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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 09, 1950 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, M&I0

ELL' 15UMILES AWAY:

Stunt or Indians Name Nearby Town

' "I've been to Hell and back
again."
Lee Gordon, '52, has just return-
ed from Hell-, Michigan, a town
approximately 15 miles from Ann
Arbor.
* * *
THERE ARE two stock stories
concerning the origin of the town's
name which circulate around the
area.
One story gives the credit to
some mischievous boys who
played a stunt on Halloween.
It seems the town's only gaso-
line station had a big sign across
the road into Hel. Late Hallo-
ween evening about twenty years
ago, the first letter in the sign was
knocked out leaving a sign reading
NO ONE bothered to repair the
E ngineers To
Meet Today
A meeting of the Ann Arbor En-
gineer's Club will be held at 7:30
p.m. today in Rm. 3-G of the Un-
1on to discuss public health and
sanitation facilities in Ann Arbor
andt vicinity.
A panel will discuss the problems
of water purity and garbage dis-
posal in Ann Arbor.
Prof. Earnest Boyce, head of the
civil engineering department, will
serve as moderator of the dis-
cussion.
The panel will be composed of
Otto K. Engelke, Ann Arbor and
Washtenaw County Health Offi-
cer; George Sandenburgh, Ann Ar-
bor City Engineer; Louis Ayres,
consulting engineer; and Walter
Drury, consulting engineer.
Students Compete
For Debate Prizes
T h r e e scholarships totaling
$2,500 await the three winners of
a debate tournament today and
tomorrow at the Rackham Bldg.
Fourteen students will compete
in semi-finals today and finals
will be held at 4 p.m. tomorrow
The scholarship fund will be di-
vided into awards of $1,200, $800
and $600, and can be used for
paying expenses during the first
two years of study at a college of
the winner's choice.
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the Office of the
Assistant to the President, Room 255
Administration Building, by 3:00 p.m.
on the day preceding publcation
(11:00 a.m. Saturdays).
TUESDAY, MAY 9, 1950
VOL. LX, No. 149
Notices
Student Tea: President and Mrs.
Ruthven will be at home to stu-.
dents from 4 to 6 o'clock on Wed.,
may 10.
Important Notice to All Veter-
ans: All veterans enrolled under
the G. I. Bill are reminded of the
following Veterans Administra-
tion regulations: "(1) Those who do
not re-enroll in the summer ses-

sion will automatically receive
15 days leave beyond the end
of this semester. (2) Those who
re-enroll in the summer ses-
sion will automatically receive
leave payment for the time be-
tween the spring and summer en-
rollment periods. These leave per-
iods, which are deducted from eli-
gibility time, will be made AUTO-
MATICALLY unless the veteran
1 Ph. 5651
COMING FRIDAY
GREA\T
_s cj. WALTZ
A M-G-"M MASTRPE REP INT
TELEVISION NIGHTLY
Stop Here for

sign and for many years those who
passed through the town took it
for granted that it was named,
Hell.
The few inhabitants of Hell
liked the name and so they kept
the accidentally-found title.
The other story about "Hell"
goes back to the days of the cow-
boys and Indians.
* * * .
IN THOSE days the town had a
small store where people gathered

to talk and get supplies for the
journey west.
The Indians discovered that
all caravans stopped in this par-
ticular town and so they chose it
as their favorite raiding area.
In fact, it was raided so often
that caravans soon refused to "go
to Hell."
As the years passed and less
people dared to "go to Hell," the
name rubbed off and the people
thereafter were called inhabitants
of "Hell."

