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February 24, 1950 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-02-24

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TH iT~ TIUTTN TWK

'.4 , . -

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1950

vr '

ducational
ionference
Lo Be Held

Academic freedom, discrimina-
tion and peace will be the topics
under discussion at the Demo-
cracy in Education Conference, to
be held tomorrow and Sunday in
the Assembly Room of the Union.
Participating in the Conference
will be three hundred delegates
from Michigan State College,
Michigan State Normal, Wayne
University, Olivet, Hillsdale, Jack-
son Junior College, Flint Junior
College, Western Michigan Teach-
er's College, Port Huron Junior
College, and the University.
* * *
STUDENTS interested in at-
tending the Conference may regis-
ter today from 3 to 9 p.m. in the
League Lobby and from 5 to 9 p.m.
at the Union ticket desk.
Delivering the keynote ad-
dress will be the Rev. Albert
Kauffman of Bancroft, Mich.,
speaking on "The Battle for
Democracy Today and Educa-
tion" at 3 p.m. tomorrow in
the Union.
* * *
0. JOHN ROGGE, former Unit-
ed States Assistant Attorney-Gen-
eral under Roosevelt and attorney
for the Civil Rights Congress will
talk on "Relation of Civil Liber-
ties to Peace," at 8 p.m. tomorrow
in Kellogg Auditorium.
The Rev. Charles A. Hill of
Detroit wil speak on "Discrimi-
nation and Education". at 2:30
p.m. Sunday in the Union. Rev.
Hill, a member of the Progres-
sive Party, has done much work
toward improving Negro living
conditions in Detroit.
The Conference will also include
three panels on 1) methods of
removing discrimination from
campus life, 2) protecting and ex-
tending academic freedom and
3) achieving peaceful internation-
al relations,
'U' Organist's
Discs Released
Three groups of long-playing
records by Robert Noehren, Uni-
versity organist, playing the
Baroque organ in Buffalo, have
been released by a New York re-
cording company.
The first of these releases con-
sists of two 10-inch records de-
voted to five of the preludes and
fugues by Bach. The second, a
sinlged04ach recording, is a col-
lection of organ works from the
16th and 17th centuries. A 12-
inch record, featuring the organ
compositions of Dietrich Buxe-
hude, completes the list of offer-
bngs.
Union Arranges
Trip to 'Chaillot'
Stage enthusiasts will be able
to witness the popular Jean Girau-
doux comedy "Madwoman of
Chaillot" in Detroit March 11 with
transportation arranged by the
Michigan Union.
Tickets will go on sale at the
Union box-office from 3 to 5 p.m.
today and Monday. They are
priced at $3.50, which includes
both theatre admission and round
trip bus fare, according to Jim
Callison, of the Union executive
council.
Continuous from 1:30 P.M.
Phone 2-0128

NOW PLAYING!
at 3:05 - 6:40 .& 10:00
YOU'.t NEVER FORGH
DENNIS O'KEEFE
GAIL RUSSELL
' 'EIEASED TrU UNITED AiMS,

--Daily-Ed Kozma
SNOW JOB-Matt Harden, crew supervisor, braces himself in
his seat as his tractor and snow blade bite into a huge pile of
snow behind the Publications Building yesterday. Summers are
a little easier for Harden. He drives a power mower and grass
doesn't come in 8-inch avalanches.
Sportsmen's Joy, Snow
Spells Grief for Crews

