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June 01, 1950 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-06-01

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JUNE 1, 1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

U

PRING RUSH-BIG HEADACHE:
Arboretum Gets Beauty Treatment Every Monday

* * *

* ~* *

* * *

By RON WATTS
Every Monday morning, four
men working for the University
tackle one of the biggest janitor
-: jobs in Ann Arbor.
At 8 a.m. the men gather at the
entrance to Nichols Arboretum,
and then move forward toward in-
numerable beer cans and bottles,
papers, half finished lunches and
other assorted articles in an at-
tempt to restore the arb to its
natural beauty.
One and a half days later their
job is finished - for another
week,
PROF. Harlow O. Whittemore,
director of Nichols Arboretum, has
noted a great increase in use of
the arb since the war. Prof. Whit-
temore who has been its director
for 16 years believes that atten-
dance in the arb has increased at
least 10 times in recent years.
"We try to keep the scenic
area looking like a park, but
with all the accumulation of
trash, campfires and cars cut-
ting up the hills and fields it
is rather difficult.
Prof. Whittemore has appeared
recently before several groups of
reidents in the women's dormi-
tories and asked their aid and
cooperation in keeping the arb
cleaned up.
"We have received many fine
suggestions from them, including
the idea of trash barrels at the
entrance which may be used soon,"
he said.
"Although our rush season will
soon be over, we want to ask all
the students and people to co-
operate with us in keeping the ar-
boretum in ship-shape condition,"
Prof. Whittemore remarked.

-Daily-Allan Reid
BEER CAN SEA-A vast pile of beer cans lies in silent testimony to the many parties held in the
arboretum this spring. The cans were piled by f our men working a day and a half each week, in an
effort to restore the arboretum to its natural beauty. However, beer cans are only a part of the
workers' job. They also must clean up a generous number of half-finished lunches, papers and
smashed bottles. Another worry for arb caretalkers is cars cutting up the fields and hillsides.

Freshman
Honorary
Initiates 88
Eighty-eight men were award-
ed the black and gold key of Phi
Eta Sigma, freshman scholastic
honorary, at initiation ceremonies
last night in the Union.
Ivan Parker, assistant to the
Dean of Students, urged the ini-
tiates to take full advantage of
extra-curricular opportunities at
college.
NEWLY ELECTED officers of
the society are Bob Olsen, '53,
president; Jack Ehlers, '53E, vice-
president; Robert Webb, '53, sec-
retary; Robert Bard, '53, treasur-
er; and Richard Eggleton, '53E,
historian.
Those initiated were Joseph
Amy, Charles Averill, Robert
Bard, David Barkkarie, William
Bates, Jerome Bernstein, Harry
Black, Frank Blanchard, David
Brown, Richard Brown, Robert
Carbeck, Russel Carlisle, Paul
Coleman, Richard Conover, Rod-
ney Cook, David Cookson, Harry
Criel, George Davidson, James
Douglas, Richard Eggleton,
Jack Ehlers.
Philip Einbury, Robert Erf,
Chester Fackler, William Filkins,
Gordon Fox, Arthur Freedman,
Howard Friedman, Paul Friedman,
Wilbur Friedman, Roger Gilmore,
William Halby, Charles Heitsch,,
Leland Henry, Shirley Henry,
Berne Jacobs, James Jacobs, Wil-
liam Jentes, Michael Kaprielian,
Jerome Kent, Edwin Kerr, Wil-
liam King.
Sidney Klaus, Thomas Krie-
wall, Sidney Kripke, Bertram
Kwasman, Wayne Lambert,
Robert Lawson, Paul Levin,
Robert MacGregor, David Man-
waring, Walter Meyer, Stanley
Millman, Daniel Miner, John
Nadeau, Franklin Norman, War-
ren Norquist, Robert Olsen,
Mark Oscherwitz, Charles
Paetzke, Theodore Pletsch, Ray-
mond Posvar.
Edward Prenner, Richard Rei-
mus, Jack Renirie, Leonard Sand-
weiss, Robert Schuur, David Scott,
Richard Sewell, James Shaner,
Gordon Sharp, William Shulevitz,
James Sonnega, Lawrence Sper-
ling, William Stason, William
Strickler, Lawrence Sweet, Nor-
man Thal, Norman Thomas, ,Al-
fred Thompson, Wesley True,
Adelbert Tweedie, Russel Vance,
John Velz, Robert Webb, Charles
Weingarten, Lawrence Wellman,
Richard Williamson.
IA

RAHN TO STAR:

At Mendelssohn Monday

'Barrier'

