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October 16, 1949 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-16

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7!

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1949

Japanese Equipment Exhibit

KEY LEADERS TO MEET:
Phoenix Project Drive Starts Saturday

4

1

'SUICIDE' HITS ANN ARBOR-The one-man Japanese submarine which plagued American war-
ships in the Pacific area highlights the current exhibit opposite the courthouse of captured Jap
equipment. Sponsored by the Navy Club, a non-profit welfare group, the exhibit is being toured
nationally. Featured also is the famous belt of 999 stitches, worn by Jap marines during the war.
Japanese Suicide Sub Shown Here

Would you like to see a one-nian
"Water Dragon?"
Or maybe a belt of a thousand
stitches would capture your fancy.
These odd articles form the nu-
cleus of an exhibit of captured
Japanese equipment, on display
from 9:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. today
and tomorrow on 4th Ave., opposite
the county courthouse.

CURRENTLY BEING toured na-
tionally by the Navy Club, a non-
profit welfare organization, II.e
exhibit features the 20-foot long
"suicide" submarine used so sx-
tensively by the Japanese in their
World War II naval campaigns.
Known in Japan as the Koryu,
or "Water Dragon," the one-man

with ROZ VIRSHUP

'1

A night at the radio doesn't
seem quite complete without one
or two juicy murders.
Crime via the airwaves is avail-
able in every shape and form from
the standard "who done it," to
the supernatural horror story.
* * *
SUPER SLEUTHS who acci-
dentally fall in on the scene of
the crime and solve it despite the
efforts of the entire police force
are a dime a dozen in radioland.
Gregory' Hood, Philo Vance, Mr.
and Mrs. North, the Falcon and
the Saint, to mention a few, per-
ennially murder time in their con-
quest of crime.
The private eye with the quick
Today's
Programs
MUSIC: 3 p.m. New York Phil-
harmonic Symphony Orches-
tra, Leopold Stokowski con-
ducting-WUOM.
4:30 p.m. Milton Cross Opera
Album-WHRV.
COMEDY: 6:30 p.m. Our Miss
Brooks with Eve Arden-WJR.
7 p.m. Jack Benny Show WJR.
7:30 p.m. Phil Harris - Alice
Faye Show-WWJ.
8:30 p.m. Red Skelton-WJR.
DRAMA: 2 p.m. NBC Theatre-
WWJ.
4 p.m. UN Drama Series; "The
Hard Core"-the story of un-
wanted DP's-WJR.

comeback, Sam Spade assisted
by his adoring secretary Effie,
manages to sail nonchalantly
through this corrupt and crimi-
nal world doing his bit for soci-
ety (and incidentally for his ra-
dio audience.)
Dashiel Hammitt's fast-paced
and consistently well written
script, augmented by Howard
Duff's casual but distinctive ad
libing, with just the right mood
music in the background combine
to make Sam Spade a well deserv-
ed favorite.
*' * *
ON THE OTHER side of the led-
ger we have the Saint, wasting
the talents of a fine actor, Vin-
cent Price, in a dull, hackneyed
script and an equally stale pre-
sentation.
Among the police file variety
of mystery stories "Dragnet"
(7:30 p.m. Saturday, WWJ)
stands forth as the best of its
kind.
A completely authentic flavor'
pervades this show. Its stories are
taken from the files of the Los
Angeles Police Department, and'
achieve dramatic impact through
authenticity in just about every
detail.
* * *
THE ACTUAL sounds of police'
department routine operations
were captured through tape re-
cordings of station houses. Dia-
logue, -sans the usual cliches is
realistic; the detectives are hu-
man beings, a relief from the us-
ual presentation of the flat-footed
bungling cop.

