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March 15, 1950 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-03-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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DAILY GRAPEFRUIT:
Tigers Whip Yanks, 3-l;
Giants Edge Tribe, 5-3

By The Associated Press
Effective hurling by three De-
troit moundsmen gave the Tigers
a 3-1 victory over the New York
Yankees in the first 1950 meeting
'between the two clubs, an exhibi-
tion game at St. Petersburg, Flor-
ida yesterday.
Ray Herbert, Hal Newhouser
and Fred Hutchinson combined to
limit the World Champions to six
hits, while their mates were
combing Fred Sanford for all of
their runs in the second inning.
HERBERT, formerly a Detroit
high school hurler, allowed only
nine Yankees to come to the plate
during his three inning stint.
Newhouser in his first appearance
of the spring season worked two
innings and was touched for two
singles and the lone New York
tally.
Former Bomber Dick Kry-
hoski was the Tiger batting star,
driving in a pair of runs with a
triple. A single by Bob Swift sent
Kryhoski home.
Hutchinhon blanked the Yank-
ees through the last four innings,
limiting them to two hits. Joe Di-
Maggio who was sidelined last
Sunday with a blistered right heel
was out of the lineup for the third
straight game but was reported in
good shape again after a morning
workout.
* * *
AT PHOENIX, Arizona, the New
York Giants blasted four Cleve-
land pitchers for 15 hits and a 5-3
triumph over the Indians.
Rookies Dick Adair and Roger
Bowman held the American
leaguers to one run during- the
first six innings. Larry Doby
clouted a second inning homer
for the tally off Adair.
The Giants reeled off four
double-plays in the contest. Eddie
Stanky sparked the club's three
run first inning with a two bagger,
one of- three Stanky hits.
,r

IN CALIFORNIA the two Chi-
cago teams broke even for their
efforts as the Cubs gained an easy
8-2 victory over the St. Louis
Browns, while the White Sox were
losing to Pittsburgh by a score of
12-7.
The Cubs teed off for 11 hits,
including three doubles by vet-
eran second-sacker Emil Ver-
ban and a single and triple by
rookie third baseman Ransom
Jackson. Bob Borkowski, Chica-
go centerfielder, drove in three
runs.
The Pale Hose were victims of a
four-ply Pirate home run barrage,
one by Ralph Kiner in the first
inning. It was his third in four
exhibition contests. Wally West-
lake, Nanny Fernandez and Dale
Coogan got the other Pittsburgh
circuit clouts.
In the fourth inning Kiner
sprained his wrist in a collision
with Herm Reich at first base and
had to leave the game.
THE ST. LOUIS Cardinals over-
came a three run deficit to down
the Braves, 5-3, for the second
victory in as many days over the
Boston National Leaguers at
Bradenton, Florida.
Eddie Waitkus, Philadelphia
Phillies first baseman, em-
phasized his return to - big
league baseball by hitting a two-
run homer in the first inning,
but his team eventually lost to
the Cincinnati Reds, 7-5, at
Clearwater, Florida.
It was the Phils' third defeat in
four exhibition games so far. Ron
Northey, Red outfielder, matched
Waitkus with a two-run blast in
the third and finished the day
with a four-for-four record at the
plate.
Held to two hits, both singles by
Wayne Belardi, rookie first base-
man, the Brooklyn Dodgers still
managed to beat their farmhands
of the Mobile Alabama club by
scoring three runs in the ninth
inning for a 4-1 triumph at Vero
Beach, Florida.
Bill Peters gave up a scoring hit
to Belardi in the fourth for an un-
earned run that tied the score,
and Mario Fricano was clipped for
the second Belardi blow in the
ninth.

49-47 Win
Gives Dukes
LaSalle Tilt
NEW YORK - (P) - Aroused
City College of New York, get-
ting an All-America perform-
ance from big Ed Warner, shov-
ed heavily favored Kentucky to
the sidelines last night, 89-50,
in a stunning quarter-final of
the National Invitation Basket-
ball Tournament.
NEW YORK - ()- Duquesne
'University grabbed a thrilling 49-
47 victory over LaSalle of Philadel-
phia last night to enter the semi-
finals of the National Invitation
Basketball Tournament at Madi-
son Square Garden.
A crowd of some 17,000 watched
the see-saw battle, which saw the
Iron Dukes from Pittsburgh play
37 minutes with their starting five,
and clinch the verdict on a super-
lor performance from the foul line.
* * *
DUQUESNE meets the winner
of last night's second game be-
tween Kentucky and City College
of New York in the semi-finals
Thursday night. In the other semi-
final, Bradley-the Nation's No. 1
team-plays St. John's of Brook-
lyn. The finals will be played Sat-
urday night.
Trailing with five minutes to
go, La Salle pulled into a three-
point advantage at 44-41 with 3
minutes and 20 seconds to play,
but the Dukes wouldn't give up.
Steve Skendrovich converted two
free throws, and 6-5 Chuck Cooper
got another pair of charity tosses
to put the Dukes in front.
Then Art Goldberg sank a one-
hander from the side, and Cooper
dropped in two more free throws,
to make it 49-46. LaSalle's Newt
Jones converted a free toss in the
final minute, and Dukes froze the
ball for the last 25 seconds.
Larry Foust, LaSalle's 6-9 cen-
ter, missed four free throws in
the final three minutes.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the second
in a series of articles on the partici-
pating teams in the NCAA national
hockey championship playoffs at Col-
orado Springs this weekend.)
By JIM PARKER
Colorado College's hockey squad
will be seeking its first NCAA
championship playoff win when
the Tigers meet Boston College
in the tournament opener tomor-
row night.
In the two previous national
tourneys, the Coloradians came
out on the short end of the score
three times. In 1948, the inaug-
ural year of the NCAA ice cham-
pionships, the Tigers dropped an
8-4 decision to Dartmouth and
the next year lost to Boston Col-
lege, 7-3, and to Michigan, 10-4,
in the consolation game.
* * *
THIS YEAR, Colorado posted
one of the finest season records
in the Tigers' history by winding
up its 1949-50 schedule with 16
wins, five losses and one tie to
win its third straight bid to the
national playoffs.
Over the season, the Bengals
have scored a total of 167 goals
while allowing their opponents
Icers Take Off
Michigan's hockey team will
leave Willow . un Airport at
1:45 this afternoon for the
NCAA hockey playoffs at Colo-
rado Springs this week-end.
The Wolverines will board
the same plane carrying the
Boston University and Boston
College squads who are leaving
Boston this morning.
83 for an offensive average of
7.6 goals per game against their
foes' 3.8.
Sparking a well-balanced of-
fensive attack has been center
Harry Whitworth, whose season

PIKE'S PEAK PUCKST ERS:
Colorado Seeks Fir4t Ice Playoff Win

m

JIM STARRAK
... offensive defender
* * *
total of 49 points established him
as the Tigers' all-time leading
scorer with 155 points in four
years of play.
* * .
FLANKING WHITWORTH on
the Bengal first line, Coach Ched-
dy Thompson has Cris Ray and
Ron Hartwell with 39 and 35
points respectively. Thompson al-
so has two alternate forwards
with 30 or more points in center
Tony Frasca and wingman Andre
Gambucci.
The two centers, Whitworth
and Fraska, were the only two
Coloradians who were able to
crash into the scoring column
in the Tigers' double loss (5-1
and 11-1) to the Wolverines late
last month.
Juniors Jim Starrak and Mike

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