"The Barrier," a musical-drama
concerning race relations in the
South, will open a six-night run
at 8:30 p.m. Monday in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
Starring Murial Rahn, the
opera is scheduled for production
* *, ,,

THE STORY concerns a South-
ern plantation owner and his
troubles with the social customs
of the society in which he has
been reared. The barrier is racial
prejudice, which comes between
him and his children.
Miss Rahin, who plays the
Negro housekeeper, has done
extensive concert work and
sung with leading opera com-
panies. She originated the role
of Carmen in Broadway's "Car-
men Jones." She also played
the lead role in the Columbia
Opera Workshop's premiere
production of "The Barrier"
early this spring.
Music for the performance will
be by Marguerite and Jan Mey-
erowitz, at two pianos.
THE FINAL production of the
Ann Arbor Drama Season will be
George Bernard Shaw's satire,
"Getting Married," with an all-
star cast. It will open a six-night
run at 8:30 p.m. June 12 in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.

To Begin Run

MURIEL RAHN
. .."Barrier" Star
* * -
on Broadway this fall. The libret-
to is by Langston Hughes from
his own play, "The Mulatto." Mu-
sic is by Jan Meyerowitz.

CLASS CONSCIOUS:
Coed Doesn't Know Whether
She's Sophomore or Senior

By LORRAINE BUTLER
Vera Koroton, displaced German
student, does not know whether
she is a sophomore or a senior.
After having earned approxi-
mately one hundred credits at
the University of Munich, Miss

Koroton arrived in Ann
Feb. 6 of this year to
her education.

Arbor on
complete

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

F-1 Continued from Page 6)
p.m., Thurs., June 2. Program
will include March from Athalie,
Consolation, and Spring Song by
endelssohn; Prelude for Caril-
lon by Rusterholz; three folk songs
and four sacred airs.
Exhibitions
Museum of Art, Alumni Memor-
lal Hall: Far Eastern Art and
Howard Cook -- Graphic Work,
through June 18; weekdays 9-5,
Sundays 2-5. The public is invited.

t
K
C

t

Photographs of the work of Wil-
' 1Ham Musehenheim, architect of
New York, now visiting lecturer in
the "College of Architecture and
Design; through June 10. First
floor corridor, Architecture Bldg.

Special Rotunda exhibit in Uni-
versity Museums building, "Amer-
ican Indian Stimulants." On dis-
play through June 30.
Events Today
Committee for Displaced Stu-
dents: Final meeting for all repre-
sentatives, 4:10 p.m., Lane Hall.
Agenda: Planning for next year
and election of new chairman.
Gilbert & Sullivan Society:
Meeting for all those who want
refunds on scores, reimbursement
for expenses, such as bus fare, etc.,
r and those who owe money to the
Society, 7:30 to 8:30 p.m., at the
League.
La P'tite Causette: 3:30 p.m.,
Grill Room, League.
International Center Weekly Tea:
4:30-6 p~n-.
s' U. of M. Soaring Club: Meeting
to discuss summer organization,
purchase of plane, etc., 7:30 p.m.,
1042 EE. All interested are wel-

Honor Soeiety
Initiates 13
Journalists
Thirteen journalism students
were initiated into Kappa Tau
Alpha, national honorary journal-
ism society, yesterday.
The initiates were: Robert
Bailyn, Grad.; William Byrne,
Grad.; Esther Canja, '48; Ray-
mond Courage, Grad.; Marvin Ep-
stein, '51; Nick Gergacz, '50; Fred
Keister, Grad.; Wilmer Rabe,
Grad.; Robert Schairer, '51;
George Riviere, '50; Yao Chi Tao,
Grad.; Elaine Toles, '51; and Jo-
seph Voorhees, '50.
Prof. Wesley H. Maurer, chair-
man of the journalism depart-
ment presided over the ceremony.
Kappa Tau Alpha was founded
in 1910 at the University of Mis-
souri. The University's chapter,
fourth in the nation, was estab-
lished in 1931. During the war the
chapter was inactive.
come. Flying experience not neces-'
sary.
Coming Events
U. of M. Hostel Club: Sat. and:
Sun., June 3-4. Saline Farm Bikel
Overnight. Meet at League, 9 a.m.,
Saturday with bike, pass, eating
utensils and sheet for jaunt to Sa-
line Hostel for swimming, farm
sight-seeing, out-door cooking, and
evening square dancing. Return
Sun. after early morning dip and
breakfast. Anyone wishing to come
just for square dancing welcome.
Phone leader by Thurs. for re-
servations. Ralph Deblois, 3-4335.
University Museums Friday Eve-
ning Program: "Factors in Mam-
malian Development, and Defense."
Exhibits on display in the Mu..
scums building from 7 to 9 p.m.
Short reels of moving pictures:
"Animals Growing Up," "How Ani-
mals Eat," and "How Animals De-
fend Themselves," Kellogg Audi-
torium, 7:30 p.m. Exhibit: "Amer-
ican Indian Stimulants," rotunda,
Museums building.

