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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 19, 1950 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-05-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

. . . ..........

THE MICHIGAN DAILY A

GROWING PAINS:
Colleges Need Continuity
In Leadership --- Jacobs

By PETER HOTTON
One of the great handicaps
to education of the past decade
has been the lack of continuity in
leadership, and as a result uni-
versities have gone off on tan-
gents of uncoordinated expansion,
according to Albert C. Jacobs, '21.
"Now they must take extra care
in further development to preserve
present educational standards,"
Jacobs, chancellor of the Univer-
sity of Denver, said in a Daily in-
terview yesterday.
.-Delay- South
QuadOpenting
Reversing previous plans, the
University has announced that
-the South Quadrangle of Mens'
Residence Halls will not open
this .fall.
According to James H. Robert-
son, Resident Director of the
West Quadrangle, the houses of
the new quad that were to have
been ready for occupancy in
September, will not be completed
by that time.
Those men who applied for
rooms at the South Quad will be
reassigned to other University
residence halls.
Frazer To Lecture
"The Mechanism of Fat Absorp-
tion" will be the topic of an ad-
dress by Dr. Alastair C. Frazer,
professor of pharmacology at the
University of Birmingham, Eng-
land, at 4:15 p.m. today in Kellogg
AAuditorium
The lecture will be held under
the auspices of the Bacteriology,
Biological, Chemistry and Phar-
macology Departments.
- -

"WE MUST carefully consider
what's to be done, by studying to
see in what areas we ought to
put our efforts," he declared.
Jacobs felt that universities
tried to do too much after the
war, and proposed devotion of
full efforts in the years ahead
to strengthen iiiose areas they
do retain, as a solution to pre-
sent problems.
The solution at the University'
of L'-enver, when Jacobs became
chancellor last fall, was to set up
a survey committee to see what
it should build, expand, improve
or encourage.
"WE WILL call in a leading
educator of the nation to help us
decide what. to do with the re-
sults, he declared.
It's easier to expand than to
pull in your horns, he added.
The University of Denver enroll-
ment is about 10,000 - slightly
higher than Jacobs hopes it to be
in the near future.
* * *
FIRST THINGS come first, ed-
ucational institutions have had
to provide for the great influx of
veterans, and they did very well,
Jacobs said.
The way the veterans have
taken the expansion and confu-
sion has been commendable, he
added.
After graduating from the Uni-
versity of Michigan in 1921, Ja-
cobs studied and taught for six
years at Oxford University as a
Rhodes Scholar.
* * *
FROM 1927 to 1949 he was at
Columbia University as professor
of law and assistant to President
Eisenhower, with four years off
as Director of the Dependence
Welfare Division of the navy,
where he worked both in the Pa-
cific and Washington.
He left Columbia last fall to
become head of Denver, the only
privately - owned, independent
university between the Missis-
sippi and the Sierras.
"One of the reasons I was re-
luctant to leave Columbia was
that President Eisenhower w)s
so good to work with," Jacobs de-
clared.
Editors Appointed
Theodore Sachs, '51L, has been
appointed editor-in-chief of the
student editorial board of the Mi-
chigan Law Review for 1950-51.
Associate editors are: Walter
Dean, '51L; B. J. George, Jr., '51L;
Thomas Hartwell, '51L; Gordon
Hueschen, '51L; and Willis Smell,
'51L.

The
City Beat
Ann Arbor township has asked
the circuit court to throw out the
four annexations voted into the
city at the April 3 elections.
The township claims that an er-
ror was made which serves to void
the annexations. According to Ar-
thur Lehman, township attorney,
the annexations were made under
the assumption that Ann Arbor is*
a special charter city, while in re-
ality it is a fourth class city with
no power to annex in this manner.
The differences in annexation
proceedings between fourth class
and special charter (Home Rule)
cities concern the groups who vote
on the proposals.
In Home Rule cities, the Board
of Supervisors merely calls an
election. The combined vote of the
city and township involved and
another vote of the residents of
the area affected determines
whether or not the annexation will
be made.
In fourth class cities, the Board
of Supervisors and the residents of
the affected area vote on the pro-
position. No other' group votes.
Ann Arbor City Attorney Wil-
liam Laird has answered by as-
serting that Ann Arbor is a special
charter city, entitled to annex un-
der the "Home Rule Act."
Washtenaw County took its
stand alongside the city yesterday,
denying that any error had been
made.
The four annexations are the
Miller Rd.-Newport Rd., Stadium-
Washtenaw, Gowans, and Tuomy-
Londonderry parcels.
* * *
The Ann Arbor City Council
has voted in favor of a thirty-
day trial of one-way traffic on
parts of East University Ave. and
Church St.
James E. Cline, '53E, 377 Cooley
House, East Quad, was struck by a
car, driven by Warren R. Staebler,
late yesterday morning.
He was taken to Health Service
with injuries to his head, left leg
and hip.
. * * *
James Simensen, '52E, 21 years
old, pleaded guilty in Municipal
Court to the charge that he had
"furnished alcoholic liquors to a
person under the age of 21 years."
Judge Francis O'Brien fined
Simonsen $50 plus costs of $4.90
for violating the City of Ann Arbor
liquor ordinance.
IFC Exchange Job
Petitions for assistant manager
of the Interfratrnity Council book
exchange are now being accepted
at the IFC office in the Union,
according to Bob Vogt, '51E, presi-
dent.

