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October 16, 1949 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-16

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1949

six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

Losing
Tigers Defeat Illini, 27-20;
Gloriosco Stars for Victors

~trea

Extended

to

Second

Stra ight

I
1
1

ine-Ups Dufek,Kepthorn Register
THIGAN Pos. NORTHW' Touchdowns for Wolverines
Clark Thomas - ---------
Johnson ...... LT........ Sawle (Continued from Page 1) lighted by Gasper Perricone's 30
Wistert Panter --- -__ lihe y apr ercoes3
H Furd2yard dash down to the maize and
Hess Ford they moved down to the Wildcats, blue 27.

Iowa Comes Spartans Roll Over Indians
From Rear In Intersectional Grid Battle
W7* " - - r n---

CHAMPAIGN - (P) -- Missouri
slammed 65 yards to a winning
touchdown in the final quarter
yesterday repulsing an Illinois
rally inspired by Dick Raklovits'
75-yard scoring dash and snatch-
ing a 27-20 intersectional football
victory.
Missouri's split-T formation ex-
ploded for two markers the first
eight minutes of the opening quar-
ter and another in the second.
THEN Bernie Krueger's wobbly
22-yard pass was snagged by
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Johnny Karras for a touchdown
to push Illinois' drive to a tie in
the third period. The Illini made
it 20-20 when Rakovits took Phil
Klein's punt and sprinted 75 yards
to score. Lou Levanti converted
twice.
Missouri's 65 yard push at the
start of the finale was set up on
Dick Braznell's 30-yard toss to
Gene Ackermann. Winfard Car-
ter eventually shot across from
the three and John Glorioso
added the point for the 27-20
tab.
Illinois twice threatened before
the fourth period was over. Russ
Steger's line-knifing and Krueger's
pitches escorted the Illini to the
15 where a 15-yard roughness in-
fraction stalled the thrust.
* * *
LATER KARRAS and Sam
Piazza drilled to the 30 and Krue-
ger hit Slip Kersulis for 15 more.
Krueger, who added 91 yards on
nine out of 18 tosses then elected
to pass on first down. It was in-
tercepted in the end zone by Glor-
ioso.

Jackson ......LG.,
Heneveld
Powers
Erban ........ CC..
Momsen
Farrer
McClelland ...RG.
Wolter
Atchison.....RT.
Wahl
Wisniewski ... RE..
Holloway

. . . .

Parsegian
Daniel
Nemeth
Wietecha
Petter
Price
Macrea
F. Day
Cernoch
Forman
Keddie
Baggott
Steeb
Burson

Ghindia ......Q.

Ortmann.....LI........ Miller
Teninga Alban
Lentz
Koceski ...... R H .... Tunniclif f
VanSummern Worthington
Athan
Kempthorn . .FB... Murakowski
Dufek Perricone
Peterson Sundheim
DO YOU KNOW . . . The
father of Michigan's 25-game
winning streak, Fritz Crisler,
saw his first football game at
Dyche Stadium when he was
a high school student.

41. Then Rudy Cernoch recovered
Chuck Ortmann's fumble to stop
the Wolverines first drive.
Four plays later, Northwest-
ern returned the favor, and
Dick Kempthorn fell on Gene
Miller's bobble on the maize and
blue 39. After an exchange of
punts the first quarter ended
with Michigan making its first
serious attempt to score.
The Wolverines moved the ball
down to Northwestern's 14, but
the Wildcats held and took over
on downs. Burson had to kick four
plays later, however, as Michigan
was stubborn about letting North-
western make any yardage.
HIS KICK went out on the 50
yard line and that's where the
Wolverines started their first
march to paydirt.
In ten plays,with Don Dufek
finally climaxing the drive by div-
ing over the Northwestern line for
the score, Michigan moved into
the lead.
The advantage was short
lived, however, when less than
four minutes later Burson's
deadly passing arm pitched the
ball to Tunnicliff who scored on
the spectacular 66 yard touch-
down play.
The first half ended with the
score tied at 7-7.
Michigan kicked off to start the
second quarter and Northwestern
took the ball on their own 27.
They looked like an inspired ball
club as they drove down to the
Wolverines 23 yard line, high-

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Outline covering any of your courses .. . note its meaty
compactnes ... its telling paragraphs ... its newspaper-
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*To Be Published in 14

