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October 21, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

F1UIAY, OCTOBER 21, 1949

'7H J-ICIISA UALY

r... .., . . ., m..r.ww..... . n.....

Go hers ay

Trade Spoiler Role
NVisitors BringRuiner Name

Wolverines Minus Koceski
For Crucial Comeback Tilt

That Leo Koceski will definitely
not see service in Saturday's en-
counter with Minnnesota was the
sad news that reached the Mich-
igan coaching squad as they ran
the team through a light workout
yesterday.
it shouldn't
khappen to a
h'
Some people actually soak my
wool in chemicals to pre-shrink
it!:'My poor wool goes in soft
and luxurious and comes out
harsh as a wolf's heart. You're
left with socks that bag and sag.
It Doesn't
Happen to ByFord
-The Natural
Wool Hose

Dr. A. W. Coxon, team physician
reported after examining the in-
jured right halfback yesterday,
that the Canonsburg cannon was
likely to be out for a long time.
"It is unlikely he'll play for two
or three weeks," Doctor Coxon re-
ported.
* * *
THE OTHER Wolverine cas-
ualty center Bob Erban, was not
dressed for practice and it is un-
likely that he will see heavy ac-
tion in Saturday's encounter with
the power laden Minnesotans.
Yesterday's workouts featured
signal drills, dummy scrimmages
and kicking practice, as heavy
work was stopped for the week.
Bierman's charges will arrive in
Jackson today and remain there
overnight, going to Ann Arbor by
bus Saturday morning.

By BILL BRENTON
THE SPOILERS-This is the
unusual title applied to the Golden
Gophers of Minnesota each time
they meet Michigan's Wolverines.
Year after year it has been the
Riermen-men who have halted
Maize and Blue winning streaks,
deprived the Wolverines of Con-
ference and National champion-
ships or have discouraged the
club for the remainder of the
season.
* * *
ALL TOLD the Gophers single-
handedly have deprived Michigan
of four Big Ten championships,
snapped the Wolverines second
longest modern winning streak
and handed the Maize and Blue
three of their worst shellackings.
And all since 1930.
This season the shoe is on the
other foot. Power-laden Minne-
sota rolls into Ann Arbor to-
morrow boasting a four game
winning streak, leading the Big
Ten, making a strong bid for
the 1949 National champion-
ship and last, but far from least,
seeking a New Year's Day Rose
Bowl bid.
Opposing them is Michigan,
stripped of their long winning
streak and losers of two straight
contests, Bennie Oosterbaan's

charges are listed as a 7 to 13
point underdog. The seemingly
fangless Wolverines are in the
key spot to turn the tables on Lady
Luck and throw a monkey wrench
into Minnesota's high-flying am-
bitions.
WOLVERINE followers of 16
years back remember an underdog
Gopher eleven that stopped a 16-
game Maize and Blue winning
streak in 1933, the same year
the club won Big Ten and Na-
tional Championships only to be
tied by the pesky Northlanders.
Then in 1934, 1935 and 1939,
Biermen's charges really poured
it on. They racked Michigan
teams to the respective tunes of
34-0, 40-0 and 39-6.
Even recent fans can't forget
the Gopher jinx in Tom Harmon's
heydey. From 1938 through 1940,
Michigan lost four games and
three of them were to Minnesota.
* * *
IN '38, '39 and '41 the Maize
and Blue dropped one game to-
you guessed it-Minnesota, and
in each of those years the Gophers
copped the Conference crown.
Worse yet, in 1939, the Gophers
deprived Fritz Crisler's charges of
a league title tie with Ohio State's
Buckeyes.

LEO KOCESKI
... injury riddled

NOT EVEN BROWN:
1903 St udent Manager
Tells Tale of Brown Jug

By HUGH QUINN
For nearly half a century Mich-
igan's Wolverines and the Minne-
sota Gophers have mauled each
other on the football field for pos-
session of the famous Little Brown
Jug, and there's been a different
story every year of how the tradi-
tion began.
But the real story of the most
fought-over trophy in football was
made known recently by the one
man who should know-the man
who owned the jug.
* ', *
THOMAS B. ROBERTS, '04
,was the student manager of Mich-
igan's "Point-a-Minute" teams
under Fielding H. Yost, and as
such, was with the Michigan team
on Oct. 31, 1903, for the classic
game at Minneapolis.
When the Wolverines went to
Minnesota that weekend, they
had a 29-game winning streak
over two and one-half years.
Wolverine trainer Keene Fitz-
patrick knew the Gophers were out

