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May 19, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-05-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIT MICHIGAN DAILY

Fl . UDAVI. MAt 19. WO

THE MICHa a iGAN DAHYti16 La 11 l

'~A1, 171'1 13} 10.7.I

u

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 4)
arranged by Louise Cuyler, Clari-
bel Baird, Jean Paul Slusser and
Maynard Klein, and covers high-
lights in the history of opera and
drama. The Tudor Singers will be
heard in L'Amfiparnasso by Vec-
chi, and excerpts from L'Orfeo by
Monteverdi; William P. Halstead
will direct scenes from Goldini's
"The Servant of Two Masters."
Open to the public without charge.
Composers' Forum under the di-
rection of Ross Lee Finney, 4:15
p.m., Mon., May 22, Rackham As-
sembly Hall. Leslie Eitzen, soprano,
and Digby Bell, pianist, will open
the program with Hindemith's
"Das Marien Leben," followed by
compositionsaby School of Music
students Jack Hoden, Edward
Troupin, Donald Scavarda and
Fred Truesdell. The publicais in-
vited.
Student Recital: Dawn Baldauf,
soprano, will present a program at
8:30 p.m., Mon., May 22, Archi-
tecture Auditorium, in partial ful-
fillment of the requirements for
the degree of Bachelor of Music.
It will include Italian, English,
German and French songs, and
will be open to the public. Miss
Baldauf is a pupil of Thelma Lew-
is.
Events Today
Canterbury Club: 4-6 p.m., Tea
and Open House for all students
and their friends.
Westminister Presbyterian Guild:
8:30 p.m. in Social Hall. Squirrel
Cage.
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-.
dent Club: Social at the Center at.

8:30 p.m. Dress for Square Dan-
cing.
Coffee Hour: 4:30-6 p.m., Lane
Hall Lounge. Dr. Harold Nash
Geistweit will be special guest.
Visitors' Night, Department of
Astronomy: 7:45 p.m., Angell Hall.
A special children's talk will be
given by Mr. William Liller in
3017 Angell Hall. At 8:30 p.m. Mr.
Liler will give a lecture entitled,
"Did the Sun Stand Still?" Follow-.
ing each talk the student obser-
vatory, fifth floor, Angell Hall,
will be open for observation of the
moon and Saturn with the tele-
scopes, provided the sky is clear.
Children must be accompanied by
adults.
Wesley Foundation: Senior Ban-
quet and Dance, 6:30-midnight.
Inter-Arts Union presents a Fes-
tival of Dance. Dance exhibit at
Rackham galleries all week. Friday
evening, in conjunction with Wo-
men's Physical Education Depart-
ment program by modern dance
and ballet club under direction of
Prof. Juana de Laban. 8:30, Pat-
tengill Auditorium. Tickets on sale
in Administration Bldg. Saturday
evening, a recital of modern dance
by the Dudley-Maslow-Bales trio,
world famous interpreters of
dance.
IZFA. Executive meeting, 4:15
p.m., Union. This year's and next
year's executive board should be
present. Delegates will be chosen
for the National Convention.
German Coffee Hour: 3:15-4:30
p.m., Michigan League Coffee Bar.
All students and faculty members
invited.

