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October 06, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IN-

XALXA j IVA

HenrichIs Circuit Clout Trips Bums in Sehies

pene:

* *

*

Wolverines Polish Aerial
Tactics for Army Game

Ninth Inning H ome Run
Gives Yanks 1-0_Victory
Reynolds Turns in Two Hit Performance

World Series anxieties swept
through the campus yesterday but
failed to affect the atmosphere
surrounding the Ferry Field prac-
tice fields where the Wolverine
football squad moved one step
closer to their Saturday date with
Army's Cadets.
Michigan coaches deviated from
the usual Wednesday afternoon
scrimmage routine, concentrating
instead on aerial tactics, both of-
fensive and defensive.
OBSERVERS FELT that the
Wolverine strategy board, in view
of last weekend's strenuous Cali-
fornia efforts, could not afford to
play the game before Saturday
k rolls around, especially on such a
balmy afternoon as yesterday.
1. The first order of the day was
a brush-up on defense against
Army's T formation passing at-
tack. Some attention. was also
given running plays which the
Black Knights of the Hudson
may employ in trying to snap
the Michigan gridiron victory
string.
After polishing his defensive air,
armor, Coach Ben Oosterbaan!
IM Scores
Delta Upsilon 20, Tau Delta Phi
0.
Beta Theta Pi 19, Alpha Sigma
Phi0.
Chi Psi 20, Acacia 0.
Alpha Tau Omega 6, Phi Kappa
Sigma 0.
Sigma Chi 7, Sigma Alpha Ep-
silon 6.
Sigma Alpha Mu 22, Delta Chi
0.
Kappa Sigma 34, Sigma Pi 0.
Sigma Phi Epsilon 7, Theta
Delta Chi 0.
Delta Sigma Phi 33, Phi Kappa
Tau 0.
Psi Upsilon 26, Alpha Sigma
Phi 0.
checked the ammunition he'll fire'
at the Cadets via the airways.
Chuck Ortmann and Walt Ten-
inga opened up a varied barrage
of passes in an hour-long throw-
ing drill with satisfactory results.
* * *
PROBABLY the main objective
of the exercise was to cure the
pass-juggling disease which
gripped Michigan ends in the
Stanford fray.
Captain Al Wistert was again

dressed but did not participate
in the workouts beyond lending
his support vocally. In a short
conversation with Oosterbaan,
Wistert, speaking of his pulled
ligament, reassured his coach
with. the report that Trainer
Jim Hunt had predicted he'd be
good as new on Friday.
"That's good enough for me,"
added Al.
The remainder of the squad con-
tinued in top shape and should be
ready for peak performance on
Saturday. Michigan will be seek-
ing to reinforce its rating as the
nation's finest college eleven.
FroshTeam
Shows Good
Passing Form
Accurate passing, offset in part
by weak line blocking and spotty
running, marked the halfway
point in the second week of frosh
football.,
In a dummy blocking practice
earlier in the afternoon, Weber's
linemen hit viciously and opened
big gaps for the runners, but it
was a different story when the
red-shirted defenders took over.
ON SEVERAL plays the defen-
sive guards rushed into the back-
field to hurry passers and knock
down interference after they had
sidestepped the men assigned to
block them.
And when the linemen did
open a gap, the ends missed the
linebackers or the runner failed
to find the hole.
The tackling was good with the
defenders hitting low and stop-
ping the backs dead. '
The passing however was ef-
fective. Although badly rushed,
passers faded and put the ball
right on the target for what would
have been long gains had not play
been halted at that point.
Weber alternated half backs fre-
quently in an attempt to find a
successful backfield combination.
Harry Stuldreher, a stocky quar-
terback from Madison, Wisconsin,
carried the brunt of the work at
that position.

To Better r

iewcombhJ

ON THE PULPIT - "Preacher"
Roe, attempting to even the se-
ries standings, will take the
mound for the Dodgers today.
Bum's Rush?

