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October 18, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Gloomy

Wolverines Gird for Gophers

WALLY WAS A FULLBACK:
WeberBegins23rd Coaching Season

* *

* # #

* * *

Strenuous Practice Sessions'
Aimed at Raisig 'M'AMorale

Benny Oosterbaan and a sad-
dened band of Wolverines find
themselves confronted with proba-
bly the two toughest foes any team
and coach could face in one week.
More than faced with the prob-
lem of figuring out a way to stop
the rampaging Minnesota Gophers
this Saturday, the Wolverines
must also recover mentally from
one of the most stunning and
heart-breaking defeats in many
a season.
IT WAS NOT ENTIRELY the
Northwestern team that beat
Michigan last Saturday in Evan-
ston, but more it was an indescrib-
able lack of spirit and hustle that
often spells the difference between
victory and defeat.

The Wildcats were fired up for
the game even after a bruising
battle with the Gophers the pre-
vious week, so a great deal of
credit must be given to Coach
Bob Voigts and his valiant
squad.
The Wolverines, on the other
hand, were not the alert and sharp
ball club that has typified Michi-
gan teams for so many years. In-
stead they continually missed tac-
kles, let pass receivers get by them,
and were victims of two long scor-
ing plays that told the whole story
of the Wildcat victory.
* * *
TO BOUNCE back against the
ponderous Gophers appears to be
a task almost too big to ask of any
team.
Minnesota once again boasts
of one of the best lines in the
country. Led by potential All-
Americans Leo Nomellini and
Clayton Tonnemaker, the Goph-
rs held Ohio State to a meager
48 yards on the ground last Sat-
urday.
Thus the Wolverines wili have to
sharpen up on their not too potent
aerial attack if they expect to top-
ple the Northmen. Last year they
accomplished a 27-14 victory in
just that fashion by piling up over
280 yards in the air and only 17 on
the ground.
But besides their terrific forward
wall the Gophers now have a pair
of backs in sophomore Dick Greg-
ory and Billy Bye that give them
that long sought offensive weapon
to go with their near inpregnable
defense.
Michigan undoubtedly will be
in the unfamiliar role of the un-
derdog but with all the tradition
and glory of the little Brown Jug
at stake the Wolverines can still
snap out of their apparent leth-
argy and make Saturday's contest
the "game of the year."

By JOE EPSTEIN
"Most great football players,"
says freshman coach Wally Weber,
"have tremendous natural talent;
we coaches can just hope to take
their speed, coordination and
spirit, and turn out a good fin-
ished product."
"We can only guide," he con-
tinues, "but we can't inject.
There's no way to put speed into
someone who lacks it or give cour-
age to a coward."
GOOD HIGH SCHOOL players
may develop into varsity stars.
This is not always the case, how-
ever, according to Weber. Bob
Westfall, a third string all-stater,
became an All-American at Mich-
igan. Forrest Evashevski, another
Wolverine great, played no high
school ball.
Most boys who turn out for his
teams after earning high school
fame find that the going is
tougher than they had imagined.
"Stars," Wally maintains, "are
merely boys whose home town
papers build them up.,
But, he does find a direct corre-
lation between good freshman
squad showings and varsity suc-
cess. Of his best ten frosh each
year, at least five earn varsity
"M's" early in their playing ca-
reers.
* * *
THIS YEAR'S freshman team,
which he terms as "promising,"
hails from all over the United
States. Weber attributes this to
the fact that the University draws
about half of its students from
out-of-state.
Although the freshman squad
plays no games, Weber terms its

-Daily-Alex Lmanian
TOUCHDOWN . . . Dick "Killer" Kempthorn smashes over into paydirt for Michigan's second
touch-down of the afternoon in last Saturday's game at Northwestern. Making the tackle for the
Wildcats are Don MacRae (66), tackle, and Tom Worthington, halfback. Coming up to aid his
teammate is Chuck Potter (55) Northwestern center. Wolverine in the background is end Harry
Allis. It was on this touchdown that Michigan missed the extra point giving the Wildcats the one
point margin which they needed to win the game, 21-20.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN Michrgan

# .

I

(Continued from Page 2)