B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation:
Friday evening services at 7:45,
followed by an International Cen-
ter Evening Panel Discussion "East
Meets West". Saturday morning
services will be held at 9 a.m.
Museums Friday Evening Pro-
gram: Exhibits are open from 7 tc
9 p.m. Motion pictures: "Maya of
Ancient and Modern Yucatan"
and "Peru-P.eople of the Moun-
tains," 7:30 p.m., Kellogg Audi-
torium. Exhibit: "American Indian
Stimulants," Museums building.
Coing Events
Saturday Luncheon Discussion
Group: Saturday, 12:15 p.m., Lane
Hall. Dr. Harold Nash Geistweit
will be the guest speaker.
Army, Navy and Air Force ROTC
Units will hold "Open House" at
North Hall, between 10 a.m. and
3 p.m., Sat., May 20, in celebration
of Armed Forces Day. Instruction-
al equipment will be displayed;
Army, Navy and Air Force films
will be shown. The public is invit-
ed.
Army and Air Force ROTC stu-
dents report to Ferry Field at 6:30
p.m., Mon., May 22, for Annual In-,
spection Review or Parade.
Sports Night: IM Building, Sat.,
May 20, 7:30-10 p.m. All faculty
members, teaching fellows, wives,
children, and guests invited. Swim!
ming, squash, badminton, volley-
ball, and tennis. For further in-f
formation, phone Mrs. Sylvia Eite-
man, 5474.
U. of M. Hostel Club: Squarec
dancing every Saturday night fromt
8:15-11 p.m., Jones School. Ad-F
mission charge.
Recreational Swimming - Wo-r
men Students, at the Union Poola
every Saturday 9-11 a.m., throughF
May 27.
Pre - Medical Society: Picnic,l
Sat., May 20, 1:30-5 p.m. at the-
Island.
U. of M. Hostel Club: Sat., May
20. Wanted: 50 would-be artists r
to sketch pleasing farm scenery.
No experience necessary, techni-
cal assistance available from Dave
Smith. Meet at League at 10 a.m.
with lunch, stiff drawing board,
and any other drawing materials
you may have. Beginners may pur-
chase necessary supplies before o
group leaves by car for the Matthei c
Estate on Geddes Road. Phone o
John Amneus, 250075, by May 19.t
Museum Film D
The University Museums willt
feature "Some Indian Cultures of
the Western Hemisphere" in ex-v
hibits and motion pictures from t
7 to 9 p.m. today. C

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
TO APPEAR TONIGHT--Inez Miller, '50 E, and Jack Ledbetter
of the Ballet Club will participate in one of the dance routines
tonight in the opening performance of the Michigan Dance
Festival.
* * * * *
Tonight's Festival Show
To Star 'U' Dance Clubs

G

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bP'ALUINI7
UN WITEN APPLAUD c.(
714 TWIN
ChrMPHAMSHIPNSHIPI
STAND, uP T© ucLTrA a

3

The opening performance of the
first Dance Festival will feature
the Modern Dance ' and Ballet
Clubs in their annual Spring re-
cital at 8:30 p.m. today in Pat-
tengill Auditorium.
The groups are directed by
Prof. Juana de Laban of the wom-
en's physical education depart-
ment, and will be accompanied by
a special choir directed by Joyce
Edgar '50M.
*" * *
ACCORDING TO Prof. Oliver
Edel of the music school, thle
Celebr(ations
To Keynote
IilitaryDay
Talking to their friends over a
walkie-talkie, and watching mock
operations in the navigation and
control room of a destroyer will be
only two of the many things visi-
tors will be able to do Saturday
at the military "open house" at
North Hall.
As part of Ann Arbor's celebra-
tion of the nation's first annual
Armed Forces Day, the open house
will feature displays and exhibi-
tions by the Michigan National
Guard and the University ROTC
units.
* * *
ALONG WITH a display of
rocket launchers, machine guns,
and power telephones, the ROTC
Infantry will show the army's
new 'recoiler' rifle which ejects
half of the weapon's explosion out
of the rear of the rifle, allowing a
larger bullet to be used.
Models of airplane engines will
be shown by the Air Force unit,
and the Navy ROTC will display
torpedoes and other naval equip-
ment in addition to putting on
its demonstration.
In addition to the open house
that will be held from 10 a.m. to
3 p.m., the day's celebration will
include radio speeches, two flights
of 47 Navy planes flying over the
city, and dances at the local vet-
erans' clubs.

