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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 28, 1950 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-02-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-71

THE RICHM-I ' DxIt;v

-TUESDfAY, FEBUTARY 2, 95

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To Sponsor
Travel lan
A special program for students
interested in foreign travel-study
projects will be sponsored by the
combined National Student As-
sociation-Student Religious As-
sociation travel services at 8 p.m.,
Thursday, at Lane Hall.
The meeting will feature brief
talks by students who have travel-
ed abroad or who have studied at
foreign universities, according to
Lee Winneg, '50, co-chairman of
the travel bureau.
In addition, representatives of
the NSA work-study abroad pro-
jects, the Church Guild travel pro-
grams and the American Youth
Hostel trips will describe specific
phases of their programs.
* * *
FOLLOWING THE talks, niovies
and slides of summer work pro-
jects and European universities
will be shown.
Ranging from tours of all the
traditional European festivals to
seminars on higher education in
occupied Germany, the NSA
travel programs are open to all
students of American colleges
and universities. Applicants are
chosen on the basis of academic
interest, extra-curricular activi-
ties and language proficiency.
The American Youth Hostels
will sponsor 27 trips this summer,
featuring hiking and cycling tours
throughout Europe. Costs for the
programs run as low as $1.25 a
day.
Application blanks for all of the
travel projects will be available
at Thursday's meeting.
Neweast Change
The news show, broadcast from
the speech department's Angell
Hall studios, will now be heard
at 2 p.m. over station WHRV in-
stead of at 12:30 p.m. as present-
ed last semester.
The 15-minute program, pre-
pared and presented by students,
includes campus personalities, spe-
cial features and interviews, as
well as up-to-the-minute news.

HOPE OF AMERICA:
Schools Should Defend
Academic Freedom Hill

< I

By NANCY BYLAN
It is the schools that should gc
first to the defense of any studeni
or professor whose rights of aca-
demic freedom are attacked,athe
Rev. Charles A. Hill of Detroit de-
clared Sunday before the Democ-
racy in Education Conference.
"The hope of America is witl
her young people," he said. It is
not enough for students to just
hope and- wait for an ideal situa-
tion, he ' argued. "There must be
action and continued action until
something jells."
* * *
HE DEPLORED the hesitancy
of students to participate in ac-
tive measures against discrimina-
tion for fear of being expelled from
school. "He who sells his man-

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hood just to get a degree will be
a coward all his life," Mr. Hill
said.
"Freedom is everybody's busi-
ness; we can only protect our
own freedom by protecting that
of others," he concluded.
The Democracy in Education
Conference concluded with reports
from the three panels on discrim-
ination, academic freedom and
peace.
-* * *

CED's Goal
Wins Praise
By Notables
Letters from Mrs. Eleanor Roose-
velt and John Dewey highlight
correspondence recently received
by the Committee to End Discrim-
ination from prominent educators
and people in public affairs, com-
mending the group's work toward
the removal of discriminatory
questions from'application blanks.
Mrs. Roosevelt wrote: "I am
glad to know of the campaign
which the Committee to End Dis-
crimination . . . is conducting at
this time. I should like to com-
mend you for the work you are
doing to erase discrimination in
educational opportunities."
* * *
IN HIS LETTER John Dewey
declared: "As a former teacher at
the University of Michigan, and
as one having a high regard for
its traditional liberalism, I write
to say that it is with regret that
I note the questions officially put
to choose who would enter. Their
discriminatory purpose is only too
evident."
Statements declaring personal
support of the CED came from
Sen. Glen H. Taylor (D-Ida.)
and Rep. Vito Marcantonio
(APL-N.Y.).

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MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .50 1.02 1.68
3 .60 1.53 2.52
4 .80 2.04 4.80
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.

UES Offers
New Course
In Advertising
A new course in advertising lay-
out and typography, designed
strictly for the layman, will be
offered by the University Exten-
sion Service next week under Prof.
Donald Gooch of the architecture
college.
The course sprang from sug-
gestions offered by The Daily's
advertising staff.
* * *
FIRST SESSION of the course
will meet from 7-9 p.m. tomorrow
in the conference room at the Stu-
dent Publications Building. Suc-
ceeding classes will be held from
7-9 p.m. each Wednesday, in the
architecture building.
While this eight-week course
carries no credit, the extension
service will award a certificate
to those who complete it.
The $8 registration fee for the
course must be paid before the
class starts to Mrs. Fisher in the
extension service office, 4524 Ad-
ministration Bldg.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
of the University. Notices
f64 ulletin 'should be sent in
typewritten form to the Office of the
Assistant to the President, Room 2552
Administration Building, by 3:00 p.m.
en the day preceding publication
cil:00 a.m. Saturdays).

