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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 20, 1950 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-04-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY

"M' Golfers Face Tough
Buckeye Squad Saturday

By TED PAPES
Rain and wet grounds forced
postponement of yesterday's sche-
duled golf engagement between
Michigan and the University of
Detroit.
The match has been rearranged
for Tuesday, April 25.
* * *
AS SKIES CLEARED in the
early afternoon, Coach Bert Katz-
enmeyer sent his golfers through
a practice round on the soggy turf
of their University course in an
Seffort to determine a travelling
squad for the meet at Columbus
on Saturday.
Ohio State's highly regarded
Buckeyes will provide the oppo-
sition there as Michigan opens
its defense of the Western Con-
ference Championship.
Playing under difficult condi-
tions yesterday, the Wolverines
recalled the fine shape in which
they found Southern courses on
their spring tour. A highlight of
Unruh Reports
Bribe Attempt
PEORIA, Ill.-M)-Paul Unruh,
All-American player on Bradley
University's basketball team, said
yesterday he received a bribe offer
in New York last month during
the National Invitational Tourna-
ment.
He disregarded the incident and
didn't mention it to Bradley of-
ficials because he didn't think it
was. important, he added.

that trip was time spent at the
Pinehurst Country Club in Pine-
hurst, North Carolina.
* * *
THE TEAM played three prac-
tice rounds at that national golf
center where some of the top
American tournaments, including
the North-South Open and Ama-
teur, are held.
The club has four separate
courses, one of which is geared
to championship play over 6,952
yards. On that layout the Wol-
verines struggled with gaping
sand traps and narrow fairways
which have tested the country's
top professional links artists.
The 18 hole record was set there
last year by Dick Chapman who
turned in a remarkable 63. Ben
Hogan has listed two Pinehurst
holes in his selection of an All-
American golf course.
* * *
MICHIGAN PLAYERS report
that they received unusual help in
negotiating the difficul fairways
and greens from specialized cad-
dies ranging in age as high as 50
years old. They were part of an
extraordinary group which lives
in a community known as "Caddy
Town" located two miles from the
course.
These veterans are extremely
helpful to visitors who are playing
the tricky layout for the first time.
Their judgment of proper clubs
to use in particular situations is
phenomenal.
Michigan officials hope to sche-
dule a regular match over the
Pinehurst course next year with
Wake Forest as an opponent..

ON THIE SPTl
By RdG GOELZ
Associate Sports Editor
(Today's column was written by Bill Connolly, Sports Night Editor.)
CRITICISMS, flying fast and furiously, have been detected heading
in the direction of the Western Conference, subsequent t its
recent ruling in regard to television-or lack of it-for 1950 football.
games.
A brief summary of the facts, reasons and circumstances
behind the decision to ban "live" television of all Big Ten football
games scheduled for next fall, however, seems to justify ade-
quately the decision made last weekend by a special committee
meeting called by the Conference.
Michigan's Fritz Crisler, chairman of the special committee, in
conjunction with a report released by the Big Ten, yesterday revealed
some facts concerning the two-day meeting and the circumstances
prompting its occasion. These factors, not heretofore emphasized,
prove that the decision was reasonable, and in the best interests of
collegiate football competition.
* * * *
FIRST OF ALL, television facilities will not be completely denied to
"shut-ins" and those who are otherwise unable to travel to the
locations of Big Ten schools.
Actually, television has not been banned . . . it has merely
been delayed. Complete films of games will be made available
for television showings starting at 6:00 p.m. on the Sunday
immediately following the day the game is played.
The public service that has in this manner been provided to sport
fans in previous seasons will thus be continued next year, to the
benefit of the Big Ten, the television companies, and the fans alike.
* *
SECONDLY, an estimate $500,000 in television rights will be lost
to Western Conference schools in 1950. It has been argued that
the loss in revenue caused by attendance decreases is more than over-
come by this compensation.
As far as the Big Ten schools are concerned, this is true.
However-and this is the main reason for the Conference's de-
cision-video viewers in the Midwestern states have been weaken-
ing their support of the smaller colleges and universities in this
area by staying home and watching the bigger games on their
TV sets.
To these small schools, football is just as important in the
support of an athletic program as it is to the university with 20,000
students. If football receipts drop, their entire sports' programs suffer
severely.
Typical of the reports filed by the smaller colleges to Tug Wilson,
the Big Ten's Commissioner of Athletics, was the message sent in by
Otterbein College, which is located in Westerfille, Ohio with a student
population of about 1000. The Otterbein Cardinals reported post-war
attendance figures averaging 3000 paid spectators per game.
Last year, however, attendance dropped to less than one-half
of this figure, with a record low of 172 paying customers attending
one contest. Clearly, no college can support a complete athletic
program on revenue so slight.
On-the-spot television of the Big Ten's games, then, was not
affecting so strongly attendance at the grid classics. More important,
though, is the fact that repercussions from the TV-casts were shaking
the foundations of the small colleges and universities and that inter-
collegiate competition in all sports has been feeling the vibrations.
* * * *
IN ITS DECISION, which constitutes the first concerted move to
prohibit on-the-spot video, the Big Ten has made a step in the
direction of preserving the entire future of intercollegiate athletic
activities.
It is significant that the decision came only after three year's
consideration and as a direct result of an extensive two-day confer-
ence, which was attended by the three-man NCAAcommittee on tele-
vision and representatives of the Pacific Coast Conference and the
Ivy League as well as all of the larger midwestern schools.