Nelson International House
Progresses Towards Goals

By DAVIS CRIPPEN
"It's been a long haul, but we've
just about got things squared away
in the house," Bill Miller, Grad.,
public relations chairman of the
Nelson International House said
yesterday.
The establishment, first of its
kind on campus and one of the
few in the country, moved in the
beginning of the semester to 915
Oakland, but before the men could
settle extensive changes had to be
made.
* * *
THROUGH ALL this time, Mil-
ler said, the men have been work-
ing at the real objective of a house
devoted to international living-
they've been getting acquainted
with each other.
Helping the get acquainted
program along has been the pol-
icy of national dinners. Under
it, on Saturday nights the men
from a particular country get
together and serve a meal typi-
cal of their native land.
So far the men from China,
Thailand, India, and last Satur-
day, Iran, have been chefs for a
day to the house.
"IF YOU'LL excuse my saying
so," Miller said with a sly grin,
"the men are wild about the idea.
In fact, they just eat it up."
Committee Meets
The Citizen's Committee for the
Hoover Commission Report will
hold its second meeting at 7:30
p.m. today in the Union.
The Committee will work on
campus with other organizations
to arouse student interest in the
Hoover Commission, according to
temporary secretary Len Wilcox,
'52.
notifies the Veterans Administra-
tion in writing prior to May 15
that he does not want leave. This
notice should be sent to: Veterans
Administration, 310 East Jeffer-
son Avenue, Detroit 32, Michigan.
Attention: 29R7AA.
Men's Housing Applications for
the Summer Session 1950: Men's
applications to live in the Resi-'
dence Halls for the Summer Ses-
sion 1950 are now being accepted.
Application blanks may be ob-
tained in the Office of Student
Affairs, 1020 Administration Bldg.
Students now enrolled at the Uni-
versity who are planning to con-
tinue for the summer, and those
admitted for the Summer Session
are eligible to apply.
IFC Sing: Fraternities or sor-
orities wishing to entertain fol-
lowing the Interfraternity Coun-
cil Sing on May 10 will be auth-
orized to do so provided chaper-
ons are listed in the Office of
(Continued on Page 3)

Besides the countries already
mentioned, there are six others
represented among the men in
the house: Turkey, Japan, Hol-
land, Norway, Brazil and the
United States.
As for admittance into the
house, Don Haskell, personnel di-
rector, explained that the process
is not complicated.
The applicants fill out a form,
which asks only their name and
address and why they want to get
in the house. Then the application
is passed on.
"Anyone, foreign or American,
who is interested in applying for
next fall," Haskell said, "can call
me at 3-8506."
Local Court
Fines Students
Municipal court fined four stu-
dents $179.05 over the weekend,
three on liquor charges and one
on a charge of reckless driving,
while a plea of mute was entered
for one student on liquor charges.
Daniel J. Buckley, 23 years old,
was fined $106-85 after pleading
guilty to a charge of driving un-
der the influence of liquor.
BRUCE COOK, 21 years old, was
fined $26.25 for furnishing two
University students, 18 and 19
years old, with beer for a weekend
canoeing trip.
A 20-year-old student, charg-
ed with being drunk and dis-
orderly, pleaded guilty and was
ined $16.85 by the court.
John E. Cline, '50Ed, 23 years
old, paid a total of $29.90 in
charges after pleading guilty to
reckless driving.
A 19-year-old student, charged
with using false identification to
obtain intoxicants, informed the
court that his parents had not
been notified of the charge. Judge
Francis O'Brien entered a plea of
mute for him and held the case
over until Saturday. The student

Acadenic
Rights Will
Be Debated
In an attempt to discover a
workable definition of academic
freedom suitable for times of ten-
sion, the Ann Arbor Federation of
Teachers has scheduled a public
service meeting to be held at 7:45
p.m. Thursday in the Unitarian
Church House.
Prof. A. K. Stevens, chairman
of the Teachers Federation locally
will preside over the discussion en-
titled "Academic Freedom in and
for a Free Society."
PARTICIPATING as discussion
leaders on various facets of the
topic will be Prof. William Fran-
kena, chairman of the philosophy
department, John Shepard of the
psychology department and Nor-
man Nelson of the English depart-
ment. -
Lewis Reimann, local civic and
business leader will also take
part in the discussion.
"It is high time somebody got
down to brass tacks in defining
academic freedom," Prof. Stevens
said recently.
* * *
"SOME TEACHERS think it
means only the right to regulate
window shades in the class room,
while others seem to think it is
an automatic guarantee of immu-
nity for intellectual hooliganism."
Question to be discussed at
the meeting include: Is academ-
ic freedom a luxury or a neces-
sity? Is absolute freedom possi-
ble? What are the responsibili-
ties of the teacher in a free
society? At what point does a
teacher become a subversive?
Prof. Stevens requested all
teachers, present and prospective
attend the meeting.
Life Members
Michigan Union life membership
cards may be picked up now at the
Union Business Office oi the
ground 'floor, according to Elsa M.
Staeb, bookkeeper.
The cards are available for men
who, by the end of this semester, -
will have been on campus and paid
full tuition for the equivalent of
eight full semesters as civilians.
Cards will not be mailed, she said.
Stason Will Speak
Dean E. Blythe Stason will
speak tomorrow in Chicago before
a group of University law school
graduates from that ain-a on
"Phoenix Project and the Law-
yer.
Read Daily Classifieds