BROOKLYN AB
Reese, ss .......4
Jorgensen, 3b . . .3
Snider, of .......4
Robinson, 2b ... .4
Hermanski, If ...3
Furillo, rf ......
Hodges, lb .....2
Campanella, c ...2
Newcombe, p .. .3

R.
0
4
4
0
0
0
0
0
0

H.
1
1
0
0
0'
0
Q
Q
0

TOTALS ....28 0 2

o.
2
0
3
4
0
0
4
11
0
24
o.
1
9
9
1
0
2
4
1
0

A.
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
A.
2
0
O
3
2
1

NEW YORK
Rizzuto, ss ....
Henrich, lb
Berra, c..... .
DiMaggio, of ..
Lindell, if ....
Johnson, 3b ..
Mapes, rf .....
Coleman, 2b..
Reynolds, p
TOTALS ...

AB
...4
--4
... 3
. 3
..3
. 3
..3
. 3
...3

R.
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

H.
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
2

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-Tommy Henrich
is strictly poison to the Brooklyn
Dodgers.
Henrich, who homered in the
ninth inning yesterday to give the
New York Yankees a 1-0 victory
over the Dodgers in the first game
of the 1949 World Series, always
has been a pain to the Dodgers.
* * *
EXACTLY eight years ago yes-
terday, Oct. 5, 1941, Henrich
struck out in the ninth inning at
Brooklyn for what appearedto be
the f inal out of the game but
catcher Mickey Owen dropped the
ball and Henrich reached first
safely. The Yanks promptly teed
off and scored four runs to win.
The next day the Yanks beat
the Dodgers, 3-1, to take the
series, four games to one. One
of the Yank runs was a home
run by Henrich.
A home run by Henrich helped
the Yanks win the second game
of the 1947 series against the
Dodgers. Tommy led off the fifth
inning with a homer to give the
Yanks a 4-2 lead. The Yanks went
on to win, 10-3.
THE GAME was only the sec-
ond in World Series history won
by the score of 1 to 0 on a home
run. By coincidence, Manager
Casey Stengel of the Yanks
clouted the other bell-ringer to
win a tight one for the New York
Giants over the Yankees in the
1923 play-off. Witnesses of the
two titanic socks said they landed
at just about the same point in the
stadium.
Allie Reynolds, ace Yankee
control pitcher, turned in a two
hit mound performance to lead
his mates to victory in the
series opener. It was the ninth
1-0 shutout in series history.
This was a tough one for New-
combe to lose. The 235-pound, 25-'
year-old rookie, who won 17
games after reporting to Brook-
lyn late in May, had blinding
speed and a sharp curve that
tied the Yanks in. knots up to the
time Henrich took things in hand.
OF THE four hits off Newcombe
which preceded the big one, two
were by Reynolds himself. In the
third inning the pitcher lofted a
lazy fly to left which fellfor a
double because Gene Hermanskii

