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April 06, 1950 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE viviE

ivirs.

Roosevelt Heads List

THE GUIDING LIGHT:

I

In Poll of Prominent Women
Who are America's most influ- tributions to politics, playwriting

Radio Serials Inspire Designers

ential women?I
On the theory that women arel
the keenest judges of their own
oex's ability, a national magazine
asked 272 women journalists to
rate the country's most famous
women, selecting the five who ex-
ert the greatest influence on mod-
ern life.
MRS. ROOSEVELT, chairman of
the United Nations Commission on
Human Rights, newspaper colum-
nist and conductor of her own tel-
evision program, topped the list,
receivingh214 out of the 272 bal-
lots. Those who voted for her
agreed that "her brains, position
and vast compassion for all hu-
manity have made themselves
felt both at home and abroad in
constructive measure for better
_f living."
Emily Post, author of the
famous Etiquette book, drew
second place with 103 votes be-
cause "she still influences the
manners and perhaps the morals
of the nation."
Sister Elizabeth Kenny, the
courageous nurse who pioneered
an unorthodox treatment for
polio, placed third with 86 votes
for "her courage against odds and
her humanitarianism which have
helped dramatize as well as solve
the problems of polio."
AI
CLAIRE BOOTH LUCE, former
Congresswoman from Connecti-
cut, topped the list of political
leaders with 70 votes which put
her in fourth place for her con-

and religion.
an n-

l
s
i

The fifth most influential
woman in the opinion of her
fellow journalists is Dorothy
Thompson, who won 69 votes for
her "outstanding approach to
world conditions."
Other prominent women who
ranked high in the poll included;
Senator Margaret Chase Smith,
Dorothy Dix, Princess Elizabeth,
and Hattie Carnegie.
Cleveland Club
To Qi've Party
With the coming of spring vaca-
tion, the members of the Cleveland
Club are planning theirannual
vacation party to be held at 8
p.m. Friday. April 14 at the Phi
Gamma Delta carriage house in
Cleveland.
Stag or drag, the members of
the club will sport blue jeans and
the most casual of dress; when
they meet for this strictly in-
formal party. No admission will be
charged, and refreshments will be
served.
One block from the Western Re-
serve campus, .the Phi Gamma
Delta carriage house is located at
11317 Bellflower Rd.
Reservations for the party are
not necessary. Further informa-
tion may be obtained by con-
tacting, in Cleveland, George Qua
at Yellowstone 28648.

"The Right to Happiness" can
belong to.any college coed.
The increasing popularity of
daytime radio serials with Ameri-
'U' Graduate
Makes Debut

can women has influenced a na-
tional manufacturer of popular
priced dresses to create a line
of spring and summer fashions in-
spired by and named after 10
daytime serials.
Shows which served as sources
of inspiration to the designer's
imaginations are, "The Road of
Life," "Young Doctor Malone,"
"Big Sister," "The Right to Hap-
nimess" "Th G ('in i~rh

P o"E RSO "NA L.
ifs,' )06 ilicatkh4t
g
LITHOGRAPH ED
with or without your picture
ORDER NOW
Pick up after Vacation
$ 3 Dup
E DWARDS LETTER SHOP
711 North University

Celia Huan, pianist and gradu- "The .Brighter Day," "Rosemary,"
ate of the University, recently "Ma Perkins," "Life Can Be Beau-
made her musical debut before an tiful" and "Pepper Young's Fami-
audience in Boston.1l
MissHuan will appear again in Wherever possible, the dresses
May as a soloist in the opening have been named for the shows
concert of the newly organized they represent. In the case of
Portland, Maine Symphony Or- "Pepper Young's Family"aand
chestra. "Young Doctor Malone," the
Miss Huan has also received at- dresses will be known by the
tention for her literary abilities names of the leading feminine
by winning the Hopwood Award characters, Peggy Young and
while a student at the University.* Anna Malone.
~DALY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

L

IRISH CHARM-Mary Collins, named "Miss Ireland" in a New
York contest, is making friends with baby Nubian goats during
a visit to the London Zoo. A trip to England was part of her
prize.
Ba rron-Luszki lard Richardson of Galena, Ill.
Miss Gaffney is a senior in
Reverend and Mrs. J. George medical technology at Wayne Uni-
Butler of Hartford, Conn. have versity and a member of Sigma
announced the marriage of their Sigma sorority.