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 58average words to a line
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
BUSINESS SERVICES
ACCURLATE TPY 'INC.~Reasonable rates.
Phone= 2-9437. )33B
SPRING ITEMS NOW IN-Nearly New
Clothing Shop, :311 E. Huron. Ph.
3-0166. Open 12-5:30, Sat. 10-5. )8B
SHIRTS Nine hour service (by re-
quest), three day service (regular ser-
vice). Ace Laundry, 1116 S. Univer-
sity. )7B
VIOLA STEIN -EXPERIENCED TYPIST
-Master's and Doctor's manuscripts
and legal work. Phone 2-9848 after
noon. )30B
rYPEWRI'rERS AND FOUN'AIN PENS
Sales and Service
MORRILL'S-314 S. State St. )11B
IIILDEGARDE SIIOPPE
109 E. Washington
Expert Alterations
Custom Clothes
by Established Tradition )3B
WASHING, ironing done in my own
home. Also rough dry and wet wash-
ing. Free pick up and delivery. Ph.
2-9020. ___)1B
HAVE YOUR typewriter repaired by the
Office Equipment Service Company.
215 E. Liberty. )4 _____
DOES JUNIOR keep you from going
out? Try a reliable Baby Sitter. Kid-
die Kare, 3-1121. )10B
HELP WANTED_
BOOKKEEPER WANTED -Permanent
position for bookkeeper to handle full
set of books, good salary, interesting
work. Intrviiws on 2nd floor Fs1-
het's Bookstore, 322 S. State. )18H
GIRL for part-time housework and
baby-sitting in exchange for room
and board in faculty home for sum-
mer or fall. Call 2-2009. )20H
DO YOU need any help? If so, you will
get good results from a DAILY HELP
WANTED ad. Try it and see. )7P
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR BOYS-Private entrances
and private baths. 603 Lawrence.
)71R
iVEN - lilt". pensive, comnfortable rooms
near calmui:fur summer, Call 2-2202.
)712R
MEN'S ROOMS, summer and fall, sin-
gles and doubles. 1346 Geddes, 2-7044.
_____-) 70R
CLEAN COMFORTABLE ROOMS for ad-
vanced men students, for, summer
and next year. Located 4 blocks from
campus. Kitchen and laundry privi-
leges. Shower and automatic heat.
Shown Tuesday 12:30-4:30 p.m., Fri.
9-4:15. 415 Lawrence, ) 69R
Movies are BETTER than ever!
E-LAST TIMES TODAY-I