.29 1 5 27 8

in TightPitchingDuel
had posted himself far over
toward centerfield in the belief
that Reynolds couldn't pull the
ball to left.
Reynolds also punched a
single between third and short
to open the sixth, but for the
second time his mates were to-
tally incapable of advancing
him.
Johnny Lindell and Coleman
contributed the two other Yank
hits. Johnny thumped a change of
pace pitch cleanly into left for a
single with one down in the se-
ond inning, and died there as Billy
Johnson and Cliff Mapes swung
futilely at third strikes.
WHEN COLEMAN pushed a
double down the right field line
with one out in the eighth, the
Dodgers gathered around New-
combe and asked him how he felt.
The huge freshman wiped his
brow in serious concentration,
and replied by claiming Reynolds
as his 11th strikeout victim and
forcing little Phil Rizzuto to loft
to center.
And that was all that had
happened this hazy afternoon
until Henrich, one of the truly
fine players of the present era,
laced into Don's third throw in
the ninth. Newcombe insisted
his big mistake was a curve but,
if so, it was a very fast curve.
Manager Burt Shotton be-
moaned the fate which caused
Newcombe to come in with a fairly
low one, just to Henrich's liking,
instead of sticking it up around
his neck.
IF THAT one pitch had been
high instead of low we'd still be
out there yet," he moaned.
Henrich's wallop finally bore
out the experts' predictions that
the Yanks would tee off on
Brooklyn's young fast ballers,
but it was a long time coming.
The way Reynolds manhandled
the Dodger lineup made it simple
for Stengel to name Vic Raschi,
another righthanded contro
pitcher, as his starter in tomor-
row's second game.
FOR THE National Leaguers it
will be their veteran lefthander,
the skinny Elwin (Preacher) Roe,
who won 15 during the season and
turned in several telling victories
in crucial series down the stretch.
It was widely felt prior to the
start of the play-off that Roe
would give the Yanks more trou-
ble than Newcombe, but that
seems' unlikely at this point.
Three Yankees - Johnson,
Mapes, and Coleman - each
struck out twice in succession
against Newcombe's shots. In
three tries, the convalescent
DiMaggio whiffed once and
popped out to second base
twice.
Though they had several oppor-
tunities to run in the early inn-
ings, the Dodger speed boys took
no liberties with Berra's throw-
ing arm until Reese sped to sec-
ond in the eighth. Yogi's peg was
so high that Coleman had to leap
to pull it down.

Brooklyn ......000 000 000-0
New York .....000 000 001-1
E--Coleman. RBI--Henrich.
2B-Jorgensen, Reynolds, Cole-
man. HR-Henrich. SB--Reese.
S - Hodges. DP - Reynolds,
Coleman and Henrich.
Earned Runs - Brooklyn 0;
New York 1. Left-Brooklyn 6;
New York 4. BB-Off Reynolds
4 (Hermanski, Furillo, Cam-
panella, Jorgensen). SO-By
Reynolds 9 (Snider 3, New-
combe 2, Hermanski, Hodges,
Campanella, Jorgensen; New-
combe 11 (DiMaggio, Johnson
2, Coleman 2, Mapes 3, Berra,
Lindell, Reynolds. Winner -
Reynolds. Loser - Newcombe.

PERFECT TIMING - Tommy
Henrich blasted a ninth inning
home run to give the New York
Yankees a 1-0 victory over the
Brooklyn Dodgers yesterday in
the series opener.
Head Injuries
Take Italian
Boxer's Life
BUFFALO, N.Y.-(P)--The prize
ring career of Enrico Bertola end-
ed in tragedy yesterday.
The 27-year-old Italian boxer
died of a head injury suffered in
a bout last night with Lee Oma.
Death came at 1:20 p.m.
It was the world's eighth boxing
death on record this year.
District Attorney Gordon Steel
ordered an immediate investiga-
tion and told police to produce all
ring officials, handlers of the
fighters and officials of the spon-
soring organization, the Fairview
Athletic Club.
"I have ordered Oma detained
and held here until the matter is
resolved," said Steel.
It was understood, however, that
Oma would be permitted to re-
main in his hotel.
Oma's home town is Detroit, but
he now is fighting out of Newark,
N.J.
He could not be reached for
comment.
Steel said he also had ordered
an autopsy to determine the exact
cause of death.
Bertola, who took the Italian
Heavyweight Championship only
two years ago, suffered quite a
beating about the head in
dropping the 10-round decision to
Oma, but walked from the ring
under his own power. Neither
fighter was badly cut in the face.
Fifteen minutes later Bertola
complained to his handlers of feel-
ing sick to his stomach. A few
moments later he lapsed into a
state of unconsciousness from
which he never recovered.
Dr. Louis Hertz examined Ber-
tola on the spot and diagnosed
the attack as a cerebral concussion
and possible cerebral hemorrhage.
The fighter was rushed to Emer-
gency Hospital. He was on the op-
erating table nearly five hours as
doctors worked to relieve the pres-
sure of a blood clot on the brain.
Reports from the hospital, this
morning grew progressively worse.
Shortly after 11 a.m. he was re-
ported near death. By noon, hos-
pital officials described his con-
dition as "very low."

