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June 02, 1950 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-06-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


FRJDAY, JUNE %. 1950

THE MI HIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEWN

...............................................~..;......:.:...
THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE S~V~N

BACK TO NORMAL: . .
Better Living Conditions
Sought For Dormtories
41>

ti (EDITOR'S NOTE - This is the
ninth and last in a series on the
Michigan House Plan of residence
halls.)
By JOHN DAVIES
Less crowding in the dorms -
"back to normal" - is the most
common suggestion for improve-
ment of the Michigan House Plan
of residence halls.
"When the dorms get back to
two in rooms designed for two,
residence halls living will be much
more satisfying," Dean Emeritus
of Students Joe Bursley comment-
ed.
* * *
BETTER FOOD figured heavily
in all dorm improvement sugges-
Aon lists, both in men's and wom-
eih's residence halls.
George Roumell, '51, SL presi-
dent and former president of the
West Quad Council, thought
"more flexible interpretation of

residence halls regulations"
would make the House Plan
stronger.
Many suggestions were aimed
owards the residents themselves.
Keith Conway, '51E, president of
Tyler House, felt that "student
apathy" is responsible for keep-
ing dorm life from being as bene-
ficial as it could be.
* * *
EAST QUAD COUNCIL Presi-
dent Ray Litt, '52E, felt that an
all-residence halls weekend, in-
cluding a conference of all men
and women's dorm leaders, a re-
cognition banquet and a big dance
would improve the dorm system.
But all suggestions for dorm im-
provement were not far reaching.
A Michigan House man listed bet-'
ter telephone service as an im-
portant residence hall need.

* *W*; * * * * *
AVOID
The bank is
the first place
to be notif ied of a
change of address
TUE ANN ARBOR BANK
Corner Main-Huron Streets
U. of M. Branch, 330 South State
1108 S. University
** * **I* ***

-aily-Auian Reia
FLYCHASER - Jim McGlincy,
'52, claims to have discovered a
fool-proof way to deal with the
flies and mosquitos which are
a major hot weather annoy-
ance to all males with receding
hair lines. According to Mc-
Glincy, the large spider which he
painted on his scalp Wednes-
day does such ,a good job of
frightening away insects that he
is considering having it tatoo-
ed on for good.
Deadline Extended
On OperaScripts
Because too few Union Opera
Scenerios have been submitted, the
deadline for scripts has been ex-
tended to July 1, Gene Overbeck,
'51, Opera manager announced
last night.
Scenarios should be addressed to
Gene Overbeck, Union Opera, and
left at the Union desk, until June
12. After that time they should be
mailed to Overbeck, 1111 Louis-
ville Ave., St. Louis, Mo. Each
scenario should be accompanied by
the address of the sender.

Four Seek
Michener's
House Seat
The decision of Rep. Earl C.
Michener, Republican from the
Second Michigan District, to re-
tire at the end of this year, has
brought several candidates from
both parties forward to claim the
vacated post.
Jack Larsen, '52L, has an-
nounced that he will seek the
Democratic nomination in the
second Congressional district this
fall. He is employed as a research
engineer at the University, at-
tending Law School part time.
* * *
ANOTHER DEMOCRATIC can-
didate for nomination is William
C. Sterling III of Monroe. Ann Ar-
bor is a part of the second district.
State Rep. John W. Bannasch,
now serving his fourth term in
the Michigan Legislature, an-
nounced that he would seek
nomination on the Republican
ticket. A graduate of the Uni-
versity Law School, Bannasch
is from Jackson.
Henry C. Barnes, Jr. Ann Arbor
building firm president, has al-
ready filed qualifying petitions for
Michener's seat.
73-year-old Rep. Michener an-
nounced Wednesday that he will
retire to his Adrian home at the
conclusion of his term to be near
his wife, an invalid for two years,
He has been a member of Con-
gress since 1920, except for two
years, and at present stands tenth
in point of service in the House.
In the 80th Congress, he was
chairman of the House Committee
on Judiciary, and in the present
Democratic Congress he is the
ranking minority member of the
committee.
Art Reprints Due
Art reprints borrowed by stu-
dents during the semester must
be returned today, according to
Mrs. Eloise Wilkinson, director of
the program.
Students will be fined five cents
per picture for each day after to-
day that the prints are not re-
turned, she added.

Tradition Scratched

LCOSTS LESS BY AIR
TO GET TUKS T
Ship your trunk via
CAPITAL AIRLINES AIR FREIGH
For pick up call Ann Arbor Taxi C
3-4244
m*
A-I/B

