100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 06, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, APRIL 6, 1950

A

e,
L

'SURVEY REPORT:
Stigma of Mental Illness
Hinders Psychiatric Aid

U. S. NEW, SURPRISING:
Impressions Told by Visiting Germans

By ROBERT VAUGHN
/tany people are not getting
chiatric help when they need
and when it will do the most
d because of the stigma at-
4ed to mental illness, accord-
to Murry Horowitz of the Uni-
sity's Survey Research Center.
)irector of a study of mental
ilth conducted by the Center
Phoenix, Arizona, Horowitz
nted out that at the present
fe it is difficult to get people
nake use of the facilities avail-
e to them.
* * *
IN ORDER to establish mental
ilth educational programs along
s line, it is necessary to under-
nd what views people hold on
subject. Use of the sample-
J Symphony
.t Hill Tonight
An April Overture" will be the
ture selection when Wayne
alap conducts the University
uphony Orchestra in a concert
8:30 p.m. today at Hill Ayidi-
ium.
he overture, composed by mu-
student Lee Eitzen, was first
formed at the, Student Arts
tival March 19, and is being re-
ted by popular request.
'he program includes Richard
'auss' "Don Juan," Bach's
ite No. 2 in B minor for Flute
i Strings" and "Symphonic
tamorphosis of Themes by C.
von Weber," by Paul Hinde-
h.

suirvey-interview technique
help in this respect."

may

In an attempt to discover
what attitudes "normal" people
have toward emotional problems
and the alleviation of emotional
stress, the Center is working in
conjunction with the United
States Public Health Service
which has set up a public mental
health center in the Arizona
city.
Few people are aroused by the
urgency of the problem even
though more than fifty percent of
the hospital beds in the nation are
occupied by mental patients, Hor-
owitz said.
UNITED STATES Public Health
Service figures indicate that there
are 8,000,000 persons in the nation
suffering from mental illness at
the present time.
It is also feared that at the
present rate, 1,000,000 children
now in elementary schools will
spend some time in state mental
hospitals in later life, according
to the Public Health Service.
Noting these figures, the Survey
Research Center is attempting to
provide data for the planning of
a program which will facilitate a
person's getting professional psy-
chiatric help when he needs it.
Evaluation of interviews com-
pleted in Phoenix and forwarded
to the center is now underway.
Complete results of this study will
be available later in the month.
Read Daily Classifieds

By VERNON EMERSON
The United States is a new and
continually surprising world, Karl
Kanka of the Hesse Landtag,
Germany, said yesterday in des-
cribing his impressions of America
after a two-week stay here.
Kanka and five other German
legislators are touring the nation
under the -State Department's
cultural exchange program.
* * *
"ONE OF the most democratic
processes -here seems to be your
open township meetings," Ger-
trud Harms of the Bremen city
council noted. "The citizens meet
together to discuss their problems
freely-something we do not know
in Germany."
She registered astonishment,
however, at the low vote turn-
out in the Ann Arbor elections
Tuesday.
Hans Huber of the Heidleberg
town council and judge of a Mann-
heim county court, after attending
a meeting of the League of Women

Voters, hailed our policy of quiz-
zing candidates on their political
views.
* * *
BUT HE said that he felt can-
didates were chosen because of
their political standing rather
than any qualification for office.
All of the German visitors
agreed that any of the men' in
office they have met were fair
and objective in their public
life.
After viewing both partisan and
non-partisan types of governmen-
tal set-ups, the legislators split

their opinions on which they pre-
ferred.
* * *
'"I MARVEL at the educational
system in this country," Miss
Harms said. "Here you start at the
beginning of a subject and work
through it by degrees. In my land
persons in different stages of
training in a subject are thrown
together."
And Hanka said that he wished
that his countrymen who oppose
study of the arts could come here
and see the interest that American
students show in them.

K

lIi

A

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
HERE COMES MICHIGRAS-With trumpets blaring and drums rolling the Chicago House Marching
Band appeared with banners, tandem bikes and coeds on the library steps to herald the coming of
Michigras, April 21-22. Mounting enthusiasm also prevailed at Michigras headquarters which was
swarming with committee members taking care of last minute business.
* * * *

Wichigras Offices Upset
ByPeCanvlFever

Famed Designer
To Speak Here
Norman Bel Geddes, prominent
theatre and stage designer, will
be among the speakers at a con-
ference on architecture and
equipment of a theatre which
will be -held here April 14 and 15.
Prof. William Halstead of the
speech department will also speak
before the gathering, which is be-
ing sponsored jointly by the Col-
lege of Architecture and Design
and the American Educational
Theatre Association.