to win that day, any way they
could. So he sent student manager
Roberts to buy a water jug for a
private, poison-free supply.
ROBERTS BOUGHT the jug
there in Minneapolis. The 30-cent
vessel held five gallons-not ex-
actly a "little" jug. And it wasn't
brown, either.
The game went scoreless the
first half, strictly a battle of
massive lines. Tackle Joe Mad-
dock scored a touchdown for
Michigan early in the second
half, and the conversion point
gave the Wolverines a six-point
advantage.
But that wasn't enough. Minne-
sota came back after the score
with its gigantic tgckle, Schact,
carrying the ball on every play un-
til they pushed across a score and
kicked the point to tie the game.
* * *
THERE WERE still two minutes
remaining, but the frantic Minne-
sota fans flooded the field, and
the game never was finished. And
the jug, no longer needed by Wol-
verines, was left on the bench by
manager Roberts.
The water jug was picked up
with the litter of the field the
following Monday by Oscar
Munson, Minnesota grounds-
keeper. He took it into the ath-
letic director, who gave it the
label, "Michigan jug, captured
by Oscar, October 31, 1903."
The two teams didn't meet fdr
three years after that bloody, ir.de-
cisive game. But in 1909, Minne-
sota wrote, "We have your jug;
come up and win it." And Michi-
gan did just that, by a score of
15-6.
The Gophers didn't see the jug
for ten years after that, until they
beat Michigan, 34-7, in 1919. And
it's been since 1942 now that the
Little Brown Jug has reposed in
its shrine in Ann Arbor.
And Tommy Roberts, at the
game tomorrow, will be waiting to
see Michigan retain the jug that
he ,left behind 46 years ago, be-
cause it was no longer wanted.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETINj

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of theUniversity.cNotices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the Office of the
Assistant to the President, Room 2552
Administration Building, by 3:00 p.m.
on the day preceding publication
(11:00 a.m. Saturdays).
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1949
VOL. LX, No. 23
Notices
To All Department Heads-Di-
rectories :/Will you please requis-
tion as many Directories as you
will need for your department.
Directories will be available for
distribution on October 27 and
will be delivered by Campus mail
on receipt of your requisition.
-Herbert G. Watkins
Forestry Assembly, auspices of
the School of Forestry and Con-
servation. "Forestry in Postwar
Europe" (illustrated). Russell
Watson, M.S.F. '17. 11 a.m., Fri.,
Oct. 21, Rackham Amphitheater.
All Forestry students are expected
to attend; all other students in-
vited.
Medical College Admission Test:
Sat., Oct. 22, Rackham Lecture
Hall. Candidates report at 8:45
a.m. for morning session; 1:45

p.m. for afternoon session. Can-
didates must be present for both
morning and afternoon sessions.
Student Identification Pictures
will be taken for the last time
Monday between 8:30 and 4:30,
515 (basement) Administration
Building. All students who have
not yet had "retakes" should re-
port.
Placement Registration: Today
is the LAST DAY for February,
June, and August 1950 graduates
to obtain registration material
without penalty at the Bureau of
Appointments, 3528 Administra-
tion Building. This notice applies
to people wishing to register in
either the General or the Teaching
Division.
No blanks will be given out
after this week until Monday, Nov.
7. There is no charge for registra-
tion AT THIS TIME. Beginning
Nov. 7 there will be a late regis-
tration fee of $1.00 payable to the
Cashier.
Bureau of Appointments has re-
ceived a call for a part-time teach-
er of homebound pupils, in this
area. For further information call
at the Bureau of Appointments.
(Continued on Page 4)

Byford
makes the fin-
est wool shrink-
resistant-naturally.
Their secret Midlands Process
uses no chemicals. That's why
these 6 x 3 rib knits hold their
shape and size in the wash.
Stay soft and absorbent-
naturally!
LOWER PRICES ON
ENGLISH HOSE
Elastic Top Anklets 1.35
Regular Length Hose 1.50
Same s'ze - same shape
after washing
Wilds
State St. on the Campus

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iiirti rrrrrrra.

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OVER 100 YEARS

AT M I C H I G A N

i

SALE
RAI NCOATS
These coats are suitable for inexpensive
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Nationally kniown brands

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find the VAN HEUSEN Van Britt
an ideal. dress-up style shirt
give yourself
plenty of spread
with wide-spread
Van Britt
Esquire started it and Van Heusen makes the
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and handsome new colors . .. $3.65 and $3.95.
Plus, of course, old Professor Van Heusen's
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Cravenetted cotton gabardine knee
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Weatherproofed tackle twill raglan
shoulder, button front, smart looking
swagger style coat. Was $21.50.
Zelan treated Element Cloth utility
type raincoat, the kind that will give
maximum protection and wear to the
ract cal minded man. Originally

995
495
495

.:' '
:, . _,

Sf $coast-to-coast test of hundreds of men and women
who smoked Camels - and only Camels - for 30
consecutive days, noted throat specialists, making
weekly examinations, reported
NOT ONE SINGLE CASE OF THROAT IRRITATIOW

RAIN HATS - ALL STYLES - JUST RECEIVED

iiI

11

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