*. * *
AND NOW the University is
faced with the problem of trans-
lating her credits into the cor-
responding credit-hours of this
University. Because of this delay,
Miss Koroton is as undecided
about her study program as a
first semester freshman.
At the University of Munich,
Miss Koroton studied music
and medicine, while this semes-
ter she is taking such elemen-
tary courses as English I. She
believes that eventually she will
either major in languages or
continue her studies in medi-
cine.
Miss Koroton was born in the
Ukraine, but moved to Germany
in 1943. During the war she lived
near Hamburg and entered the
University of Munich in 1946.
HER EDUCATION is being fi-
nanced by Assembly, in coopera-
tion with the University Displaced
Student Fund.
Miss Koroton said, "I was de-
lighted with this student com-
munity and its activities and
was surprised to find so many
foreign students hgre at tr
University."
The peaceful attitude of the
American people greatly impressed
Miss Koroton. "In Germany one
is continually reminded of the
war."
Miss Koroton has found "the
most human University" in Ann
Arbor. She says that Americans
are the friendliest people she's
met - "everyone is everyone else's
friend the moment they meet."
ADVERTISEMENT
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Five years of college work are re-
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The first year must be completed
in an accredited college of arts and
sciences.
Thc second year also may be com-
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he taken at Chicago College of Op-
tometry.
The third, fourth and fifth years
are devoted to professional courses
which must be completed in an
accredited college of optometry.
Fall registration is now open at
Chicago College of Optometry, 350
B~eldenAve., Chicago 14, Ill. Dormi-
tory accommodations available on
the campus. The college is approved
for veterans.
r
Giftlike this
for PAD.

China Crisis
In UN Seen
By Efimenco
A crisis over China's represen-
tation in the United Nations may
come at the September meeting of
the General Assembly, N. Mar-
bury Efimenco, of the political
science department, said yester-
day.
At this meeting, Trygve Lie's
five-year term as secretary-gen-
eral expires, and the UN must
elect a new chief.
"If the great powers cannot
agree ona new candidate," Efi-
menco explained, "Lie will have
to run again." But T. F. Tsiang,
the Chinese Nationalist delegate,
recently made a statement that
he would veto a motion for Lie's
reelection, he noted.
The reason for this, Efimenco
explained, is that Lie has circu-
lated a memorandum to the mem-
bers of the UN, saying that the
Communist government at Peiping
legally has a strong case for rep-
resentation in the UN.!
The necessity of electing a sec-
retary-general may provide a new
impetus for seating a Chinese
Communist delegate, he said.
Efimenco questioned whether,
with the Nationalist government
no longer exercising authority,
China could for long be repre-
sented by the Nationalist delegate
in the UN.
He noted that, according to
Lie's memorandum, the UN need
not question the nature of the
government a delegate represents,
but only whether that govern-
ment has control of the territory
in question.
Read Daily Classifieds

Tickets for both
sale at the Lydia.
Theatre.

Long Playing

GILBERT & SULLIVAN OPERETTAS
By the D'Oylycarte Opera Company

NOW AVAILABLE on
LONDONf Frr RECORDS

THE GONDOLIERS
H. M. S. PINAFORE
TRIAL BY JURY

plays are on
Mendelssohn

moot

.- '

SPECIAL
CHICKEN in a BASKET
French Fries
Rolls and Butter
$1.00
Prompt Fountain Service

S

PIRATES OF PENZANCE
IIEAR THESE INCOMPARABLE RECORDINGS
AS CONDUCTED BY ISADORE GODFREY AT
77eI&ujric Centte*'

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At the CAMPUS BOOTERY

ANNUAL COLLEGE-END

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MEN'S and
WOMEN'S

04=;- '. <) mat ~ t) ;..;;;;;;> Os O<;;;;o r;;;>
SeniorJ!
o Take a bit of t.
MICHIGAN
with you!
THOUSANDS of Michigan Graduates are proudly wearing the
o OFFkCIAL Michigan ring. It instantly identifies them as gradu-
ates of a great University.

a, ATT

This will be a real sale

I

$30,000.00 STOCK OF FINE SHOES
Before thousands of students - teachers and others leave Ann Arbor
for the summer vacation. All new shoes just received INCLUDED
IN THIS OUR GREATEST SALE IN MANY YEARS,

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