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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 24, 1950 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TfIRE MUI iAN- 1DAILY

Clink Will
Direet Study
Of Heredity
Pairing up of males and females
in American cities will be of top
interest to the Heredity Clinic for
the next five years, thanks to a
$100,000 gift from an anonymous
donor.
The research program, to be
directed by Dr. Lee R. Dice, head
of the Heredity Clinic, will be to
study human mating selection in
the urban community.
* * *
IT IS SLATED to get underway
in the middle of September, Dr.
Dice announced.
The unknown donor's grant
will finance the entire project,
which will be set up as a sepa-
rate section of the Institute of
Human Biology, the newly-ap-
proved name for the laboratory
effective July 1.
"The purpose of the research is
to determine, assortative mating
patterns in the city," Dr. Dice ex-
plained, "or to explore the ten-
dency of like persons to mate with
like."
"THE RESULTS of this pro-
gram will be an aid in predicting
the trends of population in here-
dity in future years," he said.
"We will have to develop new
techniques of study to carry on
this program," Dr. Dice said,
"which promises to be the most
extensive of its kind yet under-
taken." A random sampling of a
city population will probably be
used for the investigation, ac-
cording to Dr. Dice, with Ann
Arbor tentatively designated as
the sample community.
Petitions Due
For WSSF Jobs
Petitions for the 12 committee
chairmanships of the World Stu-
dent Service Fund drive are now
available at the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs and Lane Hall.
The positions include general
chairman, vice-chairman, secre-
tary, treasurer, Student Legisla-
ture and Student Religious Asso-
ciation representatives, and chair-
knen of the following committees:
blood drive, fund drive, dormi-
tories, houses, program, and pub-
licity.
Continuous from 1 P.M.
Last Times Today -

Filming in Berlin

.. ,.
"-""

er

BUSINESS
SERVICES

-Courtesy Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
BERLIN MOVIE MAKERS-The crew of "The Big Lift," which was produced at the request of the
Air Force, prepares to shoot a scene amid the ruins of Berlin. Since only a minimum of Hollywood
equipment could be brought, the camera mount was devised from a dentist's chair and baby carriage
wheels. Director George Seaton stands at right; his wife, Phyllis Seaton, '28, third from right.
*e e * * * * * *
ProblesBestBri oi imn
---

SYLVIA STUDIO of Dance - Ballroom,
Tap, Acrobatic, Ballet. Over Michi-
gan Theater. Phone 8066. )9B
WANTED-Laundry to take in. Very
reasonable? Call 2-9494. )35B
SHIRTS - Nine hour service (by re-
quest), three day service (regular ser-
vice). Ace Laundry, 1116 S. Univer-
sity. ) 7B
VIOLA STEIN-EXPERIENCED TYPIST
-Master's and Doctor's manuscripts
and legal work. Phone 2-9848 after
noon. )30B
rYPEWRITER3 AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales and Service
MORRILL'S-314 S. State St. )11B
DELICIOUS hardy picnic lunches for
groups numbering fromr25 to 1,000
persons. Let us take care of all the
details. We deliver. J. D. Miller Ca-
tering service. 2-8315 phone. )13B
HILDEGARDE SHOPPM -
109 E. Washington
Expert Alterations
Custom Clothes
by Established Tradition )3B
WASHING, ironing done in my own
home. Also rough dry and wet wash-
ing. Free pick up and delivery. Ph.
2-9020. )1B
EAVE YOUR typewriter repaired by the
Office Equipment Service Company.
215 E._Liberty. )_4_
VACATION DAYS will soon be here.
Mother and Dads-enjoy yourselves.
Responsible sitters for the children.
CallKiddieKare 3-1121. )10B
4 FOR SALE
ANY TYPE Foot Locker - $7.99, $9.99,
$10.99 al taxes included; Army type
duffle bags $2.99; Furlough bags $2.49
with zipper; Open til 6 p.m. Samns
Store,_ 122 E. Washington. )5_
A $10 STEAL. White double-breasted
shawl collar DINNER JACKET. 36
Med. Bob , Wagner, 2-4274, after 7.
)177
AMERICAN Radiator Gas Furnace
unit and thermostat. $100. Phone
25-7881.
)178
LIGHT WEIGHT Motorcycle Harley
125, excellent condition. Reasonable
Price. Jim Trumbo 2-7303 after 7
p m .. R~)1 7 9
MOTORCYCLE - 1940 Indian, 74,
Good condition, call 5806 after 7
p.m. -- - - --. .180
i93 FORD, runs good. New top, bat-
tery. $55. Ph. 9879 )181
200 SETS of 78 r.p.m. records, like new,
from private collection, mostly be-
low ?2 list. Unusual bargains. Many
rare and new items, also a few LP's
and 45's. 118 N. Thayer, Apt. 2. Tel.
2-9185. _ )182
BICYCLES-Men's Schwinn lightweight
$20. Girl's Elgin $30. Phone 3-0275.
)175
GOLF SET-Ralph Guldahl autograph-
ed matched clubs. 5 irons. 2 woods,
brand new, never used. Price $29.95
Ph. 2-8692. )171
MOTORCYC LISTS !
If you are interested in a motorcycle,
you should see these before you buy.
They are priced right. India M/C
Sales, 207 W. Liberty. Ph. 2-1748.
Open evenings. )170
Read Daily Classifieds