'' "!)'
. .
, r
4
Y y

Going
to
Ma and Pa?

sister, Margaret E. Barron, to
Major Walter A. Luszki, U.S.
Army, both of Ann Arbor, on
March 15 in Detroit.
The bride, formerly of Washing-
ton, D.C. is a graduate student in
the social psychology program at
the University.
*I * *
Gaffney-Richardson
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence W. Gaff-
ney of Northville have announced
the engagement of their daughter,
Patricia Ann, to James W. Rich-
ardson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wil-

Mr. Richardson, a 'graduate of
Dubuque University, is now a ju-
nior in the University Law School
and is affiliated wth the Delta
Theta Phi law fraternity.
'I *' *
Alber-Bartley
Mr. and Mrs. L. Dean Alber of
Detroit have announced the en-
gagement of their daughter, Sally,
to John Bartley, son of Mr. and
Mrs. E. D. Bartley of Wyandotte.
Miss Alber is a junior in the
literary college and is a member
of Kappa Alpha Theta.
Mr. Bartley is a senior in the
literary college and is affiliated
with Delta Tau Delta.

T!!Iml

,.......,,,

Carry
TRAVELER' S
CUECKS
ANN ARBOR BANK
Main and Huron Sts.
uth State at Nickels Arcade 1108 South Universi

Buy Her a
Box of Stationery
FOR EASTER
MORRILL'S

a

aNL

(Continued from Page 3)
How to Meet Human Frontiers:
7:15 p.m. at the Guild House. Con-
gregational - Disciple - E & R
Guild.
Repertory Orchestra rehearsal,
7-8:15 p.m., Harris Hall.
Committee for Displaced Stu-
dents: Meeting, 4:10 p.m., Lane
Hall. Planning for September D.
P. program. Essential that all re-
presentatives be present.
International Center Weekly Tea:
4:30-6 p.m.
U. of M. Sailing Club: Business
meeting and shore school, 7:30 p.-
m., 311 W. Engineering. DUES
DEADLINE.
Student - Faculty Hour honoring
the psychology and sociology de-
partments, 4-5 p.m., Grand Rapids
Room, League.
U. of M. Sociological Society:
Meeting, 3-5 p.m., 307 Haven Hall.
Election of officers first hour.
Polonia Club: 8 p.m., Interna-
tional Center. Speaker: Mr. Karr.
Films of Poland.
Gilbert and Sullivan Society:
Full rehearsal, 7:15 p.m., League.
Costume measurements taken.
U. of M. Hostel Club: Meeting,
7 p.m., Lane Hall. Orientation
meeting for Easter vacation bi-
cycle trippers, planning and dem-
onstration for the 6 day trip to
Lake Michigan.
Coming Events
Canterury Club: Good Friday,
12 to 3 p.m., three-hour service
on the theme, "Were You There
When They Crucified Him?"
Easter Sunrise Service, sponsor-
ed by Inter Guild. Meet at Lane
Hall at 6 a.m. to go to Arboretum.
In case of bad weather, service will
be at Lane Hall. Breakfast to fol-
low.
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation:
Elections will be held April 24 for
the Executive Council, and May 1
for the Student Council. All pe-
titions for either Council must be
submitted to the Hillel Founda-
tion by April 22.

