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May 28, 1950 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-05-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

MUSICAL JOKERS DEFUNCT:
Overwork ,Causes Demise of Yelnats

By LEONARD GREENBAUM
To the haunting echoes of taps,
the Yelnats String Quartet has
been buried in a family plot in
front of Burton Memorial Tower.
The group, composed of gradu-
ate students in the School of Mu-
sic, made what turned out to be
its final appearance Thursday 2 t
a string quartet recital in Rack-
ham Hall.
The quartet's demise was at-
tributed to Beethoven's "Grosse
Fugue," one of the most difficult
works written for a quartet. Worn
and exhausted by rehearsals and
the performance, the group suc-
cumbed late Thursday night.
THE YELNATS QUARTET was
formed last fall to fullfill the de-
gree requirements of Ed Troupin,
Don Miller, Ted Powell and Har-
riet Risk. All were due to gradu-
ate this year.
The-four had previously play-
ed together in various school or-
chestras. After searching vainly
for a name, the group finally ap-
plied the Serutan formula to
the name of a famous faculty,
string quartet.

* * * *

Athletic Plant Grows
Co peing Prjecs '...
For Golf,_Baeal
A lot of old timers won't recognize the University athletic plant
when the 'M' Club assembles for its annual reunion, June 3.
Things have changed quite a bit since the last 'M' Club shindig.
A new tier of seat has been added to the football stadium and the
hockey rink has been .rebuilt.

AND at the present time, workmen are putting the finishing
touches on the two latest projects in the Athletic Department's $6,000,-
000 expansion program - the remodeled baseball stands and the
new golf center.
The new steel and concrete baseball stands are located on the

-Daily-Wally Barth
GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN-Flowers and weeds adorn the
tombstones of the Yelnats String Quartet in front of Burton
Memorial Tower. The group, formally composed of graduate
members in the School of Music, succumbed Thursday night
following a recital. Faculty members and fellow students have
been paying homage to the quartet ever since the interment.

The Yelnats' first big chance
came when they were asked to sub-
stitute at a concert in Grand Ra-
pids. As a result of their success
subsequent engagements were held
in Trenton and Ann Arbor.
* * *
NOTED as pranksters in the
musical profession, the quartet at-
tained reknown through its con-
struction of a 10-foot violin bow.
In a class recital two of the group
pushed the bow while a third
plucked the strings.
The bow is now hanging in
the office of Prof. Gilbert Ross,
'U' Professors
CompileBook
A. collection of European docu-
ments, source materials for poli-
tical science students, has been
compiled by five political science
professors, and will be released
soon.
"Source Book in European Gov-
ernments" was compiled by Prof.
James Pollock, Prof. Lionel Laing,
Prof. Samuel Eldersveld, Prof.
James Meisel and Manfred Vernon.
It includes recent constitu-
tions, decrees, party platforms
and election statistics of Britain,
France, Italy, Russia and Ger-
many.
A special feature of the book is
p .translation of the 1936 Rus-
sian constitution, by Prof. Meisel,
brought up to date by decrees of
government and party organs.
DINNER DATES by
Thomas
* s4
4. I+
- .1
4 ARIBSw Ufflo. 9EC

* *

&

* * *

of the music school, as a mem-
orial to the ingenuity and pio-
neer spirit of the Yelnats.
In an attempt to gain momen-
tary public notice the quartet had
a rubber stamp made bearing its
title in Old English type. Every
score the group has performed
and the programs of every con-
cert in which it appeared are in-
delibly stamped with "Yelnats."
* . * *
BEING PUBLIC SPIRITED, the
quartet carried on a campaign
against crime by sending letters
urging reform to students suspect-

ed of borrowing music stands
from the University. Preferring
to remain anonomyous and escape
public gratitude, the musicians
signed the letters with the names
of various professors.
Through this campaign, and
by bringing back to their tea-
chers from their off-campus
concerts such presents as a live
skunk, a tulip and toilet water,
the f o u r fiddlers endeared
themselves to the music school
faculty.