FOR SALE
1938 PACKARD SEDAN-Radio, heater,
new tires, battery, muffler, and
shocks. 2-2080. )168
MUST SELL-'37 Chrysler Imperial.
Clean, sound and solid throughout.
Good tires, htr., overdrive. Lots of
room for that trip home. $130.00. Call
2-4591, 304 Prescott. )173
ALL COLOR PARAKEETS, Canaries,
Finches, Cocketiels. Bird supplies and
cages. 562 S. 7th. Ph. 5330. )2B
1949 ENGLISH FORD FORDOR - A-1
condition new last August, low mile-
age. Priced for quick sale. See any
evening at 615% W. Huron or Satur-
day and Sunday. Phone 2-8770. )148
WOMAN'S riding boots size 81z. Ex-
cellent condition. Phone 8539 after
5:00.- )80
CUSHMAN SCOOTER 1950. Auto trans-
mission. Used three weeks. Wind-
shield, speedometer. Priced to suit.
Call 3-4592. )126
DIAMOND engagement and wedding
rings. Large discount. Jay Angle,
wholesale representative. Ph. 2-4481.
)9 .
TRANSPORTATION
A
WANTED - 3 riders to Chicago, north-
side, leaving Friday. Call 2-0673 after
5 p.m. )29T
DESIRE ride ao Mexico City after June
17, share expenses and driving. Call
Mary 9388. )30T
FLYING (Commercial) TO BOSTON-
Early July? May our three-year old
ride with you? Remuneration, of
course. Ph. 2-6221. _____ )28T
FLYING TO CALIFORNIA June 8.
Have 2 seats, $75 each. McElroy Fly-
ingService, 9335. )27T
ALASKA TRIP in 1950 Chevrolet Su-
burban carryall. Want 2 or 3 passen-
gers, references. Leave about May 20.
For information, call Detroit T080376
about 6 p.m. )26T
PERSONAL
TO THE MEMBERS OF FIJI:
Crying in our beer are we.
Since Sunday our mugs you took.
We can't give our books a look.
Please return our mugs so fancy.
Two tearful coeds-Suzie and Nancy.
) 77P
STUDENT RATES on TIME and LIFE
still available. Only $4.75 a year.
Through Student Periodical Agency.
Phone 2-82-42. )2
NOW IS THE TIME!
Get your room for this summer or
next fall now! ! You will get very
satisfactory results from a cheap,
efficient DAILY CLASSIFIED AD.
2-3241. )2P
STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY
Never advertises on Sundays. 2
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
209 S. State
Phone 8161 )iP
SENIORS-Your last chance to take
advantage of the Student rates on
TIME and LIFE. Only $4.75 a yr.
Phone Student Periodical Agency,
2-82-42. )2
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
MEDICAL PERSONNEL
for medical and dental field.
408 Park Ave. Bldg. WO 3-5789
DETROIT, MICHIGAN )1E