* * *
THE Wolve ines put up a wall
here, though, and took possession
of the ball on the 23. They
couldn't move with the ball and
Koceski punted out of bounds on
the Northwestern 36.r
Perricone broke loose again,
on the first play from scrim-
mage, and was finally forced
out of bounds on Michigans 29.
Four plays later Burson again
hit the bullseye and Stonesifer
slid over the goal line for the
Wildcats' second score.;
Eddie Nemeth made good onl
his second attempt at conversion,
the score that put Northwestern]
out in front, never to be headed.
Michigan took over on North-
western's 49 after Burson was1
tackled behind the line attempt-
ing to punt.
IT TOOK the Wolverines only
nine plays this time to cross the
last yard stripe. Dick Kempthorn
blasted the ball over from the
four yard line to set up the play
of th'e day.
The teams lined up for the]
extra point and Allis stepped
back to try the conversion. The
ball sailed just to the right of
the goal posts to leave Mich-
igan trailing 14-13 with one
minute and 10 seconds left to
play in the third quarter.
Michigan was set back to its
own 12 when they were penalized
for clipping on a Northwestern
punt early in the fourth period.
On fourth and one Koceski got of
a high punt against a stiff wind.
Worthington took it, slid through
a host of Michigan players and
was in the clear at the Wolverines
30.
Nemeth split the uprights with
his third attempt of the day and
put Michigan eight points behind
with only 12 minutes playing time
remaining.
* * *
THE Wolverines started moving
up the field after taking North-
western's kickoff, but on the third
play of this series Ortmann in-
jured his left leg. He left the
game and didn't see action again
against the Wildcats.
The Michigan drive then bogged
down and Wally Teninga punted
into Northwestern's end zone.
With five minutes left to play
Michigan put the ball in play on
their own 29, after Burson had
punted out of bounds.
On an intended pass five plays
later Teninga couldn't find a re-
ceiver so he lugged the ball 32
yards to Northwestern's 26. Dufek
again powered the ball across, this
time from the two, after a pass to
end Bob Hollway and two runs by
Koceski had set up the score.
Allis made good on his attempt,
but Michigan trailed 21-20. As the
clock was rapidly running out,
Northwestern took Michigan's
kick off with less than two min-
utes to go and stalled till the final
gun went off.
* * *
NORTHWESTERN'S c oa c4,
Bob Voights, said that he thought
Michigan's team was as good as it
was last year, but his "kids just
played inspired football. They
wanted to win, and they did."
He went on to comment about
Michigan's game next week with
Minnesota. "They have an even
chance against the Gophers. They
have just as much of a chance of
winning as losing."
Bennie Oosterbaan, the Wolver-
ines' coach, stated that "two well-
executed plays beat us, the boys
played well."
There were no serious injuries
on either team. Ortmann's leg in-
jury turned out to be only minor
and he should be ready for next
week's game with the Gophers.

t ns 35-9
IOWA CITY - (P) - Outplayed
for better than a half by an un-
derdog Indiana team, Iowa went
on a fourth quarter scoring spree
to wallop tpe Hoosiers 35 to 9 in
a Big Ten Football game yester-
day.
Behind 7-9 at halftime, the
Hawkeyes sent a homecoming
crowd of 44,081 home happy by
scoring once in the third and three
times in the final period.
* * *
IT WAS THE reserves who got
a stalled Iowa machine rolling.
Quarterback Fred Ruck put the
Hawks back in front 14-9 with
passes of 35 and 42 yards to end
Jack Dittmer, the latter good for
a score near the end of the third
period.
All Iowa's final period scor-
ing was by reserves. Bob (Chug)
Wilson, playing his first colle-
giate game, galloped 32 yards
around his left end for Iowa's
last touchdown.
Don Riley had punched over
from the three early in the fourth
period after Iowa recovered an
Indiana fumble on the Hoosier 20.
Six minutes later reserve Jerry
Faske scored from the one-foot
marker after earlier runs of 17
and 13 yards.
Iowa's first score came on a
15-yard gallop by Bill Reichardt
around his right end with three
seconds left of the first quarter.
Foiled
Mich. N.U.
First Downs ........ 17 8
Net Yards Gained
Rushing .........215 159
Forward Passes
Attempted ........21 8
Forward Passes
Completed.........8 5
Yards Forward
Passing .......... 66 124
Forwards Intercepted
by ............... 0 0
Yards Gained Runback
Interceptions.......0 0
Punting Average .... 33.5 36.9
Total Yards All Kicks
Returned ........115 143
Opponent Fumbles
Recovered .........1 1
Yards Lost by
by Penalties ......30 20