Michigras, headquarters in the
Michigan Union Student Offices
was bursting with activity yester-
day asupre-carnival fever hit with
full force.
With the long-awaited fun-
h 1Z C7 P31Y

Lit Schoo
SeOnior Announcemnents

i

fest slated to come off in just two
weeks, harried central committee
members wildly scurried from
desks to special conferences as
they tried to polish off last minuteI
business.
AT ONE end of the teaming of-
fices parade co-chairmen Jerry
Mehlman and Val Lemper were
holding a pow-wow regarding their
popular "baby contest" which has
enticed more than 50 entries.
Mehlman had just dashed in
frn h iin ra n h

Takes To Air
This Evening

Student Exit
Swamps All
i Travel Routes
Bus, rail and airline facilities
will brace themselves for the
deluge today, as eager students
prepared to quit the city for a
week-long spring vacation.
Debarkees will apparently be
well accommodated, as bus lines:
and trains plan to bring extra
units into use for the occasion.
Some reservations can still be
obtained for special buses Friday
to Chicago, Grand Rapids, St. Ig-
nace, Sault Ste. Marie, Bay City,
Cleveland, Buffalo, and Pitts-
burgh. These will be generally
through buses, and sale of reserva-
tions will close at noon today.
Railroads report heavy traffic
Ui ticket sales, with most reserva-
tions gone. Two extra sections are
scheduled to pull out of Ann
Arbor tomorrow afternoon. One
will head west at 1:15 p.m., and
the other east at 7:30 p.m., in:
addition to regularly scheduled
trains.
Beginning today, seats on east-I
bound flights will be very hard
to obtain, according to M. B.
Boersma, of a local travel agency.
------- - ----

r

Leather Booklets 65c
Cardboard Booklets 35c

Folds

IOc

100 Personal Cards $2.00
Orders taken Wednesday
and Thursday 1-5 P.M.
Administration Building
-- Lobby

Shakespeare takes to the air gram the Liag. 'Tere, on the
today in the first of a series of Library steps, the Chicago
eight programs to be broadcast at House band was booming away
8 p.m. every Thursday from the with jazzed up marches to re-
University's radio station WUOM. mind students that Michigras
would envelop the campus April
Entitled "Shakespeare at Work;" 21 and 22, just five days after
the programs are designed to the end of spring vacation.
demonstrate the bard's ability as
a craftsman who wrote plays for
a competitive theatrical market, IN THE MIDST of the hub-bub
according to WUOM Script Editor was general co-chairman Bill Pet-
William Bender, Jr. "This will be erson, '51. His fingers were crossed,
an important educational series but when he surveyed all the en-
that really gets down to cases," thusiasm, he could not help but
Bender declared. feel that this year's Michigras
* * * would top them all.
SCRIPTWRITER f r the series
,r. DhF '! 'I2.n+ iC UFt..

II,

' iears #%e..d 1R!
-a' -a
l$ 9BROGUES
- Handsome and bold footwear for
roughest going. Genuine Scotch grains.
hand-waxed. Triple thick soles. Storm-
sealed 'ilts. Thew eather is sealed out,
your comfort sealed in. They're Cuis
exclusives in luxurious styling and Burly-
Flex construction for long life, rugged
comfortable wear.
FAMOUS. FLEXIBLE
CONSTRUCTION
$1 50 p.