Full Weekend
Slated for Big
Ten Baseball
By BOB SANDELL
Western Conference baseball
action swings into high gear this
weekend with all squads except
Purdue beginning or continuing
their scrap for the Big Ten crown.
While Michigan entertains the
Minnesota Gophers at Ferry Field,.
Indiana travels to Iowa, Illinois
plays at Northwestern, and Wis-
consin takes on the Ohio State
Buckeyes at Madison.
THE BOILERMAKERS ride up
to East Lansing to face the Michi-
gan State diamond squad for a
game that won't be counted in
the standings.
Conference play actually be-
gan last week with four teams
dividing two game series.
Iowa edged Illinois, 6-4, in the
first contest of their weekend
clash, but were walloped, 11-0, in
the second game with Alby Plain
of the Illini turning in the shutout.
OHIO STATE rebounded with
a 15-6 triumph over Minnesota in
the nightcap of a twin-bill after
being tamed in the opener, 5-2.
A pre-season size-up indicates
that Ohio State, Illinois, and
defending co-champion Indiana
will be the strongest contenders
for the title.
The Buckeyes have Pete Perini
returning, a righthanded hurler
who has won 10 of 14 conference
tussles in the last two years.
THEY ALSO have a second
baseman, Carl Parrill, and an out-
fielder, Ray Gebhardt, both of
whom batted around .400 last
spring.
Indiana has six regulars re-
turning, including two pitchers,
that will make them tough,
while the Ilini has virtually
their whole squad back from
last year.
The Wolverines are a darkhorse
candidate at the very most, and
practically the rest of the schools
can be placed in the same cate-
gory.
Pitching is still the big prob-
lem confronting Ray Fisher. It's
a big item on any baseball squad
and Ray is far from satisfied with
the showing of his mound staff
thus far.
MAJOR LEAGUE
STANDINGS

JERRY FANGER
This week officially starts the
150 team spring Intra-Mural pro-
gram consisting of 13 sports.
There will be competition in the
various divisions in softball, ten-
nis, horseshoes, and golf; also
.there are scheduled All-Campus
events in gymnastics, tennis, golf,
rifle shooting, archery, cricket,
lacrosse, baseball, life-saving, soc-
cer, and competition for initiation
into Siglma Delta Psi.
WITH the elements against
them, the softball leagues have
already got under way withhover
a century of teams in a fight for
leadership in their respective di-
visions.
Four-man tennis teams are
planned for division competi-
tion. Meanwhile entries are still
being taken for the All-Campus
tournament that starts April
28th.
The Turks will field a stronger
team than last year when they
took the soccer championship.
The Persians, Arabs, and South
Americans are the other entries
in soccer play which is limited to
squads from the International
Center only.
* * *
WITH ROOM for another team
in the league, I-M baseball will
take over the freshman diamond
Monday at 5:30 p.m. The Puffs,
Muffers, Big Reds, Hinsdale
House, and Independents are the
only teams listed so far.
Baseball is played as an in-
dividual rather than division
sport. Anyone wishing to play
Ia 1IdIM/f
Lain Joe-Jeaiig
In Jane-kmifpo 15

hardball should contact Rod
Grambeau at the I-M office.
Residence Halls, fraternities,
and independents will each field
six man golf teams this year.
Only the best five scores of each
team will count. Low qualifiers
will be eligible for the All-Campus
tourney set for May 21st.
* * *
FOR THE first time in the his-
tory of Intra-Mural sports la-
crosse will be playel this year. In-
dividual entries are being accepted
at the I-M office.
Ferry Field was originally a
cricket field, and this spring
that sport will be back at its
old haunt for the first time in
over 30 years.
A cricket club has been organ-
All faculty tennis singles and
golf entries close on Saturday,
April 29th. Entries are to be
made at the I-M building by
phone or in person.
-Chris Christiansen
ized, and play will get underway
next week with 30 students par-
ticipating.
RIFLE shooting starts next
week with competition in novice,
marxman, and expert divisions.
Each participant will shoot 40
rounds prone and 10 standing.
The newly formed archery club is
also planning a tournament.
As usual horseshoes will be
played as a competitive sport.
The teams consist of sik~ men
playing three doubles matches.
On May 5th the All-Campus
gymnastics meet will take place