students of the Inter-Arts-Union
have sponsored this festival to
complete the whole circle of arts
on the Michigan campus.
"Although all these students
are not dancers, they believe
that dance should be exhibited
in Ann Arbor,
IAU members felt the lack of
dance so strongly that they were
willing to stake most of their
profits from the year on this
weekend's festival performances,
he explained.
* * *
"NO OTHER University-spon-
sored organization felt this need
strongly enough to do anything
about it," he declared,
Audiences will gain by viewing
this choreographic art because it's
much more provocative than the
chorus-line routines which can be
seen in other University produc-
tions, Prof. Edel continued.
"It's more alive than amuse-
ment-minded jazz," he said.
The final Festival performance
will be tomorrow night when the
Dudley-Maslow-Bales Trio from
the New Dance Group in New
York appears at 8:30 p.m. on the
stage of Pattengill Auditorium.
* * *
TICKETS FOR BOTH may be
purchased at the Administration
Bldg
Tonight's prices are 60 and 75
cents; tomorrow, 90 cents, $1.20
and $1.50.
Opera Scripts Due
June 1-- Ebersole
Scripts for next year's Union
Opera will be accepted until June
1, Jim Ebersole, '50, general mana-
ger o.f the 1950 opera, said yes-
terday.
The scripts need not be com-
plete, but should contain and iden-
tify all characters, include two di-
alogue scenes, a synopsis of the
plot, and spots for songs and pro-
duction numbers, he added.
"They may be turned in at the
main desk of the Union, or given
to me personally. The winning
script will be selected June 1," he
said.

First Place
Award Won
By WUOM
The University Broadcasting
Service has been awarded a first
place citation in the annual Am-
erican Exhibition of Educational
Radio Programs.
Announced at Columbus, Ohio,
the award was given to the pro-
gram-series, "Treasures Off the
Shelf" for ". . . catching and cap-
sulizing historical information in
a highly intelligent and effective
dramatic treatment for teen-age
and all-age listening groups."
* * *
SPONSORED BY the Institute
for Education by Radio, the award
was deemed "one of the most priz-
ed awards in educational radio" by
Prof. Waldo Abbot, director of
broadcasting at WUOM.
"Treasures" ran for 13 weeks
last fall and winter over WUOM
and more than 30 other stations
in Michigan. Each broadcast
dramatized the historical events
which had provided the back-
ground for the particular doct-
ment being used. The various
programs were prepared in col-
laboration with the staff of the
Clements Library.
"No individual can be singled out
to take credit for a radi show,"
Prof. Abbot remarked. "Apprecia-
tion is due, for example, to some
40 students who gave their time
and talents; to the entire staff
of the Clements Library for pro
viding the documents, and often
the story-line for the scripts; to
those staff members, technicians
and engineers, who 'put the pro-
gram on the air'; and, the Regents
and administrators whose fore-
sight provided the studios and
equipment."
* * *
WILLIAM BENDER, JR., of the
Broadcasting Service, wrote and
edited the series which were di-
rected by James Schiavone. Edwin
G. Burrows, in addition to writing
one program, established contact
with the 30-odd commercial sta-
tions which aired "Treasures".
"We have proved," continued
Prof. Abbot, "that radio drama is
one of the most effective educa-
tive mechanisms outside the class-
room itself."
Role of Bond
1 f M
Drive Noted
By Musgrave
The $650,000,000 national sav-
ings bond drive currently in pro-
gress probably has a two-fold pur-
pose, according to Prof. Richard
A. Musgrave of the economics de-
partment.
"In the next few years many of
the bonds sold during the war will
come due, and the new drive is a
means of replacement," he said.
Secondly, Prof. Musgrave ex-
plained that, while the govern-
ment was working on debt retire-
ment in previous years, this year
the administration expects a sub-
stancial deficit.
"The bond sales will allow the
government to place some of the
debt outside of the banks," he
declared, "as a means of meeting
part of the deficit."
The savings bonds campaign,
which was launched Monday by
the Treasury Department, is slated
to run through July 4. It has been
entitled the "Independence Drive "

According to 1949 monthly sales
figures, the $650,000,000 goal is lit-
tle more than sales would normally
run during the drive period.
The Treasury is putting out a
"trial balloon," according to
Prof. Musgrave. "The Depart-
ment usually tries to set its goal
at a reachable level," he said.
"Probably, if this drive is a suc-
cess, the goal for future bond
drives will be increased."
"Whether or not this is desire-
able, however, will depend on eco-
nomic conditions and future in-
ternational developments," h e
warned.

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