-U
rHEIRE
HT
m
'..
=U

,__

--Daily-Alex Laniaan
CARVING CO-EDS-Seniors Sidney Steck, Kitty Campbell, Jody
Johnson and Phoebe Good, left to right, flaunt Union tradition by
carving their initials in the taproom table reserved for male sen-
iors. Striking with commando-like efficiency yesterday afternoon,
the foursome boldly seized the Union's carving tools for their
work. Ring-leader Campbell blamed the unprecedented action on
a suppressed desire to "show the Union." Leisurely males present
gaped but failed to come to the rescue of the table.
SL Summer Group Named

for
LAW BOOKS

,,

4

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

A specially appointed SL Sum-
mer Committee will represent stu-
dent government on campus this
summer, George Roumell, '51, SL
president, announced yesterday.
Arnold Miller, '50, was chosen to
head the group, appointed by the
SL cabinet at its last meeting.
Dorianne Zipperstein, '51, Keith
Beers, '52E, and Tom Walsh, '51L,
were also elected for committee
duty.
The Summer Committee will not
be a policy making body, but will
act as the SL liaison to the Uni-
versity for the short session. The
group will continue to calendar
campus events for the fall semes-
ter, and will conduct research for
fall student projects, Roumell said.
Read Daily Classifieds

Tentative plans of the commit-
tee include the sponsoring of an
all-campus dance. The group will
also work with the NSA commit-
tee in helping to arrange for the
National Student Congress, to be
held here August 23-31.

Oerbeck Bookstore

1216 South University

r

,v

]I.

,p

r

I

(Continued from Page 6)
June 21-Wed. 2:00-3:30.
June 22-Thurs. 10:30-12:00 and
2:00-3:30.
June 23-Fri. 10:30-12:00 and
2:00-3:30.
June 24-Sat. 9:00-10:00.
Attention June Graduates: Col-
lege of Literature, Science, and the
Arts, School of Education, School
of Music: Students are advised not
to request grades of I or X in June.
When such grades are absolutely
imperative, the work must be made
up in time to allow your instruc-
tor to report the make-up grade
not later than noon June 21, 1950.
Grades received after that time
may defer the student's gradua-
tion until a later date.
Recommendations for Depart-
mental Honors: Teaching depart-
ments wishing to recommend ten-
tative June graduates from the
College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts, and the School of Edu-
cation for departmental honors
should recommend such students
in a letter sent to the Registrar's
Office, 1513 Administration Build-
ing, by noon of June 19.
Events Today
University Museums Friday Eve-
ning Program: "Factors in Mam-
malian Development and Defense."
Exhibits on display in the Mu-
seums building from 7 to 9 p.m.
Short reels of moving pictures:
"Animals Growing Up," "How Ani-
mals Eat," and "How Animals De-
fend Themselves," Kellogg Audi-
torium, 7:30 p.m. Exhibit: "Amer-
ican Indian Stimulants, rotunda,
Museums building.
Religion in Life Week Inter-
Faith Committee: Meet at Lane
Hall, 5-7 p.m.
Lane Hall Coffee Hour: 4:30-6
p.m., Lane Hall lounge.
Coming Events
Naval Research Reserve: Mon.,
June 5, 7:30 p.m., 18 Angell Hall.
Lieut. Comdr. Phillip May, U.S.
M.C., Commanding Officer, Marine
Air Detachment, USNAS Grosse
Ile will speak and show a short
film.
U. of M. Hostel Club: Sat. and
Sun., June 3-4. Saline Farm Bike
Overnight. Meet at League, 9 a.m.,
Saturday with bike, pass, eating
utensils and sheet for jaunt to Sa-
line Hostel f'or swimming, farm
sight-seeing, out-door cooking, and
evening square dancing. Return
Sun. after early morning dip and
breakfast. Anyone wishing to come
just for square dancing welcome.
Phone leader by Thurs. for re-
servations. Ralph Deblois, 3-4335.

7he rIiyabetA ' Ikl0 c!/wpr
South State St. - Just off North U. in Campus Town
SCHOOL-E
SALE CONTI UESo
Reductions to
7/2 and below
original prices
Spring Coats -- Suits
Dresses-Skirts - Blouses
Handbags - Costume Jewelry
Gloves - Hats
THE COATS . . . Long & Short Toppers
Originally from $35.00 to $69.95
Sizes 9-20
THE SUITS . .. 100% wool tweeds - crepes --
sharkskins - gabardine and tricoteen
Originally $39.95 to $69.95
Sizes 9-15 10-42 1212 to 2412
Two groups of rayon sharkskin and
gabardine SUITS
$10.00 and $14.95
Orig. $16.95 to $25.00
Sizes 9-18

Y R
ou

AEGE

will buy

for

I

I

W , ,
i

(

i

IT'S SO EASY to sell your discarded books to
FOLLETTS. Textbook values decrease rapid-
ly as new editions and more up-to-date books
are constantly being published.
SELL YOUR BOOKS as soon as you have had

your

exams

and get today's top value for

them.

I

POOR "GAHG" IS DAID

DAYTIME DRESSES
Sizes 9-15-10-44-12/2-24%/
Pure Silks - Nylon Prints
Rayon Crepes
Prints - Nylsilks
1 piece and suit styles
Originally $10.95 to $35.00
Also
Evening and Dinner Dresses
Sizes 9-40

HANDBAGS
Plastic, Patent, and Calf
Failles, Cordes, and Leathers
$1.98 to $5.00
Orig. $3.95 to $10.95
COSTUME JEWELRY
Earrings, Pins, Necklaces,
Bracelets, and Rings

I

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