By BOB SOLT'
Instead of worrying about the
Spring fever that's bothering you,
start doing some serious thinking
about poison ivy, sprained ankles,
sunburn, mental fatigue, and pos-
sibly even drowning.
The basis for all this advice is
a warning by Dr. Forsythe, Health
Service Director, who said yester-
day that-coming exams combined
with warm, sunny weather is the
cause of much unnecessary stu-
dent misery.
"DURING THE next few weeks,
we expect that quite a few indis-
reet students will come to the
Health Service with painful cases
of sunburn, or else with poison ivy
caught while walking in the Arb
or other nearby outdoor places,"
Dr. Forsythe warned.
"In addition, before this se-
mester is over, it wouldn't sur-
prise us at all if one or two stu-
dents were drowned while swim-
ming, in nearby lakes," he de-
cared.
But before the perennial desk-
sitter heaves a sigh of relief, there
is one more ailment that will pla-
gue almost every student even if
he doesn't so much as lift a finger
-mental fatigue or other emotion-
al worries.
"WITH 'PAY DAY' for students
at exam time only a few weeks
away, they begin to get anxious
and worry a little more," Dr. For-
sythe said.

"Partly accounting for this
type of health problem are sen-
iors who have not been able to
find permanent jobs as yet, orf
by other students who are con-
cerned about summer work or
returning to school in the Fall."
But on the brighter side, Dr.
Forsythe had a word of comfort
for those students who turn "book-
worm" at this time of the year and
are worrying that college studies
are ruining their eyesight.

"While we don't have factual in-
formation collected to supply facts,
it is doubtful that students harm
their eyesight more while in col-
lege than they usually might else-
where," he said.
Asked what he thought of pitch-
ing pennies as a summer sport, Dr.
Forsythe said he thought it was
reasonably safe-as long as you
don't sprain your back or 'ruise
your finger while picking up the
pennies.

EXAMS, SUN TO TAKE TOLL:
Ills Expected To Mark Spring's Coming

'U

Student Pilgrimage to Europe
Treat the June graduate to a pilgrimage to

ROME (the Holy City), PARIS,
FLORENCE and other famous cities
$521 to $572 no ups!

Ak 5
no

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.

-Daily-Alan Reia
MICHIGANENSIAN-Clarence Kettler, '51 (front) and Dave
Shuart, '50 'Ensian business managers new and old, look over a
few of the 2700, 1950 yearbooks which will be distributed today
at the student publications building.
S* *
Distribution of 'EnmS ians
To Begin This Morning

Three 39 day itineraries sailing from Newyork
June 23-$541 to $572. Also three 36 deny itin -_
eraries sailing August 6-$521 to $552. All -
expenses. Age limit-16 to 35 years.
Including tour escorts, round trip on S.S. Liguria (formerly (S.S.
Capt. Marcos), transportation in Europe, hotels (including taxes
and tips), meals, sightseeing, entrance fees, etc. Special Papal audi-
ence in Rome. Chaplains or moderators accompany tours.
Sponsored by
NATIONAL FEDERATION OF CATHOLIC COLLEGE STUDENTS
and
NEWMAN CLUB FEDERATION
Number of accommodations is limited so write or wire for Iiteratnre,
information and applications
INTERNATIONAL CATHOLIC TRAVEL COMMITTEE
39 West 55th Street, New York 19, N. Y.
(All prices quoted above include ev'ery expense of the entire trlpj