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1950
VOL. LX, No. 98
Notices
Regents' Meeting: 9 a.m., Sat.,
Mar. 18. Communications for con-
sideration at this meeting must be
in the President's hands not later
than Mar. 9.
Herbert G. Watkins,
Secretary

AMONG recommendations of
the discrimination panel were sug-
gestions that the Conference initi-
ate action on the Fair Employ-
ment Practices Commission at the
coming session of the state legis-
lature; that no athletic games be
scheduled with schools which prac-
tice discrimination on their teams.
A third was that the Michi-
gan Plan of refusing recognition
of groups having discriminatory
clauses in their constitutions be
put into effect on other campuses.
The panel on academic free-
dom urged action through such
means as forums, speaker's bur-
eaus, picketing, rallies, radio
broadcasts, handbills and letters
to the college newspapers.
The peace panel advocated that
a peace week of intensive activity
on peace be set up on the cam-
puses and that Gov. G. Mennen
Williams be asked to set aside a
state-wide peace week. Other sug-
gestions included correspondence
with Russian students, forums on
peace and peace reading rooms
and an essay on peace sponsored
by campus organizations.
Smith To Spe jk
Everett R. Smith, president of
the American Marketing Associa-
tion, will address an open meeting
of the Marketing Club at 7:30 p.m.
tomorrow, in Rm. 130 Business
Administration Building.
Smith will discuss "How Mar-
keting Research Serves Distribu-
tion."
Public Schools have openings for
elementary teachers in grades one
to six. Graduates in the upper
ten per cent of their class will be
given preference. To qualify for
a California certificate a candi-
date must have 24 hours of Edu-
cation, including eight semester
hours of practice teaching.
The Public Schools of Minne-
apolis, Minnesota are accepting
applications for positions in the
elementary schools. A representa-
tive will be here in March to inter-
view interested candidates.
The Cincinnati, Ohio Public
Schools have openings in the ele-
mentary and secondary schools,
in special education and counsel-
ing.
The Public Schools of the Dis-
trict of Columbia anhounce exam-
inations to obtain a list of eligi-
bles as librarians in the Public
Senior High Schools, to be held
April 10-11, 1950.
For further information con-
cerning the above positions con-
tact the Bureau of Appointments,
3528 Administration Bldg.
Camp Positions: North Star
Camp, (coed) Hiawatha National
Forest, Michigan, announces va-
cancies for waterfront direct'r.
(male), ARC Instructor able to
teach sailing and canoeing; also
for experienced general counselors
(Jewish, men and women). For
further information call at Bur-
eau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Bldg.
International Center, Weekly
Calendar:
Wed., Mar. 1, 10 a.m.' Ann Ar-
bor Sewing Group. 8 p.m., Danc-
ing Instruction; Canasta Instruc-
tion.
Thurs., Mar. 2, 7:30 p.m.,
Polonia Club.
Sat., Mar. 4, 1:30 p.m., Hindi
Classes. 3 p.m., Music Hour. 4 p.m.,
Movies on America.

vp--

LOST-Girl's gold bracelet. Call B-14,
Lawyers Club. )20L
LOST-'49 gold H.S. class ring. Has
rectangular greenstones. Initialed
E.J.R. Lost near Union about Wed.
415 Michigan Hse. )35
YP To Probe
Student Costs
The Young Progressives will un-
dertake a program on the econom-
ic condition of students on cam-
pus, Gordon MacDougall, president
of the YP's has announced.