Choral Union Members are re-
minded that a regular rehearsal
will be held Tuesday evening, April
11. All members who are not out
of the city are requested to attend
at the usual hour, 7 p.m., Haven
Hall.
Members are also reminded that
Thor Johnson will conduct re-
hearsals on both Monday and
Tuesday nights, April 17 and 18.
University Museums Friday Eve-
ning Program: Exhibits on display
in the Museums building from 7
to 9 p.m. Moving pictures: "Baby
Animals," "How Animals Move,"
and "The Fur Seal," '1:30 p.m.,
Kellogg Auditorium; auspices of
the University Museums, through
the courtesy of the Audio-Visual
Education Center. "Portraits of
Michigan Mammals," by Richard
P. Grossenheider, on exhibit in the
rotunda, Museums building.
Detroit Meeting, American Chem-
ical Society on Mon., April 17.
Those interested in attending
write your name on the list posted
outside 1400 Chem. Bldg. or leave
a note in the S.A.A.C.S. mailbox
in the Chemistry Office.
Memorial Exercises in honor of
the late Alfred Korybski, who de-
veloped the system of General Se-
mantics, will be held in Room 7,
RackhamEducational Center, 60
Earnsworth, Detroit, 7 p.m., Fri.,
April 7. The public is invited.
Preliminary Instruction for the
Water Safety Instructors' Course
will be given April 17, 18, 19 and
20, 7:30 p.m. , Intramural pool.
All those planning to take the
course should attend.
April 13 Spring Conference con-
cerning employment trends will be
held at -the Michigan Union with
the following speakers: V. E. Blue,
Chrysler Corporation; Eugene C.
Swift, Saginaw Board of Com-
merce; Harold Mountain, A & P
Co.; Otto Eckert, Lansing Board
of Water and Electric Light; C.
W. Otto, Lansing Chamber of
Commerce; Harry J. Kelley, Am-
erican Seating Company; Ewan
Clague, Director of Bureau of La-
bor Statistics; with the following
campus men as chairmen: James
P. Adams, provost; John A. Per-
kins, assistant provost; R. P.
Briggs, vice-president and John W.
Lederle, associate professor of Po-
litical Science. Reservations for
luncheon and dinner should be
made with Mr. Brennan, Bureau
of Appointments.

by
SAND LER
,OF BOSTON

From College to Career
Many college girls have won important
first jobs as Gibbs-trained secretaries.
Wrife Colhege Course Deat Jor catalog
Katharine Gibbs
230 Park Ave., NEW YORK 17 33 Plymouth St., MONTCLAIR
51 E. Superior St., CHICAGO 11 155 Angell St., PROVIDENCE 6
90 Marlborough St., BOSTON 16

Isay there.
It's the
l I Jl~;I
01
4=Ii ~ a _jty.~

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British mannered ... here's
a scoop pump for the busiest,
fastest-moving feet in town.
No speed limits and plenty of
fashion appeal, just wait
'til you step into this shoe.

So

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Ph. 7177

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What a wonderful feeling. It floats!

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$895

VAN BOVEN SHOES
17 Nickels Arcade

TO DAY'S
SPECIAL
Baked Beans
with
Salt Pork
Cole Slaw
Roll & Butter
Coffee or Tea
MEAL TICKETS
on Sale
$5.00 value for $4.50
45c Special

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Hear the New Long-Play
RCA VICTORRECORDS
Superb Fidelity On Silent Vinylite Surfaces,
These Sets Are Available On 3313 RPM or 45 RPM
SYMPHONY NO. 7 IN A (BEETHOVEN)
Boston Symphony-Charles Munch

WELL-TEMPERED CLAVIER (Prel.-Fugues)
Wanda Landowska, Harpsichordist

(J. S. Bach)

SWAN LAKE BALLET (TCHAIKOWSKY)
St. Louis Symphony-Golsc'hmann
MASS IN B MINOR (J. S. BACH)
RCA Victor Chorale-R. Shaw
SIEGFRIED: ACT 111, SCENE III (WAGNER)
Farrell, Svanholm, Roch. Phil.-Leinsdorf
CONCERTO NO. 2 IN C MINOR (RACHMANINOFF)
Rubinstein, NBC Sym.-Golschmann
ETUDES. OP. 10 AND 25 (CHOPIN)

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