mc a

PORTRAITS

SS s ,i

and
GROUP
PHOTOGRAPHS
am er ti
208 Mich. Theatre Bldg.
Phone 2-2072

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Dignified 'Ensian editors grunt-
ed and groaned yesterday as they
hauled 5,700 yearbooks into the
Student Publications Bldg.
The thousands of 'Ensians,
stacked half-way to the ceiling,
filled up the main conference
room of the building, forcing dis-
gruntled Daily and "Generation"
workers to seek other quarters.
SWEATING THE 'Ensians
Hillel To Hold
ReligionPanel
A comparison of the Judao-
Christian tradition with the Hindu
and Buddhist faiths will be the
subject of a world cooperation stu-
dent panel discussion, "East Meets
West," at 8:30 p.m. today at the
Hillel Foundation.
Moderator for the panel will be
Marilyn"Kqllenberg. Speaking for
the various religions will be Jerry
Chruch, Christianity; Herb Zaf-
ren, Judaism; Deba Dutt, Hindu-
ism; and Pat Arayasastra, Budd-
hism.
The discussion will follow regu-
lar Friday evening services which
begin at 7:45 p.m. A special invi-
tation has been extended to the
International Center.

through the last lap of their jour-
ney from Chicago was the climax
of a year's hard labor by the 1950
Michigenensian staff.
But the 12 months' toil will
be rewarded at 11 a.m. today
when the staff will begin dis-
tributing yearbooks to 5,300 pur-
chasers at the Student Publica-
tions Bldg.
'Ensians will be handed out from
11 a.m- to 5 p.m. today and 9 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. tomorrow, according
to Dave Shuart, '50, business man-
ager.

STUDENTS MAY pick up their
yearbooks by presenting their re-
ceipts or ID cards, Shuart said.
House representatives must
bring receipts to claim year-
books, Shuart added.
"Four-hundred 'Ensians will go
on sale Monday at the Student
Publications Bldg. and at local
book stores," he said.Y2
Shuart concluded. "It shouldbtake E W Y13 rs.55 min.
each studently only about five (Rail Coach: $23.25- 2 hrs. 20 min.)
minutes to get his 'Ensian.
'Carmen' SlatedVWASHNGTON 2 hrs. 40 mm.
To Bein Today(Rail Coach: $20.07--14 hrs. 35 min.)
Equally fast flights ... equally low fares to Minneapolis,
"Carmen La De Triana," the St. Paul, Milwaukee, Chicago, Pittsburgh and Cleveland
only Spanish movie production of (All fares plus federal tax)
"Carmen" will be presented today
and tomorrow in the Architectur- In DETROIT:
FOR RESERVED SEAT TICKETS: 1203 Washington Blvd. & General Motors
al Auditorium. Building Concourse or your travel agent. For Air Travel
Produced in Mexico with Span- ANYWHERE in the World, Call WOodward 3-8900
ish actors, the picture has English
sub-titles. Under the joint spon- 0
sorships of the Art Cinema League PER
and the Sociedad Hispanica, the, .
movie will be presented at 7:30 4 T h p t a I ?
and 9:30 p.m. each evening.
Admission is free for members AowNt
of the Sociedad. Non-members
may purchase 50 cent admission
tickets in the League lobby today
and tomorrow.

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M4RILYN ------------

COLUMBIA RECORDS
Present
The Tops in Barber Shop Harmony
A NEW ALBUM by
THE CHORDETTES
Of Arthur Godfrey fame
Singing the good old favorites
WHEN YOU WERE SWEET SIXTEEN
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I'D LOVE TO LIVE IN,LOVELAND
SHINE ON HARVEST MOON
MOONLIGHT BAY - BA LLI N' TH E JACK
TELL ME WHY - WHEN DAY IS DONE
If you like close harmony, you'll like
HARMONY TIME
By the Chordettes
C 201 ... ... $3.95
"Hear The Hits On Columbia 7-in. LP . . . "Ploy auto-
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speed Costs less Superb LP Quality * No 'buttons' or

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QIP,

Won Je/ /

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SUITS
in Navy, White and many colors
Gentleman-Tailored by
KIRKLAND HALL in lifesav-
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Only

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Here's a fashion-flavored col-
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Hand-m"de buttonholes,
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Just Received.. Another Shipment of
PLAYCLOTH ES
SANDEZE . . . the suds-easy fabric for lazy
Summer days . . . needs no ironing . . .
made up in separates to mix or match .. .
in clear, vivid sunrise to sunset colors. In
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BRAS and HALTERS...........$1.75 to $3.95
SHORTS in 3 lengths.........$2.95 and $3.95
TENNIS SHORTS .....................$5.95
PEDAL PUSHERS .....................$3.95
SKIRTS.................... $5.00 and $5.95

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