, :
.
.
:r
,

HITCHHIKER leave a green plastic
raincoat in your car? Pleasecall
Ypsi 792-M. Thanks. )150L
LOST ==-": May 17, Man's horn-rimmed
glasses, brown leather case. Reward
Call . Rellenga, 2-0070.
)106L
LOST -':'Parker '51 Pen. Silver and
blak. Call Room 309, Cooley E.Q.
2-4591: Reward. }107L
LOST-Bunch of keys near Groomwell
Beauty Shop or vicinity of State St.
Ph. 5896 or 5126. )98L
LOST--Black and pink rim glasses. Ap-
ril 25th, campus. Ph. 3-1561-4506
Palmer Hse. )85L
LOST-Racine wristwatch with metal
band. Call 250611. )64L
WANTED TO RENT
THREE ROOM FURNISHED APT, by
graduate student and working wife.
Must have private bath. Will be in
Ann Arbor at least 3 years. Write T.
D. Kowalski, 9205 A St., Apt. 11,
Hayward Calif. )30N
WANTED TO RENT-Furnished kit-
chenette apartment for the Summer
Session. Graduate student and wife.
R. C. Davis, University of Akron,
Mathematics Department, Akron, O.
)15N
WANTED-TO-SUB-LET: Wife and hus-
band, both teachers, desire to sub-
letnapartment for summer school
session. Write Mrs. June D. Kelly,
Box 181, Galien, Mich. )11N
FOR RENT
FURNISHED-Near Law School. June 1
to July 25. $60. Ph. 2-0438. )36F
DOUBLE ROOMS, SUITES - Available
for men, summer session. Near cam-
pus and Union. Shower, continuous
hot water. $5.25. 509 S. Division near
Jefferson. )29F
FOR RENT-June 16 to Sept. 1-Small
apartment near campus. Reasonable
rent. 2-5269 after 4. )32N
ROOMS FOR RENT-Rooms for Sum-
mer School, $4 per week. Fraternity
House. Kitchen privileges. 514 E.
Univ. Corner of Hill. Phone 2-9341.
34F
WANTED TO TRADE
IF OUR TASTES AGREE, let's swan
classical record albums. 2-7981. )17'1

LOST & FOUND

HELP.WANTED
WANTED-Part time secretary-steno-
grapher for executive office. Hours to
be arranged. Dr. Rector. Phone 2-0978.
)23H
BOOKKEEPER WANTED - Permanent
position for bookkeeper to handle full
set of books, good salary, interesting
work. Interviews on 2nd floor Fol-
lett's Bookstore, 322 S. State. ) 18H
DO YOU need any help? If so, you will
get good results from a DAILY HELP
WANTED ad. Try it and see. )7P
ROOMS
FOR RENT
CLOSE TO CAMPUS-Large, pleasant
double room for male students, fall
or summer. No smoking. Phone 5372.
)82R.
COOL ROOMS for summer session for
mature men. 4 blocks from campus.
Twin beds, shower, cooking and laun-
dry privileges. Continuous hot water.
Shown Tues., 12:45 to 4:30. Fri. 9-4.
415 Lawrence. )83R
MEN-Inexpensive rooms for summer.
Some with bath. Call 2-2202. )80R
ONE SINGLE room. Man preferred.
2-4239. 836 Brookwood Place. )79R.
PLEASANT singles & doubles for men.
Campus. Summer rates $5. Ph. 6876
evenings. )77R%
SUITE-Private bath. Private entrance.
Suitable for three men. 603 Lawrence.
) 76R
MEN'S ROOMS, summer and fall sin-
gles and doubles. 1346 Geddes, 2-7044.
ATTENTION MEN STUDENTS.-Secial
summer rates. Some fall reservations
available. Twin-bed rooms, air-con-
ditioned, showers, continuous hot
water. Unusually attractive accom-
modations, just three blocks off cam-
pus. Call 7632. )30F
MEN - Spend the summer in AIR
COOLED LUXURY. Carpeted rooms
with baths. TELEVISION. Sundeck.
Near campus. Kappa Nu Fraternity.
Phone 2-8809 or .2-8813. 81R
WANTED TO BUY
WANTED TO BUY--Small house for
occupancy by September. Write .john
Carnes, 3(Y7 N. State, Ann Arbor, or
phone 2-9483. 16W
MODEL A or B Roadster. Call 2-0227
Ask for Con. )17*

