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April 23, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-04-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIHE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, APRIL 2
POLITICAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE:

Stormy Controversies Fill Prof. Wernette's Career
By PETER HOTTON president of the University of In fact, the Regents met secret-
Starting out right in the midst New Mexico. ly and started firing proceedings.
of everything controversial in p01-.
itics and business throughout his During his term as president, The president got wind of this,
educational career is Prof. Philip the little college jumped in en- and told them "You can't fire a
Wernette of the School of Busi- rolment from 924 to 4,491 stu- college president as you might fire
ness Administration, who has once dents, almost 500 per cent. He add- a janitor." They held off for a
more hit the limelight in the hotly ed a new pharmacy, law and bus- while, but got up enough nerve to
contested Herbert J. Phillips in- iness administration schools to the let him go at the beginning of
cident still raging on campus. university. "I didn't know I could 1948. * , ,
After having offered to debate work so hard," he said.
Communist Phillips on "Capital- * * * THIS AFFAIR didn't appear to
bother Prof. Wernette a bit. He
ism vs. Communism," Prof. Wer- BUT PROF. WERNETTE was a came to Michigan the following
nett was blocked in his efforts little too fastidious in his appoint- fall as professor of business ad-
bytthe Unesity Lecuren Coin -ments, and carefully checked up ministration and director of the
rmtes ,deisgon barring R on the qualifications of his ap- Bureau of Business Research.
from debating on campus r pointees.Rusai Prf
* * * While in Russia in 1933, Prof.
BUT PROF. WERNETTE'S con- When he advertised for a new Wernette got a look-see into the
troversial position doesn't start, tlaw school dean, the Regents, who Russian economic system, which
and probably won't end here. Ad his improvements, he said "was backward then and
pressured him with a man whoisbcwrno.
former university president, eco- red h th nmb is backward now."
nomic adviser and world-traveler, degrees he had and had been He added that the American
he started with a bang on the stu-dershehdadhdbntdrdf mran
dent newspaper of his undergrad- PROF. PHILIP WERNETTE disbarred in California.. Besides, standard of living, a median fami-
dentnewsaperof is udergad-he was the son-in-law of a Span- ly income of $3,200, is still some six
uate college, the University of . , . highly controversial ish vote-controlling politician, times that of Russia's. He predict-
California. He held "practically * * * shed that "If nothing interfered with
every position on the paper except years in South America and Prof. Wernette didn't take at economic conditions, such as wars
society and art editors." Russia. During the war he all well to this pressure. Though or governmental meddlings, the
After his work in the west, he worked as liaison officer for the the Regents' "favorite son" re- average United States family in-
studied and taught at Harvard Office of Price Administration, signed, Prof. Wernette got no come wil grow in the next 50 years
for 18 years, and served several and in June, 1945, was made thanks. to more than $8,500."

World Problems Discussed in Panels

(Continued from Page 1)
removed, we have democracy and
oligarchy," he said.
* * *
AN OLIGARCHY which is in-
flexible will be able to supress but
not to extinguish its opposition.
It will lead to a revolution for de-
mocracy, he said.
Criticizing the political theory
of the last 50 years as too con-
cerned with descriptions of what
has been said and done in the
past, Prof. Easton declared:
"Political theory cannot say
what THE good political order is,
but at the very least it can say
what a good political order in the
near future would be."
* * '.
PROF. ELDERSVELD emphasiz-
ed that political research should
employ scientific methods and dis-
cipline, and that co-operation with
other social sciences is essential
for political scientists.
Stating that "modern bureau-
cracy presents no threat to estab-
lished values," Prof. Smithburg
said that the study of public ad-
ministration should contain more
emphasis on theory.
"Absence of theory leads to a
meaningless collection of facts,"
he said.
Occupation ...
True democracy within the oc-
cupation system can not be rea-
lized, Prof. Gerhard von Glahn of
the University of Minnesota charg-
ed at a discussion of occupation'
policy.
"Under occupation it is impos-
sible to be completely democratic
in our relations with the Germans;
without occupation there is little
chance that democracy would ever
come to life there either," the for-
mer member of the American mili-
tary government said.
* * *
PROF. VON GLAHN expressed
doubt that Germany will ever be-
come a democratic nation, and
said that weaknesses in our occu-