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Stud~er

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TOMORROW

be obtained at the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3528 Admin. Bldg.
Eligibility cards may be secured
AFTERNOONS ONLY, between 1-
5 p.m., in the Office of Student
Affairs, Rm. 1020, Admin Bldg.
Students must bring their tran-
scripts.
Constitutions for student or-
ganizations: At its meeting on
May 3, 1949 the Committee on
Student Affairs adopted the fol-
lowing motion: "Every student or-
ganization recognized by the Com-
mittee on Student Affairs shall file
in the Office of Student Affairs a
copy of its constitution. Docu-
ments are due in the Office of
Student Affairs, 1020 Admin., on
or befove NOVEMBER 1. This
regulation applies to graduate
and undergraduate organization,
including fraternities and sorori-
ties.
University Community Center,
Willow Run Village.
Tues., Oct. 18, 8 p.m. Dance com-
mittee.
Wed., Oct. 19, 8 p.m. Bridge.
Badminton and gymnastics for
women. Ceramics. Wives' Club
Board. Wives' Club Skit Group.
Thurs., Oct. 20, 8 p.m. Choir.
Ceramics. Water-color and textile
painting.
Fri., Oct. 21, 8:30-10:30 p.m.
Church Fellowship party.
Lectures
University Lecture: "John Dewey,
Democratic. Philosopher." Hor-
ace M. Kallen, Professor of Phil-
osophy, New School of Social Re-
search, New York; auspices of the
School of Education and the De-
partment of Philosophy, Tues.,
Oct. 18., 4:15 p.m., Architecture
Auditorium.
Academic Notices
Geology 11: To those who re-
ceived "X" in Geology 11 last se-
mester: Final make-up examina-
tion, Oct. 21, 4 p.m., 2054 N.S.

Thurs., Oct. 20, 2308 Chemistry,
4:07 p.m. Dr. R. C. Taylor will dis-
cuss "Dielectric Absorption by
Electrolytes in Solvents of Low Di-
electric Constant."
Engineering Mechanics Semi-
nar: Mr. Alfred R. Bobrowsky will
discuss "X-ray Diffraction and
Stress Analysis" at the meeting,
Wed., Oct. 19, 4 p.m., 101 W. En-
gineering Bldg. Visitors welcome.
Bacteriology Seminar: Tues.,
Oct. 18, 10:30 a.m., 1520 E. Medi-
cal Bldg. Speaker: Dr. Malcolm H.
Soule; Subject: Brucellosis.
(Continued on Page 4)
Big Ten
Football
MINNEAPOLIS - (P) - Uni-
versity of Minnesota gridders be-
gan preparations for next "Brown
Jug" battle with Michigan yester-
day with a light, workout.
After an hou r on the field,
Coach Bernie Bierman took his
squad inside to study movies of the
27-0 victory overkOhio State last
Saturday.
Buster Mealey, regular right
end, was back in action for the
first time since he suffered a frac-!
tured cheekbone two weeks ago.
DO YOU KNOW: ... that Mich-
igan has completed but 11 of 44
passes in the last two games for a
total of 82 yards.

In Regatta
The University of Michigan Sail-
ing Club took first place in the
Mid-West Invitational Regatta
held on October 15 and 16 at
Whitmore Lake.
Ohio State was a close second.
Other participating schools, in
their order of finish, were Mich-
igan State, Illinois Tech, Wayne
and Northwestern.
JIM RUKIN and Renate Oppen-
heimer skippered the Michigan d.t.
dinghies. Christina Lawrence
served as Rukin's crew, while Don
McVittle sailed with Miss Oppen-
heimer.
Miss Oppenheimer, the first
girl to sail for Michigan in six
years, was high point skipper for
the entire regatta. She earned
56 out of a possible 63 points.
The Michigan crew, trailing
Ohio State 77-72 on Saturday,
pulled ahead early Sunday morn-
ing. The final score was Michigan
97, and Ohio State, 95.
* * *
RUKIN AND Miss Oppenheimer
managed to win 8 of the 18 starts;
Ohio State finished first in only 4.
The regatta was sponsored by
Michigan State College; however,
invitations were issued through the
Mid-West Sailing Collegiate Asso-
ciation: This coordinating body se-
lected six of the most outstanding
of its members to participate in
the Whitmore Lake affair.

r

FOOTBALL

es ,-

Wednesday,

Oct.

12

4-5
UNION TERRACE ROOM

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Physical Chemistry

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