,A

By JOHN DAVIES
The Russians and the weather
were only two of many reasons
why writer-director George Seaton
had a difficult time filming "The
Big Lift," which is currently be-
ing shown in Ann Arbor.
Seaton, who won an "oscar" for
his screenplay of "Miracle on 34th
Street," spent over nine months
in Berlin making the picture with
a crew of only 12 Americans.
WITH THE EXCEPTION of
Paul Douglas and Montgomery
Clift, the actors were either air
force personnel, German civilians
or German actors, Seaton explain-
ed in a recent West Coast inter-
view.
Judd To Speak
At Round Table
Mrs. Dorothy Judd will speak
on "A Citizen-Action Program -
Grand Rapids as an Example,"
before the Political Science Round
Table at 7:30 p.m. today in the
Rackham Amphitheater.
Long active in Grand .Rapids'
civic affairs, Mrs. Judd organized
a Citizen-Action group two years
ago which is credited with run-
ning machine politics out of the
Grand Rapids city government.
The meeting will be open to the
public.

The Russians proved to be a
nuisance in several ways.
"While we were shooting a scene
at the border of the Russian zone,
they set up loudspeakers and
played music all day, forcing us
to shoot the scene silently and
add sound to the picture later,"
Seaton complained.
* * *
AND THE Russian-inspired rail-
road strike forced Seaton, his wife,
two small children fnd the crew
to wait in a railroad car for over
72 hours before finally arriving in
Berlin. The run usually took about
six hours.
The weather proved a big hin-
drance to Seaton and his crew.
"Often we would get all our
equipment set to make a certain
shot and it would be too cloudy -
or in some cases too sunny - to
get what we wanted," Seaton ex-
plained.
LANGUAGE problems were an-
other headache to Seaton.

"When we first arrived in Berlin.
we had a very incompetant in-
terpreter and assistant directors
who didn't understand English.f
This resulted in the German ac-
tors being told to do the wrong
thing more often then not," Sea-
ton said.
"Eventually, the situation was
cleared up by getting a better in-
terpreter," he added.
* * *
TYPICAL of many of the small-
er problems which arose was the
fact that crowds would gather
every time shooting was attempt-
ed on what should have been an
empty street.
"We solved the problem by using
the old trick of setting up a dummy
camera, complete with an active
'cameraman,' at the other end of
the street to divert the attention
of the crowd," Seaton explained.
"Then, of course, we set up an
inconspicuous camera to do the
real shooting," he added.

featuring
BREAKFAST, LUNCH
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prepared by
ANN ARBOR'S WELL KNOWN
CHEF FOR 30 YEARS
VIRGIL LANG
DAILY STUDENT SPECIAL
to fit your budget
Open: 7:00 A.M. to 7:30 P.M.
Closed Sundays
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LIBERTY
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STARTS TODAY
Thru Friday

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(PAID ADVERTISEMENT)
THE REAL STORY

,itk Fuzz KNIGHT' Raymond HATTON AI : 1 / 1
Added Cartoon "PAYING THE PIPER"

'

THE ANN ARBOR DRAMA SEASON
NOW PLAYING
John Alexander, John Morgan in
"BORN YESTERDAY"
By Garson Smith
with SCOTT McKAY and CARROL ASHBURN
Curtain 8:30
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATER

1

i

* NOTE SCHEDULE "

INTHE
FLESH
A PAUL GRAETZ PRODUCTION

ENDING TODAY

M"G' PICTURE
with CYD CHARISSE-" NANCY DAVIS
* PLUS *

i

-i a Vif

"This film is plainly for
starting impassioned
discussion. For not
only does it have
forebearance for the
youthful principles in
an adulterous romance,
but it lays bare the
merciless irony in
certain conventional
attitudes. Perhaps the
finest, most mature
picture from post-war
France."
-Bosley Crowther,
N.Y. TIMES
Fri. and Sat., at 8 P.M.