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

4..

Continued from Page 2
Chinese Students Club, Chi Psi,
Delta Sigma Delta, Delta Sigma
Pi, Delta Tau Delta, Delta Upsilon,
Kappa Nu, Lambda Chi Alpha,
Phi Alpha Kappa.
Phi Chi, Phi Delta Phi, Phi
M c i a ., Delta Theta, Phi Gamma Delta,
Phi Kappa Psi, Phi Kappa Sigma,
Phi Kappa Tau, Phi Rho Sigma,
Phi Sigma Delta, Phi Sigma
Kappa, Pi Lambda Phi, Psi
Omega, Sigma Alpha Epsilon,
Sigma Alpha Mu, Sigma Chi, Sig-
ma Nu, Theta Chi, Theta Delta
Chi, Theta Xi, Triangle, Trigon,
Young Progressives, Zeta Beta
Tau, Zeta Psi.
Sun., Oct. 9.
Zeta Beta Tau.
Men's Glee Club: First meet-
ing, Thurs., Oct. 6, 7:15 p.m., Rm.
Save Time and Money
On Washdays
at the
Longer leisure
Automatic washing machines
Useful time added to wash day
No waiting, if call for appointments
Dryers available
Relax while your washing is done
Only 25c a load
Makes clothes cleaner than ever
Air conditioned
Takes only one half hour

3G, Union. The following men
have been accepted for member-
ship during the year 1949-50:
First Tenors
Dale R. Dunnihoo, M. Harold
Patterson, Sam Houghtaling,
John C. Bay, Glenn Stuart, Dave
Williams, Jack Hachigian, Andrew
Pringle, Robert W. Haddock,
Philip Steding, C. Wayne Wright.
Second Tenors
Wood M. Geist, E. Roy Duff,
Jack K. Ehlers, Edward M. Purdo,
Thomas W. Williams, Stanford
Hartshorn, Marshall Franke, Ger-
ald Van Syoc, Pat Paterson, Ru-
dolph Rust, Jr., Alan Newman,
Robert M. Benson, Dave Ruetenik,
David M. Calahan, Bob Stauffer,
Lawrence E. Derr, Russell J. Van
Rynr, Roger E. DeMeritt.
Baritones
Foxworth, Donald, George F.
Qua, 'Tom Sparrow, George M.
Muelhauser, Pres Holmes, John
Van Eenenaam, Jim Shortt, Rob-
ert E. Morgan, Roy B. Wilson, Jr.,
Demar Helzer, Greider, K. R.,
McClew, Robert W., Robert C.
Mulford, Richard C. Frank, Don-

ald C. Smith, Robert A. Elson,
Charles W. Scurlock, Arthur
Snook.
Basses
William White, Robert Woz-
nicki, Dale W. Wright, John Os-
mundsen, Alvin R. Garchow, Don-
ald D. MacMullan, Andrew Karoly,
David Pease, Leonard Swanson,
Merle A. Nelson, William B. Red-
mon, William L. Kemp, Jr., D.
Donald Hoexter, Dick A. Enten-
mann, Donald Cleveland, Ara Ber-
verian, Donald Ross.
Lectures
Michigan Memorial -- Phoenix
Project Lecture: "Contributions of
Isotopic Studies to the Study of
Dynamic Metabolism." Dr. Har-
din B. Jones, Donner Laboratory,
University of California. 4:15 p.m.,
Thurs., Oct. 6, Rackham Amphi-
theater.
Academic Notices
The Seminar in Applied Mathe-
matics meets Thurs., Oct. 6, 4:15
p.m., Rm. 247 W. Eng. Bldg. Dr.
W. M. Kincaid continues his talk
on "Problems in Visual Percep-
tion" All interested are invited
to attend.
(Continued on Page 4)

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