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June 01, 1950 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-06-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JUNE 1, 1950

Urge Liberal Speaker Policy

I.

William R. Lesile, Wm. J. Le-
Veque, Harold M. Levinson, C. Lev-
inthal, Rensis Likert, Ronald Lip-
pitt, Karl Litzenberg, Elwood G.
Lohela, Dwight C. Long, Robert
J. Lowry.
M
F. D. H. Macdowall, Merrill Mc-
Clatchey, Wilbert J. McKeachie,
D. B. McLaughlin, K. C. McMurry,
Saul Maloff, Albert H. Marck-
wardt, Donald G. Marquis.
Imanuel Marx, J. Masuoka,
Wesley H. Maurer, Bruno Mei-
necke, William Wayne Meinke,
James H. Meisel.
E. A. Mercado, W. G. Merhab,
Daniel R. Miller, Edd Miller,
James E. Miller, Jr., Orren Moh-
ler, D. E. Morley, John Muehl, Paul
Mueschke, R. A. Musgrave.
N
Mary Needham, Robert J. Neiss,
Norman E. Nelson, C. J. Nesbitt,
Theodore M. Newcomb, Franklin
B. Newman, Hugh Norton.
O
H. V. S. Ogden, I. LaMont Okey,
Willard C. Olson, James C. O'Neill,
J. R. Ortiz.
P
Wm. B. Palmer, Lila Pargment,
D. A. Park, Anthony M. Pasque-
riello, Charles H. Peake, O. M.
Pearl, George A. Peek, Jr., Shorey
Peterson, George Piranian, Law-
rence Preuss, Ernst Pulgram.
Q
R. W. Quimby.
R
G. Y. Rainich, A. S. Ray, Max-
well O. Reade, Charles F. Remer,
Warner G. Rice, R. K. Ritt, James
H. Robertson.
S
Hans Samelson, F. Sanchez y
Escribano, George Satter, William
M. Sattler, Shirley Savage, V. A.
Scanio, Earl Schubert, Katherine
E. Schultz.
Allan Seager, M. W. Senstius, I.
L. Sharf man, Harry P. Shelley,'
John F. Shephard, Hide Shohara,
G. Winston Sinclair, Chester B.
Slawson.
Preston W. Slosson, Warren L.
Smith, F. K. Sparrow, Albert C.
Spaulding, Ralph Spielman, Paul
M. Spurlin.
Charles N. Staubach, William C.
Steere, W. R. Steinhoff, Albert K.
Stevens, Charles L. Stevenson, A.
H. Stockard, Eric W. Stockton, W.
F. Stolper, Daniel B. Suits, G. B. B.
M. Sutherland, G. E. Swanson.
T
Marvin Tableman, Charles C.
Templeton, F. H, Test, Fred P.
Thieme, Homer L. Thomas, Mor-
gan Thomas, Franklin M. Thomp-
son, R. M. Thrall, B. D. Thuma,
Mischa Titiev, Leonard Torn-
heim, F. S. Turneaure.
V
L. G. Vander Velde, Manfred C.
Vernon.
W
Fred G. Walcott, Edward L. Wal-
ker, Althea H. Warren, Austin
Warren, Leonard L. Watkins, John
Weimer, Carlton F. Wells, Harold
E. Wethey, Philip R. Wikelund,
William B. Willcox, A. E. Wood,
Lloyd S. Woodburne, Edmund
Wooding.
Y

From Port Radium, site of im-
portant uranium and radium ore
deposits, comes the material for
radiation experiments beingacon-
ducted at the University's Botan-
ical Gardens.
These,, on the Garden's spacious
grounds in the south-east sec-
tion of Ann Arbor, amidst speci-
mens of the renowned Ohio "Buck-
eyes," and rare Japanese twining
willows, plants from naturally rad-
iodctive areas are being studied.
* * *
THESE GRASSES and flowers
shipped from the Arctic Circle re-
gion, are planted in the green-
houses and on the grounds of
the Gardens where they are being
tested to determine the effect rad-
ioactivity has on their evolution-
ary and hereditary characteristics.
According to Prof. H. H. Bart-
lett of the Botany Department
who originated the experiments,
many of the plants have died
before they reached the stage
when they could be examined.
They are accustomed to the cold
Artic weather, and evidently can-,
not thrive because of the extreme
change in temperature.
"MOST OF the plants that do
grow, have shown no differences
that can surely be attributed to
radioactivity," said Prof. Bartlett,
"and those that have died, showed
signs of possible important varia-
tions. It is a difficult, situation."
Furthermore, many of the spe-
cies must flower before they
can be analyzed, and although
the Artic dandelions prosper as
only dandelions can, there are
other more important plants
that do not bloom.
Examples of the peculiarities
that might be caused by contact
with the atomic radiation are,
sterility, dwarfing, the extreme-
ly close growth of leaves, and es-
pecially, the emergence of two or
more distinct types of plants in
culttwes from the same parent,
Prof. Bartlett said.
IE DESCRIBED two types of
"Ladies' Tobacco,",that seemed to
be growing sturdily, and which
locked as if they might turn out
to be perfectspeciments for com-
parative study.
Then, for no apparent reason,
all the plants of one type died,
leaving a single set of identical
plants of the other type.

Arctic relation of a
growing plant that
highly successful.

temperate
is proving

Many of these plants, "chen-
opodiums," grew from the Arctic
seeds, and all but three were
killed by disease a short time
after their arrival.
This is important because it is
now hoped that the remaining
three healthy plants will transmit
their disease resistant tendencies
to a second generation and there
will in time be abundant progeny
available for study.
* * *
THE FIFTY-ONE acres of the
Botanical Gardens support the
growth of many other interesting
types of vegetation.
Among these are pecan trees,
which do not usually thrive fur-
ther north than Illinois; an
example of the Russian 'May-
Day' Tree; a dwarf hawthorn
which is the only known seedling
of the oldest cultivated plant in
Asia; cross-pollinated crab-ap-
ple trees which are being used
to demonstrate variations in
plants originating from seeds
of the same parent.
Also, the 'Gardens' boasts the
largest plot of persimmon trees
in Michigan, and an unusual mem-
orial thicket of the Cole haw-
thorn, named for Miss Cole of
Grand Rapids, who was a bene-
factor of the Michigan Depart-
ment of Botany.

I

I
14

0 0
Buotanists LEx mi ie
Research Pushed at t
Botanical Gardens

A

fsI

~~1.4

MICHIGAN FLOWERS-Donna Mayer, '53, one of the infrequent visitors to the University Botani-
cal Gardens admires a branch of crab-apple blossoms. The Gardens which are situated in the
south-east section of town are open to the public.

I.

14

A
Daily
:Photo
Featture
Story by.
Alice Mencher
Pictures b
Ed Kozma

TOUR OF INSPECTION-The long greenhouses and well-tended grounds of the University's Botani-
cal Gardens are familiar sights to botany students, who make frequent field trips to the 51-acre
tract. Here, two coeds are shown the lay of the land.

Joseph K. Yamagiwa,
Young, Jr.

Gail S.

V
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PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S * PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S * PAY

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BEER Prices Effective Thursday,
WINE Friday, Saturday
CHAMPA NE WeReserve the Right To Limit
CHAMPAGNS Quantities.

k

Bring This Coupon FOUNTAIN SPECIAL
MAXWELL HOUSE PINEAPPLE SUNDAE ,E
COFFEE 69e SAT. ONLY 1:00-5:00

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14

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USP
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$1.10 CANASTA
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