
Men's Glee Club
Men's Judiciary Council
Michigamua-Michigan Actua-
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Michigan Crib
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Michigan Gothic Film Society
Michigan Union Student Of-
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Midshipmen's Club
Modern Poetry Club
Newman Club
Orthodox Students Society
Panhellenic
Philippine-Michigan Club
Polonia Club
(Continued on Page 4)
FOOTBALL FACTS
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