By DAVE THOMAS ,
What turned out to be Ann Ar-
bor's heaviest snow in more than
three years, began to fall Tues-
day afternoon an9 a two-day per-
Feature Bistro
In Gulantics
Tomorrow
Campus Talent
Will Sing, Dance
Tomorrow night Hill Auditori.
um will house a night club.
On the concert stage, trans-
formed into a bistro, Gulantics
Review will make its annual ap-
pearance with a full booking of
campus talent.
SPONSORED BY the Glee club,
Union and League the vaudeville
show will include song, dance and
comedy acts by campus groups, as
well as individuals.
Throat whistling, Dixieland4
and Glee club song renditions
also will be featured.. Ted Smith
and his orchestra will provide
a musical background for the
review.
Bob Hollbrok, master of cere-
monies of the first Gulantics show
last year will be on hand again to
emcee.
AUDITIONS for Gulantics were
held early this year. Approximate-
ly 13 acts were chosen at that
time to appear in the review.
The show goes on at 8 p.m. to-
morrow night. Tickets, priced at
60 cents, are on sale at Hill Au-
ditorium.
Applications Due
For NSA Travel
Students interested in partici-
pating in the National Student As-
sociation's "travel-study abroad"
programs this summer should file
an application with NSA's Inter-
national office at Cambridge,
Mass., by March 8, according to
Lee Winneg, director of the NSA-
Student Legislature travel bureau.
Application blanks may be ob-
tained from 4 to 5 p.m. daily at
the travel bureau office in Lane
Hall Students will be selected by
NSA on the basis of academic in-
terest, extra-curricular activities
and language proficiency.
Picture Contracts
To lBe Discussed
Ann Arbor and student photo-
graphers will meet together at
4:30 p.m. today in Room 3K,
Union, to work out a plan for
awarding picture - taking con-
tracts at all-campus dances held
at the IM Building.
The meeting, sponsored by the
Student Legislature varsity com-
mittee, is an outgrowth of a major
controversy over the dance con-
tracts earlier this year.
Generation' Sales
Advance orders for "Genera-
tion" can now be obtained in the
Student Publications Building,
according to Charles Olsen, '51,
editor of. the new arts magazine.
The 100 page publication will
sell for 35 cents.

iod of frenzied activity began for
the grounds crew of the University
Plant Department.
It was a dry, fine snow-Just
right for winter sports-and stu-
dents began to wax up their skis
and toboggans. But each addition-
al inch added more difficulties to
the job of grounds supervisor Sam-
uel Wylie and his 20-man crew.
TUESDAY NIGHT his crews
moved into action, clearing the 22
miles of walks, drives and parking
lots which were blanketed with
the two-inch fall.
Wylie's troubles were just be-
ginning, however, for on Wed-
nesday an additional six inches
fell. His men bundled up and
went out into the snow again.
POWER BROOMS and tractor
plows scrubbed and scraped at the
walks.. Larger tractors and a big
power wagon attacked snow-
clogged drives. A bulldozer clank-
ed and roared in parking lots
where occasional parked cars
sometimes stymied their attempts.
Three trucks were kept busy haul-
ing the white stuff away.
The crews worked until 1 a.-
m., as the snow continued to
fall. They were up and at it
again by 5 a.m., the whine of
their straining tractor engines
splitting the muffled stillness of
the dawn.
By yesterday afternoon, the
weary snow fighters had begun to
see daylight, but the job wasn't
done. Peach Mountain, 17 miles
away outside Dexter, where the
University has an observatory and
radio transmitter, still remained
to be cleared.
"I hope this is all for a while,"
said Wylie yesterday. "We've just
about run through our budget."
Central Voice
Planned For
Dormitories
A committee of reprsentatives
from University dormitories on
campus has drawn up a plan to
provide a central voice for house
inhabitants, according to Dick
Pearson, '50B, of Hayden House in
East Quad.
"One of the main objectives
of the plan for a residence hall
council is to provide the students
with an official body which could
consult with the Board of Gover-
nors of the Residence Halls on
dorm problems," Pearson said. He
also pointed out that the coun-
cil wouldnbe abletto provide repre-
sentation to the Big Ten Resi-
dence Hall conferences held each
spring.
STRESSING the fact that the
Council would be a cooperative
venture, Pearson explained the
body would function through the
houses. It would be used to fur-
nish a more coordinated social
program between the dorms, and
to provide a clearing house for
the exchange of dormitory aca-
demic study program plans.
The committee, composed of
Pearson, Jane Fest, '50, Gene
Lamb, '51, Thoburn Stiles, '51,
George Roumell, '51, Ray Litt,
'52E, Roger Roemisch, Ray Sten-
strom, '52E and Doug Cutler, 52,
has been formulating the coun-
cil pian since last November, when
they received the "go-ahead" sg-
nal at a house-president's meeting.
The plan is being considered at
dormitory house meetings this
week. The outcome will be an-
nounced at a meeting of house
presidents Feb. 28.