sub was geared to carry 1,800
pounds of high explosives. It was
the suicide pilot's job to ram his
craft into an American ship,
thereby joining his ancestors in
fulfillment of his mission.
The noted "belt of a thousand
stitches" worn by Jap marines is
among the prized items. Each of
the 999 stitches sewed on it rep-
resents a prayer for the warrior's
safety by his mother, wife or
sweetheart.
INCLUDED ALSO in the exhibit
are Jap navy flags, naval logging
equipment and various types of
artillery ranging fromibattle rifles
to anti-aircraft batteries.
Men with past service or now
serving in any branch of the navy
may sign the visitors' log at the
exhibit, a spokesman for the Navy
Club said.
There is no admission charge,
he said.
SRA Group
Will Convene
To morrow
The electorate ofo the Student
Religious Association will hold
their annual fall meeting at 7:30
p.m. tomorrow in Lane Hall.
It was previously stated in The
Daily that the meeting was to be
held Mon., Oct. 10.
The group represents the 20 re-
ligious groups on campus. Accord-
ing to the SRA constitution, it
consists of 350 students who have
completed one semester of "re-
sponsible service in one of the af-
filiated primary groups."
THE ELECTORATE will recom-
mend major program emphases
for the 1949-50 school year.
The Executive Council has ap-
pointed leaders for the six pro-
gram departments on a tentative
program: These departments in-
clude study and discussion, social
and recreational, public relations,
intercultural, relief and outstate.

First shots of a battle to raise
$6,500,000 for the Phoenix Pro-,
jects in special gifts will be fired
next Saturday at a meeting of the
project organization.
More than 400 key leaders in
the drive will meet at 10 a. m. in;
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater to
hear talks by President Alexander,
G. Ruthven, Dean Ralph Sawyer,
Varsity Debate
Squad Begins
INew Season
Varsity Debate Squad has begun
another season of demonstration
and intercollegiate debates.
Four Varsity debaters conducted
a demonstration debate yesterday
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre as
part of the speech department's
third annual high school debate
clinic.
* * *
IN THE FALL the squad's pro-
gram consists chiefly of public
service of that nature. Debaters
are sent to various high schools in
the stateto conduct demonstra-
tion debates and take part in
group discussions and sympo-
siums.
They also debate before club
meetings of such groups as
Kiwanis and Rotary. Last year
Varsity debaters spoke to more
than 10,000 people, according to
Ed Miller, speech department
director of forensics.
The squad has made radio and
television appearances and holds
a regular round table discussion
program on Monday nights over
WUOM.
THE intercollegiate debating
program begins after Christmas.
The Varsity Squad debates some
25 colleges and universities during
a season.
Contests are arranged with'
schools whose debate trips in-
clude the University on their
itinerary. Several topics are
suggested, from which the two
schools select one.
The national college debate
questionfor this year is the na-
tionalization of basic non-agricul-I
tural American industries. Inter-
collegiate teams also debate such
other topics as atomic energy
control, universal military train-
ing, and labor-management prob-
lems.
t

of the graduate school, Prof. 1
William Haber of the economics
department and Drive Chairman
Chester H. Lang.
* * *
A DRAMATIC SKIT emphasiz-
ing the University's role in nu-
clear research, presented by the
speech department, will open the
program.
Dean Sawyer, who was tech-
nical director for the Bikini
bomb tests, will describe the
work being done and being
planned in both physical and
biological sciences. Prof. Haber,
who was General Clay's techni-
cal advisor, wil speak on the so-
cial science side of the research
program.
Organization of campaign com-
mittees in local areas throughout
the country is now nearly com-

plete. Active solicitation for spe-
cial gifts will continue until the
fall of 1950, when the drive will
be concluded.
FUNDS RAISED will be used to
expand the current research pro-
jects into peacetime uses of atomic
energy. The social and economic
implications of atomic power are
to be studied also.
The University is departing
from its policy against fund
raising campaigns with the spe-
cial gifts drive for the project.
President Ruthven, who con-
siders the program "the most im-
portant undertaking in the history
of the University," said he is con-
vinced that it is more in the tra-
dition of America to seek private
support than to solicit govern-
ment aid.

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