pation policy have further lessened
the possibility that -it might. ,
He listed these mistakes as ig-
noring democratic elements in
German society, allowing anti-
democrats to creep back into
government, bringing top lead-
ers in -the occupation home too
soon and not granting absolute
civil rights German state con-
stitutions.
Passing over recent reports of a
new German nationalism as press
sensationalism, Prof. Von Glahn
warned that Americans can not
simply tell Germans to be demo-
cratic and expect them to be so.
* * *
AT THE SAME meeting, Volk-
mar Kahlert, correspondent for
the Suddentscher Zeitung, now at
the University under the State De-
partment's cultural exchange pro-
gram, asked for support for the
new German press which he term-
ed the most democratic institu-
tion in Germany.
Kahlert said that removal of the
licensing German papers has given
rise to numerous small, national-
istic journals that threaten to
wipe out larger but less well off
democratic papers.
Internationial
Politics,. ..
"Nobody loves the State Depart-
ment because no real explanations
are given to the people until a
crises is reached," Prof. Arnold J.
Kuhn, of DePauw University, said
at a discussion of international
politics.
Prof. Kuhn made three sugges-
tions for further state department
policy: more long-range policies;
better planning; more faith in the
people.
* * *
IN A CONTINUATION of the
subject of the State Department,
Prof. Ferdinand A. Hermans, of
the University of Notre Dame, said
that appeasement toward Russia is
useless.

"Although any general discus-
sion with Russia is futile, negotia-
tions over any practical, immed-
iate point is worth trying," he de-
clared.
Prof. Leon Epstein, of the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin, said nation-
alization has not been favorable
politically since the workers have
not been very enthusiastic."
"Nevertheless, British Socialism
serves as an object of envy since
it is a model of democracy and
strong labor government," he said.
* *
State
Reorganiation.. .
The state legislature cannot af-
ford to match departmental funds
with the apparently inexhaustible
federal supply, John°A. Perkins,
assistant provost of the University
declared at a discussion meeting
of state reorganization.
In the "new federalism," the
state spends to its limit trying to
equal federal aid to state projects,
he asserted.
PERKINS recommended more
proportional representation of the
legislators, based on population.
"Few legislators feel vitally
the effect of state services, such
as the universities, because stu-
dents come from the more popu-
lous areas and the legislators
from more sparsely settled lo-
calities, he explained.
A state manager, with functions
comparable to a city manager's,
was suggested by Lloyd M. Short,
of the University of Minnesota and
the Minnesota Survey Commis-
sion.
"IF THE CHIEF executive ,does
not have the administrative know-
how, then he needs some one who
does at his right hand," Short as-
serted.
, Michigan has an appointed
Commissioner of Administration
-a position once held by Per-

kins-but the commissioner has
more limited power than the
proposed state manager, Perkins
added. A
Perkins' outlined plans of the
State Reorganization Commission
to improve efficiency and economy
and to strengthen direct popular
control of state government. ,
Reorganization plans have been
presented three times in Michi-
gan, and have made some im-
provements, such as combining
overlapping departments, he said. j
State Labor.. .
State legislation limiting labor
powers could have a drastic effect
if it were enforced on a nation-
wide basis, Prof. Charles C. Kil-
lingsworth, of Michigan State Col- i
lege declared at a discussion of
state labor relations legislation.
Prof. Rollin B. Posey, of North-
western University, went along
with the idea saying that legisla- i
tors feel they have fixed a trouble-
some situation when they have
enacted a law concerning it.
"THE FACT IS that often the
administration does not want to
enforce the law and the public
feels satisfied as long as they -
know the law exists," Prof. Posey
noted.
Prof. . Murray Edelman, of
the University of Illinois, sug-
gested that the wave of labor re-
stricting legislation in the states
that began in 1939 was due to
protests of small interest groups
such as agriculture against the
growth of unions.
The final panel of the three day
conTerence will be held today when
Ralph E. Himstead, general secre-
tary of the American Association
of University Professors discusses
"Threats to Freedom of Social Sci-
entists."
Elmer Davis, Washington news
commentator, who spoke at the
Phi Betta Kappa dinner here last
night, has remained to participate
in the meeting.

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DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 5)
a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Phone 6300.
Ninth Annual Luncheon Confer-
ence on Supply, Demand and
Placement of Teachers in Michi-
gan. In addition to report of re-
sults of current study, Dr. Earl
J. McGrath, U.S. Commissioner
of Education, will speak on "Gen-
eral Education in High School and
College." 12:15 p.m., Fri., April 28,
League Ballroom. Reservations for
luncheon should be made at the
Bureau of Appointments by Thurs.,
6 p.m. Sun., May 14.
Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia: Initi-
ation and Banquet postponed until
6 p.m., Sunday, May 14.
Young Progressives of America:
Special membership meeting, 7:30
p.m., Mon., April'24. Banning of
Phillips-Wernette debate.
Cancellation. Recess-time Party
planned for 7:30 p.m., Mon., April
24, for School of Education stu-
dent-teachers, and faculty mem-
bers has been canceled.
Mu Phi Epsilon Musicale in hon-
or of all freshmen women in the
School of Music. Soloists: Ruth
Campbell, Emily Karch and Dor-
othy Webb. Formal. Ten scholasti-
cally highest freshmen girls to be
honored. 8 p.m., Mon., April 24,
Hussy Room, League.

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