Med School
Costs Limit
Many--Scott
Claims Schools
Take Full Load
"Cost of a medical education is
the most important limitation to
the number of students admitted
to medical schools," according to
Dean Gordon H. Scott of the
Wayne University Medical School.
Speaking before a Pre-Medical
Society meeting, Dean Scott said
no medical school purposely keeps
the enrollment below the number
of students it can handle.
"THES LABORATORY method
of teaching, the greatest contri-
bution to medical teaching in
1,000 years, is the biggest reason
for the large expense of a medical
education," Dean Scott said.
Medical schools are constant-
ly striving to maintain their
standards, Dean Scott reported.
But they would have to spend
$65,000,000 on their facilities
and an equal amount yearly on
their faculties to bring them up
to the 1940 minimum standard.
Students can do as much public
service by teaching the basic medi-
cal sciences, such as bio-chemistry
and anatomy as they could as
doctors, Dean Scott said, without
the MD degree. An expanding
medical school will depend on the
number of such teachers avail-
able, he said.
*1 * * -
MEDICAL RESEARCH does not
depend on the possession of a
medical degree, Dean Scott re-
ported. All the degree does is
legallytpermit the holder to care
for patients.
He stressed the fact that
character and general ability to
reason well are more important
than high sciencegrades.
Dean Scott compared the stu-
dent who "gets all A's in his
science courses and lacks general
character and ability" to the "vil-
lage fool who can memorize the
numbers of freight cars as they
pass through a town."
Law School
Entrance Test
Called'Snap'
At last the University student
is offered an exam that "can be
taken in stride, without cram-
ming and without undue concern."
That is the advice offered in a
bulletin of information for stu-
dents planning to take the Law
School Admission Test Saturday.
The test, which is given four times
a year, is designed for students
planning to make application for
admission to a law school.
* * *
ACCORDING to some aspiring
law students, the test is one of the
longest and toughest exams given
on this campus.
"The test is made difficult in
order to discriminate between
students of different degrees of
aptitude," Edward J. Furst, of
the Bureau of Psychological Ser-
vices, explained. "The exam is
set up to identify people who
would be good risks for law
school work."

"Bt: it's not the sole factor in
determining admittance to law
sch'ool;," he added. "It is used
mo e'as a supplement to other
crijerla such as college records,
hogor. or awards, recommenda-
tic::s and interviews," Furst said.
"IN GENERAL, the questions
are designed to measure the can-
didate's understanding of words
and word relationships, his ability
to read with understanding and
discrimination and his capacity
for rmasoning logically in terms of
verbal and non verbal symbols,"
he added.
"The test is developed by the
Educational Testing Service and is
administered throughout the na-
tion," he declared.
WQ Elects Diener
New President
William Diener, '51E, was elect-
ed president of the West Quad-
rangle last night at- a meeting of
the West Quad Council.
The Council named out-going
president George Roumell, '51, to
represent the West Quad at a
conference of Big Ten Residence
Halls delegates which will be held
at Bloomington, Ind., in April.
"The Place of Residence Halls
on Campus" will be discussed at
the conference.

i

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FOR RENT
MODERNG3 ROOM APT.-Adults only.
3-5732 Goddard Rd., Romulus. Phone
Romulus 412F4. ) 4F

WANTED TO BUY
USED LEICA, Imarect view finder, 90mm
lens, 135mm lens. Write Bowers, Box
273, Law Club. )2W
LOST & FOUND
FOUND IN ARBORETUM - Engraved
compact.Pick up at O.S.A. No ques-
_tibns asked. ________)7P
LOST - Parker '51, grey, silver cap.
"Anne Siuyter" engraved on pen. Call
3-1122. ___ ____)181,
LOST-Horn-rimmed tortise shell glass-
es, Friday ,Feb. 17. Ph. 2-2591. Ask
for Lois Comb. Reward. ) 16L
LOST-Jacket inside Arboretum gates.
Call Bob, 402 Cooley House, East Quad
or turn into Lost and Found of U.M.
_ ) 17L
LOST-Saturday night in Student Pub-
lications Building, a red rectangular
purse with fringed pocket on side,
zipper across top. Will offer reward
if all identification and a very im-
portant key in wallet are returned
intact. Call Nancy Bylan, 2-3241. )15L

FOR SALE

15.