They are survived
ley Quartet.

by the Stan-

.

same site that the old wooden 't
ones used to fill in the center of1
Ferry Field.
And while some of the diehard
oldtimers might not like the loss
as some of the old tradition, the
new stands are more functional,
better looking, and more com-
fortable for both fans and play-
ers.
THE OLD wooden structure had
become an eyesore, according to
baseball coach Ray Fisher. But
the new stands that greet the
spectator as first approaches the
park are as fine as any college
park in the country.
The new stands were built
to hold 3000 fans, the same num-
ber that the old park seated.
The first several rows of the
stands aresbleacher seats for
those who like to sit in the
sun, but others who prefer the
shade can find regular seats un-
der the protection of the roof.
Fans are also closer to the ac-
tion on the diamond in the new
stands, as the distance from
home plate to the stands has been
cut from 90 feet to 60 feet.
* * *
ANOTHER accommodation for
the spectator which will not ap-
pear until next spring is a new
scoreboard to replace the old
wooden one along the right field
foulline.
Spacious concrete dugouts.
have been installed for the bene-
fit of the players, and work is
still going on underneath the
stands on, a lockerroom for vis-
iting players.
This will save them the trouble
of shuttling back and forth to the
I-M Building to dress.
The finishing touches are still
being applied to the stands, but
when the park is fully completed
it will present an appearance be-
fitting the Michigan tradition,
athletic officials boast.
* * *
OUT AT THE University's
championship golf course, con-
struction workers are rushing the
finishing touches on the $225,000
Golf Service Building, in an effort

PERFECT
for
Rayon Crepe Pajamas
Ensemble
Blue and,
Chartreuse-Combi nation
Brown and Aqua
Sizes 12-14-16
1 095
3 Quarter-Length
Coat
8 Nickels Arcade

to have it ready for the 'M' Club
function.
The structure replaces a fra-
gile wooden shack which has
served as the starting point
through which the school's
links enthusiasts have patiently
alked for years. w
Its main equipment as a cash
register and a cooler for soft
drinks.
BY CONTRAST, the new club
house is one which would make
most country clubs envious. It
includes provisions for a spacious
lounge and snack bar in addition
to a golf shop.
Locker and shower room fa-
cilities of the latest design will
vastly improve golfing condi-(
tions for students. There will be
250 men's lockers as well as 50
for women. Practice nets in the
basement are also a part of cur-
rent plans.
On the building's second floor
is a group of 11 rooms which will
be used mainly as temporary liv-
ing quarters by the athletic de-
partment. The setup is the an-
swer to a big problem for Wolver-
ine football coaches.
* * *
THE UNIT will be used to house
Michigan athletic team members
on the night before a contest. It
is also tailor-made for other rec-
reational 'activities and possibly
for housing visiting sports groups.
Added details are an apartment
for the caretaker and an attractive
terrace for social events border-
ing the porches.
Michigan's golf teams will
now have an adequate base on
which to build title contenders,
and the students have gained a
vastly more serviceable club
house.
If conditions permit, the sport3
expansion will continue with the
erection of two more buildings in
the near future.
One will be devoted to the phy-
sical education program for men
and will be located somewhere in
the general area of Ferry Field.
The other is a proposed center
for women's sports activities.

SPECTATOR ENTRANCE OF NEW BASE BALL STANDS AT FERRY FIELD

VIEW OF BASEBALL STANDS FROM OUTFIELD DURING BATTING PRACTICE
t

A

DAILY

PHOTO
FEATU RE
Story by
Harold Tanner and
Ted Papes
Pictures by
Ed Kozma

a *
r , "
* t

BASEBALL COACH RAY FISHER AND EX-WOLVERINE CHAT
IN NEW DUGOUT

I don't know which track No. 7
puiis in on . . . but I do know
that the Allenel is the best place
to eat!"
ALLENEL DINING ROOM

ii

_I I

"

1

IN ANN ARBOR
508 E. William St.
-CAMPUS Music CENTER"
for Everything Known in
MUSICAL GRADUATION GIFTS
RECORDS
Encores, First Piano Quartet, 45 rpm., WDM 1263. $3.51
Tchaikowsky, Symphony No. 5 in E Minor, Boston Symphony Orchestra
with Serge Koussevitsky, 45 rpm., WDM 1057. $6.51
Brahms, Symphony No. 3 in F Major, Philadelphia Orchestra with
Eugene Ormandy, 33 1/3 rpm., ML 4088. $4.85
Gaite Parisienne, Offenbach, Boston "Pops" Orchestra, 333 rpm.,
LM 1001. $4.85
MUSIC ACCESSORIES

A

PAINTERS WORK ON MAIN FLOOR LOUNGE OF GOLF BUILDING OVERLOOKING COURSE

GOLF BUILDING WOODWORK GETS VARNISH COAT

Metronomes, electric. $15.00 and $16.00. Seth Thomas.

$10.95

Director's stands, Hamilton. $12.50

Pir
s,; r i
ME

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