is Prof. G. B. Harrison, o1the
English department, a well-known
critic and author of several booksI
on Shakespeare.
Prof. Harrison will narrate
the programs while students,
faculty members and WUOM
staff members will dramatize
portions of the plays.
Today's program will be a gen-
eral introduction to Shakespeare's
work. In succeeding programs,
Prof. Harrison will deal with spe-
cific aspects of Shakespeare's plots,
characterization, d i c t i o n and
poetry, horror, atmosphere and
comedy.
AMONG THOSE taking part in
today's program are Marilyn Be-
gole, 50; Beverly Ketcik, Grad;
Margaret Pell, '50; John Sargent,
'50; and Jim Bob Stephenson,
Grad. Prof. Claribel Baird, of the,
speech department, and Shirley
Loeblich, a WUOM staff member
will also take part while Jim
Schiavone will be the WUOM pro-C
ducer,
Tape recordings will enable at
least eight other Michigan radio
stations to broadcast the series.
Ann Arbor station WHRV will
broadcast all but the first program
at 10 p.m. every Thursday. Today's
program, however, will be aired
at 9:30 p.m. Saturday.
\4
ita' e'(from our infinite
variety of Eaton's Open Stock).
Gieyour smile,
your voice).
(it's so conven-
tent and economical to get match.

In Ann Arbor -
508 East William St.

-J
J
-J
;-J
-a
CL.
-J
-J
a
.
-J
a-

COb.

PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S * PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S *
CHAMPAGNE Prices Effective Thursday,
' ~ S ~ dBEER w Friday, SaturdayI
We Reserve the Right To Limit
WINE Quantities.

m
-I
A:
I-
a

FFE

Maxwell House
--W- O-S-

7r3

x

A

11

Chocolates

_ {IIlIII111EIl1GI

,

-4411 j

Spin your Spring Serenades on
r
i
V i
RE

New No Rinse
SURF
Regular 35c
Limit One
Cigarettes
Popular Brands
Carton

1

C
wi

LIBBY'S Saturday Only
Currier and '1 P.M. to 11:30 P.M
ves Glasses CHOCOLATE
8 styles from
hich to choose. SUNDAE
Set of.8
3 r 'speCial le

GILBERT'S
SCH RAFFT'S
WHITMAN'S
from
Iamid $125

A.

- -

$1.20 value
CANASTA
Sets
79c

I

Easter
Special
Chocolate Covered
CHERRIES
-
59,.
Ilb.j

Ronson Gift Lighters
*6 up

r
17
(A
V-
Lfl
XI
(A
-
Fr
m
-v
-
rf
*

l

4.

,;,

$169

Boston Symphony Orchestra
Serge Koussevitzky, Conductor
Ravel Bolero
Ma Mere L'Oye-Suite .......... .LM-1012
William Kapell, Pianist
Boston Symphony Orchestra
Serge Koussevitzky, Conductor
Khatchaturian Concerto for Piano and
Orchestra (1936)..............LM-1006

$5.45
$5.45

Limit One-plus tax
300 Cleansing
Tissues
SALE PRICED

'1

.-q

For the
Holidays
BEER
WINE

Yehudi Menuhin, Violinist
Orchestre Colonne
Jean Fournet, Conductor
Lalo Symphonie Espagnole, Op. 21
Artur Rubenstein, Pianist
Grieg Concerto in A Minor, Op. 16
RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra
Antal Dorati, Conductor
Liszt Concerto No. 1 in E-Flat
Dallas Symphony Orchestra
Antal Dorati, Conductor..........
Vladimir Horowitz, Pianist
Moussorgsky Pictures at an Exhibition.. .

r

Chocolate Covered

. LM-1011 $5.45

19C
Limit One

F

0
Champagne

EGGS
29C
dozen
11f1,1it...........,.sti

'I

I.

...LM-1018
..LM-1014

$5.45
$5.45
$5.45

... SAVINGS ..

Prokofieff Sonata No. 7 Op.
Kabalevsky Sonato No. 3 Op
Boston Pops Orchestra
Arthur Fiedler, Conductor
Offenbach Gaite Parisienne

46 .........L.-1016

.LM-1001 $4.85

-J
...
LI,

Trial Size ABSORBINE, Jr.
50c Value DRESSING COMBS
loc White SHOE LACES 3 for
Pint RUBBING ALCOHOL
G.E. No. 5 FLASH BULBS
CASHMERE BOUQUET SOAP 3 for

9c
9c,
14c'
j9C

Fresh
Double-Kay Nuts
Fancy Half Lb.
Bridge
Mix7
FOR EASTER
Fine Selection
S F'~T STS

,,,
.,

r-"
Vl'

._ _ < :

I

I

I I

IF f

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan