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April 29, 1950 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

SATURDAY, APRIL 29, 195

FAG DAY WEDNESDAY:
Fresh Air Camp Gives Kids Vacation
By HERBERT CHESTON
If a little underprivileged ten
ear old boy spends this summer
way from the heat and grime of
,untry, swimming, fishing, boat-
g and having fun, you can be
are he may be one of the 240}
cky kids at the Fresh Air Camp.}f
A University project on Patter- ~
n Lake 25 miles from Ann Ar- i
Dr it is supported jointly by so- gnis n h tdnsa
iculty of the University by Mich-
ras, projects and Tag Days.X
* * *

EACH SUMMER the camp pro-
des a four week vacation for the
rgotten boys of Metropolitan
ichigan areas, the kids who
ight get into trouble, if left in
e cities.
From morning to evening the
ound of activities is kept go-
ng by a trained staff of psy-
hologists, psychiatrists and so-
;ologists.
It's all fun for the boys from
Takfast reveille, through athle-
cs, games,crafts and singing,
.1 the evening taps sounds bed-
me at 9:30 p.m.
THE CAMP was founded back
1921,Calmost thirty years ago,
hen a University football tackle,
id student- pastor of the Pres-
terian Church took a group of.
ty boys on a two week camping
p. That was the beginning of
iat now is the Fresh Air Camp.
It was a long hard road to
uild from the tents and poles
hat once provided sleeping shel-
er, and even a place to cook, to

CHOWTIME-It's meal time at the University Fresh Air Camp
and the food looks good. A University project providing summer
camping for 240 underprivileged children, the camp is supported
in part by a Tag Day collection which will take place Wednesday.
the modern set of 26 buildings, $adjustment problems of late child-

with electric lights and running
water.
It was built, building by build-
ing, year after year, bf the friends
and supporters of the camp, and
by hard working University stu-
dents, who contributed the pro-
ceeds of giant projects such as
Michigras.
EACH YEAR, part of the an-
nual budget for items such as
food is met by a Fresh Air Camp
Tag Day.
Connected with the fresh air
camp is the University Work-
shop in Human Behavior con-
ducted at the camp, every sum-
mer.
Gathered together are students
and teachers of psychIology social
work and education to study the

hood and early adolescence.
* *t *
AFFORDING INSIGHT into in-
dividual growth and group be-
havior, the camp serves as a model
laboratory for the University
classes.
There they work with the
boys, many of whom have sym-
ptoms of maladjustment already
deeply rooted, and others who
come from foster homes, or are
having difficulties in school.
Since all of the boys have been
sent by some one of the 25 coop-
erating social agencies, who feel
the boy needs relief from the
pressures of an unfortunate en-
vironment, the kids present prob-
lems which will task the ingenu-
ity of any adult student.

ibion High
ehool Wins
ebate Here

Albion high school debaters yes-
terday won a debate with Ply-
mouth high school on the ques-
tion whether the President should
be elected by direct vote of the
people.
The state championship debate
of the Michigan High School For-
ensic Association was held in con-
nection with School Masters' Club
meeting here.
ALBION DEBATERS John Gil-
bert and Sue Carter held that the
present electoral system was in-
valid because the American peo-
ple are now capable of voting di-
rectly for the President and be-
cause the electoral college has been
practically unsuccessfui.
The Plymouth team countered
that the electoral college should be
preserved to provide representa-
tion for both population and area.
At the Schoolmasters' busi-
ness meeting University Presi-
dent Alexander G. Ruthven was
elected an honorary life mem-
ber of the club. Registrar Ira.
M. Smith was elected club pres-
ident.
The club also passed a resolu-
tion recommending that the fed-
eral government set up scholar-
ships for students who could not
otherwise attend college.

Chances of Human-Ape Cross
Draws Scientist's Comment
(

Though there is little likeli-
hood of fertility between man
and ape, F. P. Thieme of the an-
thropology department suggested
that scientists may well explore
the possibilities of artificial in-
semination of apes by hutman
seed.
He commented on a recent As-1
sociated Press report that Prof. S.1
W. Britton of the University of
Virginia had discussed the possi-
bility of producing a race of hu-
man-like animals capable of do-I
ing laboring work.
Although well established spe-
cies differences do exist between
man and other primates, there
have been successful species cross-
es between other animals in the
past, Thieme said.
He pointed out that a sharp dis-
tinction now exists between man
and the lower animals.
Since man is distinguished pri-

marily by his ability to use sym-
bols, any such offspring of man
and ape would be human by defi-
nition only if they were able to
use languages. If they could not
use symbols, they would be no
more useful to man for laboring
than other animals are, he ex-
plained.
The problem of the usefulness
of such creatures, if they could
be produced, is therefore purely
a speculative one, according to
Thieme. The question of their ex-
ploitation would have to be treat-
ed along with the problem of hu-
man exploitation, he declared.
Prof. Britton earlier warned'
that "we'd have to watch out that
such creatures, if they could be
created, wouldn't be considered as
and used as slaves. Man would
probably tend to make such be-
ings slaves, and that would prob-
ably react to our detriment."

Stason Calls
For Choice
In Powers
This country is faced with the
dilemma of choice between strict
or liberal granting of executive
discretionary powers, Dean E.
Blythe Stason of the law school
declared.
Lecturing on "Democratic Con-
trols of Administrative Discretion-
ary Power," Stason delivered the
final lecture in the current Tho-
mas M. Cooley series.
* * *
HE FORESAW from all indi-
cations that public enterprise will
continue to grow. "Therefore, we
must devote a more careful and
scientific attention to the means,
rather than the ends of adminis-
trative discretion," Stason assert-
ed.
He outlined an administrative
court as a possible answer to this
problem. "The court would con-
form with the legislative policy, it
would have an effective supervis-
ory authority and could substi-
tute judgment for agency," Sta-
son said.
He also offered the idea of a
legislative scrutinizing commit-
tee similar to the Michigan
Plan mentioned in a previous
lecture.
"Many words are used in rules
that are too abstract, and as a
result of this, unwise discretion
may easily result. This could be
limited by a careful drafting of
standards which describe the R
powers of these groups," Stason v
said.
r
Plane Rides
o
Offered Today
By Flying Club
t
If you've never been up in a c
plane and want to try your chance t
comes today when the Uni- C
versity flying club holds open s
house from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. to- j
day at the Ann Arbor air port.-
All day long club members will a
be on hand at the airport to take b
interested visitors up and tell thAn
about the flying club.
HEC * * * -
THE CLUB, founded in 1941, is a
student organization formed for
the purpose of bringing the cost
of flying down to what a student 1
can afford. gs
By forming a joint stock com- 0
pany, the members have been ablea
to purchase two airplanes, a Piper °
cub J3 and Cessna 140.
"We expect quite a crowd Sat-
urday," said John Hammersmith,
'51, club president. "Last time we
held open house so many people
showed up we almost couldn't
handle them."
HAMMERSMITH holds a pilots'
licence he earned through flying
with the club. He believes that
flying gets into your blood.
"Most people who show up for
open house later join the club and
go at it like crazy. It's a wonder-
ful sensation, something like the
first time you drive a car, but it
lasts and comes back every time
you're in the air," he said.
:-'

PERSONAL
MAIZIE: will see you tonight at the
League at "Flapper Daze." Attractive
Date. )67P
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
209 S. State
Phone 8161 )1P
TRES DEL I C I EUX
or "BEST MEALS ON CAMPUS"
Have you tried the 39c luncheon at
J. D. Miller's Cafeteria 211 S. State?
Entree, potato, vegetable, bread, but-
ter and beverage, all for only 39c. Try
it today. )2P
10 MEALS FOR $4.99
The new "STREAMLINER" meal tick-
et gives you 5 lunches and 5 dinners
for only $4.99 at Club 211, 211 S. State.
Your ticket expires only when com-
pletely punched. Regular meal tick-
ets are still available. )2P
LOST & FOUND
LOST-Fraternity pin in vicinity of
I.M.2Bldg. Reward. Call Carl Bieser
2-6824. )69L
LOST-Racine wristwatch with metal
band. Call 250611. )64L
WANTED TO RENT
3 WORKING GIRLS need furnished
apt. for summer. References furnish-
ed if desired. Ph. 23159. _ )13N
ACCOMMODATIONS FOR ONE person
for summer: with cooking privileges.
Call Dorothy Carlson, 5723, 9-5; 258-
478 after 7. . )17N

"LISTEN AND REMEMBER": Louis
nick, '50, watch as Bill Zeller, '50, A
on the second record of Michigan's
Omicron Pi house. Club members a
record around the campus.
New Wolverine C
Release Revolves
The second of three discs for the
Wolverine Club's "Listen and wi
Remember" album is currently re- fr
volving around campus. Ur
Club members are making the It
rcunds of houses and dormitories IF
n campus this week and next to stL
play the new 12 inch vinelyte rec-
rd for prospective album buyers.
TAKING UP WHERE the first m
'ecord leaves off, the disc records
campus activity highlights from sn
Varsity night last November ph
hrough the 1950 J-Hop. The ex-
citement of the Ohio State game, un
the songs of Caroling groups at be
Christmas time, and the smooth ed
strains of the J-Hop bands are W
ust a few of the memories which th
are preserved on this part of the
album, according to John Za-
briskie, club publicity manager. O
When completed, "Listen and
Remember" will contain a rec-
ord of events which covers the
whole school year. :
Starting with Orientation events or
ast September, the first record m
goes through the freshman-soph- fr
omore tug-of-war, homecoming W
activity, and the ups and downs O
of the 1949 football season. M

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
se Moore, '51, and Dotti Mala-
W4olverine Clb president puts
memory album at the Alpha
are currently playing the new
a ,
*t
aub Disk
on Campus
THE RECORD yet to be made
11 preserve some of the laughs
m Senior Night, JGP, and the
nion Opera, Zabriskie promised.
will also take its hearers to the
'C ball and President Ruthven's
udy.
The "Listen and Remember"
over is planned to bring back
Michigan memories also.
apsho ts of campus itaken by
otographer Alex Lmanian, '50
The album will sell for $6.50
Ltil May 1, when the price will
upped to $7.00, Zabriskie warn-
. Orders will be taken by the
olverine Club demonstrators at
e various residences.
~rientation Aids
Tay Sign Up Now
Men who want to aid in the
ientation of next fall's fresh-
in may sign up for interviews
m 3 to 5 p.m. Monday through
ednesday in the Union Student
upices, according to Union staff-
an Gene Mesh, '52. t
WHITNEY-Starts Today
inuous MOVIES ARE
rom
P.M. BETTER
THAN EVER!
I
LAST
TIME
TODAY -
'BAGDAD"
WITH MAUREEN O'HARA
___AND
Mfrs
Atm MInight"

WITH HURD HATFIELD I
enings TUESDAY
nday "BATTLEGROUND"
SLEAGUE
RTS UNION
Comedy
4M

By JIM BROWN
Emulating the features of a
modern drug store, the Univer-
sity's new Prescription Laboratory
hs equipped with 20 of the latest
design prescription, counters.
The laboratory, under the direc-
tion of Prof. Elmon L. Cataline, of
the College of Pharmacy, is used
by more than 55 students every
week.
SPLIT UP INTO three four-hoar
lab sections, the students spend
two semesters in the laboratory
filling more than 100 prescriptions
at the well-equipped prescrip-
tion counters.
"Our goal is to make the lab-
oratory as much like a profes-
sional store as we can," Prof.
Cataline explained.
Each student is given a iet of
prescriptions-usually written out
in the doctor's traditionally bare-
ly decipherable hand-and spends
the four-hour lab sections filling
and labeling the orders.
"EA C H PRESCRIPTION is
checked carefully for neatness,
proper labeling and accuracy,"
Prof. Cataline said, "and then
filed, just as they are in commer-
cial pharmacy stores."
"All of the medicines and drugs
prepared by students are discard-
ed after being approved," he add-
d, "because they are merely prep-
araton& ;made in the course of
learning, and attempts to recover
anything from them have proved
uneconomical."
A 'new feature will soon be
added to the Prescription Lab-
'oratory procedure, when test
prescriptions are called in to
New Gargy Issue
Gargoyle, campus humor maga-
zine, . will publish a special
"Smooth" edition Monday, ac-
cording to Roger Crabb, '52, cir-
culation manager.
I-~I

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

stidents by way of a newly-in-
stalled telephone.
"In many commercial drug
stores at least 75 per cent of the
prescriptions are phoned in," Prof.
Cataline explained, ".and we want
to make our laboratory as auth-
entic as possible.
DESIGNED BY Prof. Cataline,
the allmetal prescription counters
are used by one student at a
time. They are equipped with spe-
cial racks for storing drugs and
utensils and have highly accurate
balances for measuring prescrip-
tion ingredients.
In addition, each counter has
a special locked case for stor-
ing narcotics and other poisonous
drugs which are sometimes used
in filling prescriptions.
Visitors passing through the
first floor corridor of the Chem-
istry Building Addition, where the
Prescription Laboratory is located,
can watch the students at work
through three huge plate glass
windows.
Exhibits of the newer commer-
cial drugs are on display in these
windows and there are additional
showcases just inside thelabora-
tory which are filled with standard
commercial drugs handled by all
pharmaceutical companies - "to
acquaint students with the pro,-
prietary products and their trade
names," Prof. Cataline said.

Continuous from 1 P.M.
LAST TIMES TODAY!

:4

A,

DRUG STORE STYLE:
Mock Prescriptions
Filled in New Laboratory

l

A

ENDING TODAY

WA NTED A WIFE for
A SECOND-HAND FATHER!
\ a

Starts Sunday -
A bnT U7 =

'K

A'

Ass FIED
__

Cont
-rf1
1:30

a.

0 Sunday & Monday

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone .V-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday Is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 AJM. for Sunday Issue.
BUSINESS
SERVICES
ACCURATE TYPING. Reasonable rates.
Phone 29437. )33B
EXCELLENT DAY NURSERY - Phone
2-7810. )32B
SPRING ITEMS NOW IN-Nearly New
Clothing Shop, 311 E. Huron. Ph.
3-0166. Open 12-5:30, Sat. 10-5. )8B
.SHIRTS- Nine hour service (by re-
quest), three day service (regular ser-
vice). Ace Laundry, 1116 S. Univer-
sity. )7B
VIOLA STEIN-EXPERIENCED TYPIST
-Master's and Doctor's manuscripts
and legal work. Phone 2-9848 after
noon. )30B
TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales and Service
MCRRILL'-314 S. State St. )11B
HILDEGARDE SHOPPE
109 E Washington
Expert Alterations
Custom Clothes
by Established Tradition )3B
WASHING, ironing done in my own
horne. Also rough dry and wet wash-
ing. Free pick up and delivery. Ph.
n nnIM 1B

I z

FOR SALE

1936 BUICK 4 DOOR, R & H. Excellent
condition. Reasonable. 934 S. State.
Phone 6088. )110
TO HIGHEST BIDDER-Portable de-
luxe 78 rpm record changer-player.
Call Don Pelz, 2-7603. )102
MOTORCYCLE, 1947 INDIAN 74 c.c.
Black, White Buddy seat, saddle bags.
windshield. 5,000 miles. Ph. 28783. )85
MATCHED SET-Ralph Guldahl golf
clubs. 4 irons, 1 wood. Never been
used $21.95. Chas. White. 0-21 Law
Club. 3-4145. )104
3 SPEED ENGLISH LIGHTWEIGHTS.
$47.50. PARTS AND ACCESSORIES.
Student Bicycle Agency, 629 E. Univ.
) 77
NEW SPECIAL OFFER -78 weeks of
TIME for only $6.87. New subscrip-
tions only. Phone Student Periodical
Agency, 2-8242. )2_
BLUE, GREEN, YELLOW & WHITE ba-
by Parakeets-$4.49 - $5.49 each. 562
S. Seventh. Ph. 5330. )2B
1 EXCELLENTLY CARED FOR lrmed
oak Ansley Radio Vie, Webster chang-
er, 9 tube radio, table model. Liberty
Music Shop._)109
2 EASON TICKETS-Main floor center
for May Festival. For information
call Dr._L._Campbell, 2-?373. )108
ELEVEN one-hour reels of recording
wire-$20.00,or will sell single reels.
Write Box 214. )106
HIGH FIDELITY Meissner Radio, five
bands, 13 tubes. Call 2-6947. )105
Motorcycle Sales
10 days only-many to choose from.
India M/C Sales, 207 W. Liberty. Ph.
2-1748. Open evenings. )9
WIRE RECORDER ---. Manufactured by
Webster-Chicago, the producers of
the world's finest audio-recording
e quipment. Will record up to one
hour. Recording will last forever or
can be erased and wire can be reused.

FOR SALE
WOMAN'S riding boots size 8i. Ex-
cellent condition. Phone 8539 after
5:00. -) 80
1950 ENGLISH motorcycles $280 up.
India M/C Sales, 207 W. Liberty.
Phone 2-1748. Open evenings. )83
3 SPEED ENGLISH LIGHTWEIGHTS.
$47.50. PARTS AND ACCESSORIES.
Student Bicycle Agency, 629 E. Univ.
77
t4Rf HELP
WANTED
DO YOU need any help? If so, you will
get good results from a DAILY HELP
WANTED ad. Try it and see. )7P
EMP0L YMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
MEDICAI PERSONNEL
for medical and dental field.
408 Park Ave. Bldg. WO 3-5789
DETROIT, MICHIGAN )1E
FOR RENT___
FURNISHED APARTMENT for four
men. Kitchen and four rooms. Call
2-7318. )18F
WANTED-2 girls to share large apt.
near campus and hospital. Ph. 2-7026
evenings. )17F
ANNEX for a fraternity. Study rooms,
dormitory sleeping quarters. South-
east section, 10 minute walk from
Engineering Arch. Telephonek2-4346.
) 16F

PLUS-
GENE RICHARD
in
CHARLES BICKFORD
?OtACd entr . 9ilr

1.1k.

-- --SUNDAY
Samuel Goldwyn's
"MY FOOLISH HEART"

ARt1 CINEMNA
AND INTERAR
preser
AHilarious
GODE

10.

. . - S
6
/ ( . }

TRANSPORTATION

BEN HECIIT'S
k story of dark terror and strange lovel
ARPILRI C PICTURE

SThD Y IN EUROPE T{IHS SUMMER.
Call Dick Arnesen. 2-8265, after 5 p.-
M., for ifo on low-cost study plans,

I

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