FOR SALE

MEDICAL RESEARCH MICROSCOPE-
1060 power, $125. F. Vratny, 424 Cooley.
" ) 30
EASY Portable Washing Machine. Spin-
drier, $30. Ph. 2-7388. )31
WALNUT DESK-Walnut finished with
adjustable shelves; maple dresser; tele-
phone stand with chair; floor lamp;
3-piece sectional dusty rose tapestry
davenport. Ph. 2-6032, 1500 Geddes
Ave. ) 34
MONEY SAVERS-Navy T-shirts, 45c.
Khaki pants, $2.99. All wool athletic
hose, 49c. Marlboro gabardine sport
shirts, $3.99. Navy type oxfords, $6.88.
Open 'til 6 p.m. SAMS STORE 122 E.
Washington St. )5
UNDERWOOD - Standard typewriter
(upright) good condition, $30. 318
Tyler Hse. Ph. 2-4591. )32
WOMAN'S white figure Ice skates, size
nine, good condition. Call Joyce
Mersereau, 2-8266. )33
Key Punch Jobs
The University Personnel Office
needs six students who can oper-
ate IBM and key punch machines
for part time work. Hours will be
arranged to fit class schedules and
interested persons may contact the
Personnel Office, 3026Adminis-
tration Bldg.

JOHN-Thanks for the inside info on
the 39c luncheon at J. D. Miller's
Cafeteria. Boy that entre, potato,
vegetable, bread, butter and beverage
really taste good. What a buy. Hank.
)2P
TOBY never missed his eleven o'clock.
Who is Toby? )18P
DEAR TRACY-The book you want is
out of print. I can give you a liberal
translation. Johnny. )19P
NEWS FROM CLUB 211-Club 211's new
policy-there is no expiration date on
meal tickets! Tickets good any day-
need not be used on consecutive days.
Expires only when completely punch-
ed. )2P
HEY PETE-The daily 59c dinner special
at J. D. Miller's Cafeteria is a real
moneysaver. Believe it or not, this
includes entree, potato, vegetable,
salad or dessert (pie or cake), bread,
butter, beverage. Try it yourself!
Only 59c. Yours, Bill. )2P
ASCH-Kiss me or I'll die. STAN. )15P
DEMAND is starting for SPRING coats,
suits, and children's garments. Get
yours in early.
NEARLY NEW SHOP
311 East Huron )8B

COUSINS
on State Street
Come in and select a new skirt in
solid colors and checks. From $5.95.
MAKE TIME OR LIFE a part of your
college life. Special reduced Student
Rates available ($4.75 a year-instead
of $6) to make it easier. Phone Stu-
dent Periodical Agency, 2-82-42. We'll
bill you. )2
SEVEN FOOT SKIS, binders and poles.
Excellent- condition. Call 28841. )26
TAME YOUNG Parakeets, Canaries and
Love Birds. Bird supplies and cages.
Mrs. Ruffins, 562, S.7th. )2B
WOOD
For fireplace or furnace. Call 3-4575.
~-~--

PERSONAL

PERSONAL
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
209 S. State
_______ Phone 81_61 __ )1P
MEN WANTED to eat at fraternity
house. Excellent food, moderate pric-
es. Close to campus. Call Bud Ph.
3039. )loP
BUSINESS
SE RVICES
ALTERATIONS -Ladies garments, 410
Observatory, near Hospital and Dor-
mitories. Ph. 2-2678. )19B
SYLVIA STUDIO OF DANCE--Ballroom,
tap, acrobatic, ballet. Over Michigan
Theater. Phone 8066. __) 9B
STUDENT TYPING and job applica-
tions expertly done. Reasonable rates.
Will call for and deliver. Ph. 6341.
21B
GROUP PHOTOS
Weddings a Specialty
CHUCK NICHOLS
Ph. 8528 715 E. Huron )20B
PROMPT SERVICE on all typewriter
repairs. MOSELEY TYPEWRITER &
SUPPLY CO., 214 E. Washington. )5B
SYLVIA STUDIO OF DANCE-Ballroom,
tap, acrobatic, ballet. Over Michigan
Theater. Phone 8066. )9B
LEAVE JUNIOR with a reliable baby
sitter while you go out-anytime.
Kiddie Kare, 3-1121. )10B
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
Ukeleles "- $5.50
New and Used Instruments
209 B. Washington )4B
TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales and Service
UORRILL'S-314 S. State St. 11B
HILDEGARDE SHOPPE
109 E. Washington
Expert Alterations
Custom Clothes
byEstablished Tradition. 3B
HAVE YOUR typewriter repaired by the
Office,- Equipment Service Company,
215 F. Liberty. 4
WASHING and, or, ironing done in my
own home. Free pick up and deliv-
ery.: " Phone 2-9020. lB