EAST LANSING-(P)-Michigan
State rolled over William & Mary
42-13 in an intersectional football
fight witnessed by 32,655 fans here
yesterday.
The battle was tighter than the
score indicated, however, for the
Southern pass attack caused MSC
considerable trouble. William &
Mary also did not compare too
badly in the statistics, particularly
in the second half.
* * *
IT WAS THE second successive
Saturday that MSC has fought off
a Southern conference bid for
glory. Last week Michigan State
downed Maryland 14-7.
Lynn Chandnois, the lanky
right-half from Flint, Mich.,
was the offensive sparkplug of
the MSC backfield. Chandnois
carried for three of his team's
touchdowns. Quarterback Gene
Glick was the backbone of the
MSC passing attack until he
was taken out of the game by
another knock on the injured
knee that plagued him early
this season.
Left half Buddy Lex was the
big gun for William & Mary. Both
Southern touchdowns came from
his pass plays. The visitors sorely
missed the services of Jack Cloud,
unable to see duty because of an
old knee injury.
LEX COMPLETED 14 of his 27
pass tries for 222 yards as the
Michigan State pass defense was
very spotty.
The statistics showed tie score
was misleading as Michigan
State made 156 yards rushing
to 115 for William and Mary.
MSC made only 168 yards
through the air compared to 222
for William and Mary, all by
Lex.
Michigan State exploded with a
bang in the first quarter. A 34-
yard punt runback by Horace
Smith put MSC on the William
and Mary 26. Two plays later
Chandnois cut inside left end and
went all the way.
* * *
A 37-YARD GLICK PASS to
Bob Carey was good for the sec-
ond score, ending a Michigan
State drive from their own 43.
Horace Smith went over from the
two yard line for the third score
of the period after a William and
Mary fumble on their own 33 put
MSC in position.
In the first period the South-

erners were unable to get be-
yond their own 31.
William and Mary came to life
in the second period, driving 92
yards for a score. A Lex pass to
Vito Ragazzo, good for 26 yards
was the scoring play. Ragazzo, the
top William and Mary receiver,
caught seven for a 148 yard total.
Both teams scored in the third
frame. Michigan State went from
the William and Mary 34 in the
nine plays with Chandnois diving
over from the two foot line for the
marker. The Southern Indians
started on their own 20 for their
final score. A Lex-to-Ragazzo pass
ate up 49 yards of the distance.
Lex tossed one to George Heflin
for the final visitor score after
the drive reached the four yard
line.
Football
Results
Rice 41, S.M.U. 27.
Oregon 42, Colorado 14
Washington State 35, Idaho 13
Nevada 20, Wichita 7
Oregon State 63, Montana 14
Vanderbilt 24, Florida 17
Santa Clara 14, UCLA 0
California 16, Southern Cali-
fornia 10
Wooster 21, Denison 20 (CQ)
Baylor 28, Texas Tech 7
Texas 27, Arkansas 14
Texas Christian 28, Texas A & M
6
Georgie Tech 35, Auburn 21
George Washington 24, Virginia
Tech 14
Virginia 27, Washington & Lee
7
Tennessee 7, Alabama 7 (tie)
North Carolina 28, Wake Forest
14
Duke 14, North Carolina State
Pittsburgh 35, Miami (O.) 26
Penn 27, Columbia 7
Dartmouth 27, Colgate 13
Princeton 27, Brown 14
Cornell 48, Yale 14
Fordham 33, Scranton 13
Duquesne 40, Holy Cross 14
Penn State 22, Nebraska 7
Iowa State 25, Kansas State 21
Oklahoma A & M 28, Drake 0
Oklahoma 48, Kansas 26
Butler 47, Indiana State 14
Hanover 62, Rose Poly 0
Case 13, Ohio Wesleyan 9
Ohio University 7, Western Re-
serve 7 (tie)

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