LOST & FOUND

' FOR SALE
THREE TIRES-U.S. Royal 6.50-16. Ex-
cellent condition,'never punctured.
Call 5421,_Ann Arbor, evenings. )37
TAME YOUNG Parakeets, Canaries and
Love Birds. Bird supplies and cages.
Mrs. Ruffins, 562 S. 7th. )2B
COUSIN'S ON STATE ST.-During the
cool shortage try one of our cardigans
or slipover sweaters. Prices $4.95-$6.95.
)3
LEICA CAMERA-35 mm. summitar F1.2
lens. K. Walker, 7026, evenings. )36
MAKE TIME OR LIFE part of your
college life. Special reduced Student
Rates available ($4.75 a year-instead
of $6) to make it easier. Phone Stu-
dent Periodical Agency, 2-82-42. We'll
bill you. )2
MONEY SAVERS-Navy T-shirts, 45c.
Khaki pants, $2.99. All wool athletic
hose, 49c. Marlboro gabardine sport
shirts, $3.99. Navy type oxfords, $6.88.
Open 'til 6 p.m. SAMS STORE 122 E.
Washington St.)5
PERSONAL
TOBY'S FRIEND is near West Engineer-
ing Library. Who is Toby. )18P
CORSAGES
After she calls you for Assembly, call
CAMPUS CORSAGE for your flower.
Ph. 3-1824. )20T
ATTENTION FOOTBALL PLAYERS! -
Harvard pays highest prices. No edu-
cational background necessary. Bids
start at 40c per lb. FOB Cambridge,
Mass. Contact F. Watkins Freeman,
campus representative, Ph. 2-6671.
"FIGHT RICHLY, FAIR HAVAD."
)21P
HAS ANYONE SEEN my little chicka-
dee? Bill Fields. )22P
DEAR SIR-All that I want is my two
rabbits._Try the glove business.
HEY PETE-The daily 59c dinner spe-
cial at J. D. Miller's Cafeteria is a
real money saver. Believe it or not,
this includes entree, potato, vege-
table, salad or dessert (pie or cake),
bread, butter, beverage. Try it your-
self! Only 59c. Yours, Bill. )2P
NEWS FROM CLUB 211-Club 211's new
policy-there is no expiration date on
meal tickets! Tickets good any day-
need not be used on consecutive days.
Expiresonly when completely punch-
ed. ) 2P
DW PLAYING
. 11 - EVENINGS AT 8:30
D., SAT. MATS. 2:30
E SEASON"-N. Y. Times

o. r

PERSONAL
DEMAND is starting for SPRING coats,
suits, and children's garments. Get
yours in early.
NEARLY NEW SHOP
311 East Huron )8B
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
209 S. State
Phone 8161 )iP
MEN WANTED to eat at fraternity
house. Excellent food, moderate pric-
es. Close to campus. Call Bud Ph.
'1039. ') IOP

BUSINESS
SERVICES

STUDENT TYPING and job applica-
tions expertly done. Reasonable rates.
Will call for and deliver. Ph. 6341.
_ )21B
HAVE YOUR typewriter repaired by the
Office Equipment Service Company,
215 E. Liberty. )4
WASHING and, or, ironing done in my
own home. Free pick up and deliv-
ery.__Phone 2-9020. )1B
HILDEGARDE SHOPPE
109 E. Washington
Expert Alterations
Custom Clothes
by Established Tradition )3B
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
Ukeleles - $5.50
New and Used Instruments
209 E. Washington )4B
LEAVE JUNIOR with a reliable baby
sitter while you go out - anytime.
Kiddie Kare, 3-1121. ) 10B
TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales and Service
MORRILL'S-314 S. State St. )11B
PROMP SERVICE on all typewriter
repairs. MOSELEY TYPEWRITER &
SUPPLY CO., 214 E. Washington. )5B
ALTERATIONS-Ladies garments. 410
Observatory near Stockwell Hall.
Ph. 2-2678. )22B
GROUP PHOTOS
Weddings a Specialty
CHUCK NICHOLS
Ph. 8528 715 E. Huron )20B
SYLVIA STUDIO OF DANCE-Ballroom,
tap, acrobatic, ballcE. Over Michigan
Theater. Phone 8066. )9B
Try FOLLETT'S First
Every Book for Every Course
USED BOOKS
at
BARGAIN PRICES
F L LE T T S