FOR SALE

WILSON-Stainless-top notch registered
golfing irons, 1 yr. old. Ph. 2-3297,
Whittingham. )139
GOLF CLUBS-Ralph Guldahl matched
set. Brand new. 4 irons, 1 wood.
$21.95. Ph. 2-8692. )135
ARMY TYPE FOOTLOCKERS - $7.99,
$9.99, $10.99. Navy "T" shirts, 45c; Navy
type oxfords, $6.88; Levis $3.45. Open
'til 6 p.m. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington. __)5
1936 FORD-Body fair, motor and tires
good, seal-beam lights and new bat-
tery-$85._Call 3-1811 after 3 p.m. )140
FOR SALE - '40 Chrysler 4 dr., good
shape. Radio, beater, overdrive 1435
Harpst. Call _3-8410 evenings. )141
TWO JAPANESE SWORDS and one Jap
.23 calibre rifle. Cheap. Good con-
dition. Good souvenirs. Joe Stone,
2-4401. )142
MOTORCYCLES
New and used Harley, Indian, B.S.A.
and Norton. 207 W. Liberty. Ph. 2-1748.
Open evenings until 9. )
Cousins on State Street
LIGHTWEIGHT POPLIN SPORT
JACKETS. ZIPPERED FRONTS. $7.95
A LIVE GIFT for Mother's Day. Cana-
ries, Parakeets, Lovebirds and Finches.
Mrs. Ruff ins,_562_S._Seventh. )2B
EASTMAN KODAK, postcard size. Box
111 Sand Creek. Call 40J: )132
WOMAN'S riding boots size 8%. Ex-
cellent condition. Phone 8539 after
_5:00. )80
1940 TUDOR STUDE. Comm. 1949 en-
gine, new clutch, transmission, &
overdrive. Call after 5:00 p.m. YP
.4665M11. )137
WES'TINGHOUSE FLATIRON - Never
used. $13 value for $10. Cali 3-1511
ext. 405. )134
CUSHMAN SCOOTER 1950. Auto trans-
mission. Used three weeks. Wind-
shield, speedometer. Priced to suit.
Call_3-4592. )126
1947 WHIZZER MOTORBIKE - Lights,
horn, basket, front and back wheel
brakes. Little mileage. Call 2-9374.
)121
DIAMOND engagement and wedding
rings. Large discount. Jay Angle,
wholesale representative. Ph. 2-4481.
1950 ENGLISH motorcycles $280 up.
India M/C Sales, 207 W. Liberty.
Phone 2-1748. Open evenings. )83
3 SPEED ENGLISH LIGHTWEIGHTS.
$47.50. PARTS AND ACCESSORIES.
Student Bicycle Agency, 629 E. Univ.
77
TODAY and WEDNESDAY

'Pau

l!f,+,(
u a". . ''..
i

Spencer
Tracy

James
Stewart

was released on $20 bond.

University of Michigan
COUNCIL OF THE ARTS, SCIENCES
AND PROFESSIONS
will have a
REGULAR MEMBERSHIP MEETING
and PROGRAM
at the Michigan League
on Wednesday, May 10, 7:30 P.M.

"MALAYA"
- and -
"TENSION"
RICHARD BASEHART
WED. & THURS.
Shown at 3:25 - 6:40 - 9:55
RIDE n
Fop.ALE
CLAUDETTE COLBEP.T
ROBERTYOUNG
GEORGE B R E.NT- A RKR0IICTU
PLUS
y u
Starring
BARBARA STANWYCK

FA' FAP
GIL _d

I ,

lpewh )u9 Cqflfee ~
1204 South University
serving
BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS and DINNERS
SANDWICHES and SALADS
from
7:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. and 5:00 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Closed Sundays

PHIL HARRIS
-- Extra
FLOYD WERLE
'51 S.M.
alternating with
PAUL TOMPKINS
at the Grand Organ
All Evening Shows

TO DAY'S
SPECIAL
Special
from 5 to 7 P.M.
Fried
Sausage Patty
American
Fried Potatoes
Tossed Salad
Roll & Butter
Coffee & Tea
45c Special
MEAL TICKETS
on Sale
$5.00 value for $4.50

11

Continuous t . 44c to
from 1 P.M. r 5 P.M.
-- TODAY AND WEDNESDAY --
HUMPHREY
"Slow down,/
mister. We js e! ,'
WHEN THERE'Z A
REDHEAD TO GET,
s:CLOSE TO, HE MOVES
FASTER THAN..-..
k::* '-:::::"t:::; '.:::;;S

CL UB211...
Where students

have enjoyed excel

lent meals

at amazingly

low prices

for over a year!

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