ALL THIS AND CRICKET TOO:
150 Squads Start I-M Spring Card

under the supervision of Varsity
Coach Newt Loken. The life sav-
ing instructors course has already
started. However, anyone who has
passed the senior Red Cross test
may still enter the course by next
Tuesday.
THE National Honorary ath-
letic fraternity, Sigma Delta Psi,
next week starts tests for initia-
tion. Earl Riskey, I-M director
and newly elected president of the
organization, announced yester-
day.
The tests consist of 15 different
qualifications including hand
stands, mile run, javelin throw,
swimming, and scholarship. All
those who are interested in tak-
ing the tests should report to the
I-M building on Tuesday at 4:00
p'.m.
A varsity letter may be sub-
stituted for the test in the ,given
sport.
COLLEGIATE BASEBALL
SCORES
Illinois 12, Grand Rapids 5
Penn 4, Navy 0
N. Carolina State 3, N. Caro-
lina 1
Wake Forest 5, Duke 0
NU 13, Lake Forest 4
Kansas 11, Rockhurst 10

{

SPRING IS HERE!
We feature: Individualistic, Suave,
Collegiate Hair Styles for Spring.
Try one !
The DASCOL.A BARBERS
Liberty off State

I

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J

m - = I

1 ,.

Sport Coats.
IN HERRINGBONE
AND CORDUROY
17.95 - 24.95
MAROONS, GREYS, TANS
SLACKS
to harmonize
7.95 up
Gabardines in all the new shades

MEN'S TOGGEHY
521 East Liberty Street-Michigan Theatre Bldg.

sr

fiu4o" Me lPru -----

. ; .-
_----,"
. , .

L

JEWELRY
New Hickok inspirations in
tropical accessories for the
sportswear-ing American male.

1;

Propeller Tie Bar,
Propeller Cuff Links,

$2.50
$2.50

WALK A FEW STEPS AND SAVE DOLLARS
KUOHNS

"MIGUELITO VALDES (above)
plays Ernsto Lecuona" ... Mala-
guena, Say Si Si, Always In My
Heart, and 3 others in this new
danceable album! RCA Victor has
just come out with 15 new albums
ALL "Designed For Dancing."
Everyone's stepping again! 15
great bands, 15 great composers,
90 hits! And what an album
Miguelito has! Get all 15 at Lyon
and Healy Inc., 508 E. William.

i
i

Set $5 --
II(

217 East Liberty

Phone 8020

Plus Fed. tax

r

AMERICAN LEAGUE

WHO WILL BE

Team
St. Louis
Detroit
New York
Washington
Philadel.phia
Boston
Cleveland
Chicago
YESTERDAI

W L Pct. G.B.
2 0 1.000 .. .
1 0 1.000 2
2 1 .667 L
1 1 .500 1
1 1 .500 1
1 2 .333 1
0 1 .000 1%Y
0 2 .000 2
Y'S RESULTS

1

H.ASPEL... Refreshable Clothes

AIQ
At MICHI

Here's a date bait tit
winning[ MR. FORM
-or the collegian w
does the most for ou
eye-pleasing, comfo
AFTER SIX Summer1
And with that title g
fraternity house full
prizes-a complete
Summer Formal for1
handsome beer mug
the winner's team m
Any team can enter
athletic squads, soci
Independent groups

D
IGAN
le well worth
AL
ho
ur
rt-easing
Formal.
oes a
of valuable
AFTER SIX
the individual-
;s for each of
nates.
-fraternities;
eties or
are all eligible:
. Ykf, ,fr
OA00

Team
Boston
Chicago
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Brooklyn
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
New York

W
2
1
1
1
1
1
0
0

L
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
2

Pct.
1.000
1.000
.500
.500
.500
.500
.000
.000

G.B.
1
1
1
1
11
2

Boston 6, New York 3
New York 16, Boston 7
St. Louis 6, Chicago 1
Detroit-Cleveland (rain)
NATIONAL LEAGUE

THEY PASS EVERY
H
HOT-WEATHER TEST

for College Men

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Brooklyn 7, Philadelphia
Boston 10, New York 6
Pittsburgh 4, St. Louis 3

Visit the
MICHIGRAS CARNIVAL
at Yost Field House
April 21st and 22nd
Then visit our Parade of Values
for the balance of the summer
Featuring Nationally known merchandise
as Suits, Sportcoats, Topcoats by
Schoememan and Clotheraft.
Hats by Mallory. (They're cravenetted)
Shirts and Pajamas by Manhattan and Van Huesen
Sportswear by McGregor and Stradivari
Neckwear by Wembley - Croyton - Beau Brummel

I

Haspel Refreshable Clothes are on the
required list for Campus wear in hot
weather. Sensibly light, invitingly cool
to the appearance . . . to your com-
fort, Haspel Cord suits are thoroughly
schooled in good taste . . . completely
correct for classroom, social and tray

Has el
Sir i' w
COTTON NYLON RAYON
acwHUgIMPEt woums

;_i

eling wear.

A 1

'> 1

With the addition of nylon
these suits are now completely
washable.

I

Cotton and Nylon Cord Suits . . . $25.50
Cotton and N'vlon Cord [ackets... $20.00

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