CHOICE - FIRST FLOOR DOUBLE -
TWIN BEDS, NEVER BEFORE RENT-
ED, NEAR CAMPUS. 325 E. JEFFER-
SON. PH. 3-4738. )34R
ROOMS FOR BOYS-706 Oakland St.
_ ) 40R
FOR RENT - Single room in private
home near campus. Graduate or bus-
iness girl. Ph. 6866. )39R
DOUBLE AND SINGLE ROOM for males.
Reasonable. 943 Greenwood. Ph 6059.
) 36R
DOUBLE FURNISHED rooms and suites
-student or working man. Student
couples accommodated. No cooking.
Twin beds, shower, continuous hot
water, reasonable. Close to campus.
and Union. 509 S. Division near Jef-
ferson. )38R
SINGLE ROOM and % double 621
Church. Ph. 2-4639. )41R
ONE-HALF of large pleasant'room near
campus available for male student.
Also one small double. Call 6876. 8B
SINGLE ROOM for male students, 3%
blocks from campus. Hollywood beds,
shower. $6.50 per week. Ph. 5750. )19R
VACANCY ' for male students. Rooms
can be used as apartment. Also double
rooms. Call 2-2052. 8R
ATTRACTIVEsingle room. Cooking
privileges. 507 E. Liberty and 1106
Lincoln. Ph. 5224. )14R
HELP
WANTED
FOOTBALL PLAYERS-Talk to others,
then see us. We represent substantial
interests with unlimited funds. Are
authorized to top any offer. Principal
cannot be disclosed. Ross Feld &
Land, Agents, 1404 Yale Sta., New
Haven, Conn. )5H
k t

t

Low job wages, rent, high cost
Prof. Alfred McClung Lee of the of food and other financial prob-I
sociology and anthropology de- lems will be considered in a survey
partments of Brooklyn College that the group will take next week
wrote the CED: "If the University to determine the major economic
of Michigan is to maintain its difficulties the average student
status as a great American public faces.
university, it seems to me to be The subsequent program will be
mandatory that it eliminate all Taseengsporaheisur-
such discriminatory questions from based on the findings of the sur-
its admission blanks.." vey, MacDougall said. -
Personal letters were sent to The YP's will also work to get
Prof. Wayne L. Whitaker, secre- other campus groups interested in
tary of the Medical School by Al- the project, he added.
vin Johnson, president of the New
School for Social Research, New NC
York City, urging the removal NCASS
from the application blanks of THrU MR
"certain questions which might WED
conceivably lay the basis for dis- "FINEST COMEDY OF THE
crimination."

Wednesday'
Night At
9 P.M. Show!
HOLLYWOOD
SNEAK

A.

ON'

-J

t oSEY
r ^E"f

ROOMS
FOR RENT

Bureau of
The Long

Appointments:
Beach, California

University Community Center,
Willow Village
Tues., Feb. 28, 8 p.m., Wives'
Club. Program by wives from -other
lands. New members welcome.
Wed., Mar. 1, 8 p.m., Ceramics;
Wives' Club Board; Great Books
Group. Plutarch's Lives. New
members welcome; Christian Edu-
cation Committee. Study-iadd dis-
cussion of Ligon's "The Future
Is Now."
Thurs., Mar. 2, 8 p.m., Ceramics;
Choir.
Fri., Mar. 3, 8 p.m., Lenten Serv-
ice. (Interdenominational.)
Academic Notices
Preliminary Examinations for
the Ph.D. in English will be given
from 9 to 12 o'clock, 71 Business
Administration Building, as fol-
lows: Wed., Apr. 19, English Liter-
ature from the Beginnings to
1550; Sat., Apr. 22, English Litera-
ture from 1550 to 1750; Wed., Apr.
26, English Literature from 1750
to 1950; Sat., Apr. 29, American
Literature. Students who plan to
take these examinations must
notify Professor Ogden at once.
Engineering Mechanics Seminar:
4 p.m., Wed., Mar. 1, 101 W. Engi-
neering. Mr. Samuel K. Clark will
present Part II, "Reduction of the
Equilibrium Equations by Means
of Strain-Displacement Relations"
of his discussion of "Sh'ells of the
:Form of a Surface of Revolution."
All interested persons welcome.
History Make-ups: Sat., Mar. 4,
;-12 noon, Rm. C, Haven Hall.
(Continued on Page 3)

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LIBERAL TERMS -
LIBERAL TRADES
Royal Portable Dealers
115 W. Liberty St.

At
Ax

1204 South University
. serving
BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS and DINNERS
SANDWICHES and SALADS
. . . from . ..
7:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. and 5:00 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Closed Sundays
U I ff ,tN . N '
THE DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
with
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC PRESENT
OFMSCU
J~toa~t l

.t

SHORT ORDERS
and
Full Course Meals
TRIANGLE RESTAURANT
808 South State

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WM"Wd

4111,

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TODAY & WED.
Mat. 30c, Nights & Sun. 40c

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