I

Like all of our basic freedoms, freedom of ex-
pression is precious to us beyond calculations. A
measure of the sincerity with which it is cherished is
the care with which it is treated. That care must
necessarily involve decency, dignity, good taste, high
moral purpose and above all, responsibility. When
that "freedom" is perverted by a failure to distinguish
it from corruption, infamy, slander and lies, it be-
comes transformed into its very opposite: license.
A democratic society has its responsibilities as
well as its freedoms. The Student Legislature assumed
none of the democratic responsibility of exercising dis-
cretion, when, without any investigation at all on its
part, it approved by a small majority the showing of
the film Birth of a Nation.
HAD THEY INVESTIGATED THE BACK-
GROUND AND CONTENT OF THIS FILM,
THEY WOULD HAVE FOUND THAT AC-
CORDING TO BOTH ITS WRITER (Rev. Thomas
Dixon, author of "The Clansmen" from which the
movie was taken) AND ITS PRODUCER (D. W.
Griffith), THE SOLE PURPQSE OF THE FILM'
WAS TO "CREATE A FEELING OF ABHOR-
RENCE IN WHITE PEOPLE TOWARD COLOR-
ED MEN."
Had they investigated, they would have found
that the film "identified Negroes with cruelty, super-
stition, insolence, and lust. It judged the Negro
unfit for freedom and civil rights and argued that
his liberation was a grave error." At one point it
bluntly editorialized that the South must be made
"safe" for the whites.
Had they investigated, they would have found
that the film thrillingly and gloriously justified the
rise of the Ku Klux Klan, which was "deified as the
savior of white womanhood."
Had the Student Legislature investigated before
making a rash and unpardonable decision, they would
have discovered that the producer-director, D. W.
Griffith, "employed every resource of movie magic
to stimulate his audiences to frenzied hatred of the

often advertised as "calculated to whip
into a frenzy . . . it will make you hate.

* * * *
Ever since the film's appearance in 1915, the
National Association for the Advancement of Colored
People, representing 15,000,000 and more Americans,
has been waging a ceaseless struggle to have this
vicious and insulting film withdrawn from circula-
tion. At this very moment in New York City, the
NAACP, the Urban League, The National Council
of Arts, Sciences and Professions, Labor unions,
Civic organizations, Church groups; all are staging
a mass protest against the recent re-release of this
picture.
'Walter White, a recognized leader among the
Negro people, has stated: "It is inexplicable why any-
one should revive a film like "The Birth of a Nation"
at this critical period of human history. During recent
months in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Europe,
I have seen American prestige sinking lower and
lower because of the foul propaganda of pictures like
Birth of a Nation.' No decent theater owner who
has any regard for the future of America would show
such a film nor should any decent American pay
money to see it."
We at the University of Michigan are at this
moment in a position of immense moral responsibility.
To withdraw the film now, once and for all, is to serve
notice to the entire nation that we, student and faculty,
Negro and white, Protestant, Catholic, and Jew stand
immovable in our complete rejection and repudiation
of all racist ideology in whatever form and under
whatever pretension it masquerades. To withdraw this
film is to prove that we are mature people, that we
understand fully our responsibility to democracy; that
we can intelligently distinguish between liberty and
license.
This would not simply be an act of good faith, a
hand of friendship extended to the Negro people; it
'is the profoundest service to the American People,
to their democratic institutions, and to those free-
doms, free from all taint of slander and insult, which

audiences

I. crhned On t ue ""'- j :1 #

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