DOUBLE AND SINGLE ROOM for males.
Reasonable. 943 Greenwood. Ph. 6059.
) 36R
DESIRABLE SLEEPING ROOM for boys.
Innerspring mattresses, 1335 . Uni-
versity. )22R
DOUBLE FURNISHED rooms and suites
-student or working man. Student
couples accommodated. No cooking.
Twin beds, shower, continuous hot
water, reasonable. Close to campuis
and Union. 509 b. Division near Jef-
ferson. )30R
CHOICE FIRST FLOOR ,DOUBLE -
TWIN BEDS. NEVER'BEFORE RENT-
ED. NEAR CAMPUS. 325 E. JEFFER-
SON. Ph. 3-4738. )34R
WELL FURNISHED ROOM at 15134S.
University. Either single or double.
Ph. 3-4701. )27R
ONE-HALF of large pleasant room near
campus available for male student.
Also one small double. Call 6876. 8B
DOUBLE ROOM for male students. 3%
blocks from campus. Hollywood beds.
Shower. $5 per week each. Ph. 5750.
) 35R
SINGLE ROOM for male students, 31,2
blocks from campus. Hollywood beds,
shower. $7.00 per week. Ph. 5750. )19R
VACANCY for male students. Rooms
can be used as apartment. Also double
rooms. Call 2-2052. 8R
ATTRACTIVE single room. Cooking
privileges. 507 E. Liberty and 1106
Lincoln. Ph. 5224. )14R
SINGLE ROOM, newly decorated, quiet,
near Yost Field House. Call evenings,
3-4895. )21R
TRANSPORTATION

GLOS'

ROOMS
FOR RENT

1)

CHICAGO-Leaving Friday noon.
turning Sunday. Ph. 8975.

Re-
)lT

'A'

EARN
PIN MONEY
by representing us in exclusive
college novelties for young la-
dies. This is an unusual oppor-
tunity to earn some real money.
WRITE FOR PARTICULARS TO
DON CO.
1776 Broadway, New York

' Continuous
from- 1 P.M.

Wlik d M

Weekdays
44c to 5 P.M.

TODAY AND SATURDAY
C#
Starrin
RICHARD BASEHART " AUDREY TOTTER
CYD CHARISSE - BARRY SULLIVAN

""""""

OMWI

No. Main - Opp. Court House
'RIDING A MURDERER'S TRAIL
and his stallion, "BLACK JACK"
leT5 V 7it04
A REPUBIC
PICTURE

TODAY,' & SAT.
MAT. 30c NIGHTS & SUN. 40c
RolAndWne
Added CARTOON

I

POPEYE
CARTOON

Extra Added-
"LET'S GO
BOATI NG"

WORLD
NEWS

COMING SUNDAY
Gene Tierney "WHIRLPOOL"

I

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--"-

...

. f

I

i

The Most Convenient Way
to Shop in Ann Arbor,
at the

a't Gin em a /eaue
PRESENTS

3

BEER
DEPOT

i

Louis Jouvet
in the Satire of a man
who almost convinces
himself
fDr. Knock'
at
Lydia Mendelssohn

CONVENIENT DRIVE-THRU SERVICE
114 E. Williams Phone 7191
Daily 10 A.M. - 10 P.M. Sunday Noon - 7 P.M.

. r r r .

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,J

HELD OVER! Thru Sunday!

' O FICE
OPEN
2-9 P.M.

The ACpdemy BEST PICTURE OF THE YEARI
Award Winner! BEST ACTOR OF THE YEAR!I
Laurence .
presents
. y WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE A Universal-Inteunational Release
A J. ARTHUR RANK ENTERPRISE

friday and Saturday, February 24 and 25

8:30 P.M.

ALL SEATS RESERVED

Phone 6300

f

Admission 50c

rmlw

-1

C cJN " p
1 rv.,ytNf. F 1}+ r ,
1' %:tt

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT
Three Times Daily
2:30-5:30-8:30
ADMISSION 74c (tax inc.)
A few seats $1.20 (tax inc.)

Phone 5651
ENDS SUNDAY!

-I

_. .....

h.

Glee Club- Union- League
Presents
GULantcs
A star-studded program
Comedy-Music-Beautiful Girls
BOB HALLBROOK MIKE CRAVER
Master of Ceremonies Warm-up

Mats 25c Nights 35c

ITe gell 4 be i~'inf My
at
808 SOUTH STATE STREET
OPEN FROM 7 A.M. to 8 P.M.
7 DAYS A WEEK

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- II _ . .

p C N GRnI

Playing All Week
44c until 5 - Then 60c

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