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February 18, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-02-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Hei fetzTo
Play Here
Tomorrow
Returning this season to the
American concert platform after
an absence of over a year, Jascha
Heifetz will present a violin recital
at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow in Hill Au-
ditoriumn.
Heifetz warned before his va-
cation that he was "going to take
his engine apart and put it to-
gether again."
The Russian-born violinist said
that he had played some works
so often in recent years that he
found it hard not to play them
without thinking,
* ., *
SEVERAL weeks ago, after his
return to Carnegie Hall, New York
critics decided that the old Heifetz
engine was still hard to beat.
At forty-seven, Heifetz has
forty years of concert playing
behind him.
He made his American debut
in 1917, but he had already
marked a couple of other pre-
mieres; his first lesson at three
and his Russian debut at. seven.
Tickets for his concert here are
on sale at the University Musical
Society's Offices, Burton Tower.
Officers Elected
L. C. Burch was elected presi-
dent of the senior class in the
Law School's annual election last
Friday.
Wells T. Lovett was elected vice-
president, Arthuar H. Northrup,
secretary, and William J. McKen-
na, treasurer.-
earnings on our

HAIL THE UNSUNG HERO:
Fritz Blitzes University Parking Tie.,p

Elmer Fritz is one of the unsung
heroes of the perennial University
parking problem.
Bedecked in police coat, toa
boots and ear muffs during the
cold months, he can be found be-
hind the new General Administra-
tion Building keeping the parking
lot free of traffic jams.
THE JOB isn't anything new
to him however; he handled the
parking situation at the Univer-I
sity Hall lot for eight years be-
fore the administration moved to
its new quarters.
"But there are more cars at
the new spot," he reports, trot-
ting out to direct a misguided
student motorist.
With one half the lot limited to
60 cars holding permits and the
other half to 15 minute parking,
his work keeps him busy.
YET, HE still finds time out for
friendly relations with the rest of
the staff, and hails the adminis-
trative workers as "just like oneI
big happy family."
Although an Ann Arbor resident
all his life, Michigan weather
seems pretty cold to him, and he
keeps a pair of ear muffs handy.
The only drawback of the
new lot is the fact that he no
longer sees manw of the class-
ward bound students with whom
he used to exchange morning
greetings.
Be it warm or cold, however,
there is always a smile or a twin-
kle of the eye for the passer-by.

Diplomas il,
New Grads
More than 1.400 students who
cnmpleted requirements for de-
grees at the end of thc Fall semes-
ter are now being mn ilod t heir di-
plomas.
Diploma Clerk Mrs. Lou 11.
Ransom reported yesterday that
the number of students this Feb-
ruary, 1A12, is 20 less than quali-
fied at the same time last year.
FORTY-FOUR of the students
graduated with distinction, in-
cluding Edward D. McNeill, Mich-
igan football end.
The number of graduates by
schools and colleges were as fol-
lows:
Graduate School, 382; literary
college, 337; engineering college,
258; business administration,
school, 198; Law School, 104; edu-
cation school, 33; architecture
school, 30; forestry school, 29;
music school, 23; public health
school, 16, and pharmacy college,
2.
There were no February gradu-
ates in the Medical School, School
of Dentistry, and School of Nurs-
ing.
Club Elects
The Polonia Club, an organiza-
tion composed of students of for-
eign descent, recently elected the
following officers.:
Don Binkowski, '51, president;
Joe Czesnakowicz, '51E, vice-pres-
ident; Florence Bedul, '52, secre-
tary; Richard Zylowski, '51E,
treasurer; Norbert Podgorski, '51,
social chairman.

N ever
Sefore

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a pen

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compe tely
s atisfying

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ill

new

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Daily--Ohlinger
PARKING PROBLEM-Student drivers approaching the General
Administration Building from the back are liable to meet con-
genial Elmer Fritz, University police, assigned to keeping the
parking situation under control.

I'I
NEW ... FOTO-FILL FILLER ... vIsIBLl INK
SUPPLY . .. PLI-GLASS RESERVOIR ... rLATHE-
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M

Prof. Hall Views Rebuilding
Of Philippine 'U' Campus_

bonus savings

plan

Ask about it

By JACKIE OLIVER
Michigan's sister college-The
University of the Philippines-is
an agency for cementing friend-
ship between America and the Is-
lands, according to Prof. Robert
Hall.
Prof. Hall, who has just re-
turned to his duties in the geo-
graphy department after six
months service as consultant to
the Supreme Commander Allied
Powers in the Far East, spent
some time in Manila inspecting
the war-torn college.
HE CALLED it "an extremely
optimistic venture on a grand
scale." Virtually destroyed during
World War II, the Philippine Uni-
versity is being rebuilt with the
assistance of the University of
Michigan.
It now stands on a thousand-
acre tract donated by the Phil-
lippine government, which gives
it ". . . probably the largest
campus in the world," Pirof.
Hall said.
"We are shipping books by the

tons, instead of the titles. The
first building will be the Joseph
Ralston Hayden Memorial Lib-
rary which will dominate the
campus.
PROF. HALL is chairman of
tie committee in charge of the
library. Other committee mem-
bers are Warner Rice, librarian of
the General Library; William W.
Bishop, librarian emeritus; and
Prof. Harley Bartlett of the bot-
any department.
A drive for the library began
April 14, 1947 after the Student
Government had adopted the
university as a "sister institu-
tion" in 1946.
A Tag Day drive beginning Oc-
tober 15, 1948 aimed to collect
$50,000 for books.
S*k *t
APPROXIMATELY 4000 stud-
ents are living in temporary
dwellings built by the govern-
ment, said Prof. Hall.
There are plans for botanical
gardens, faculty houses and per-
manent residence halls.

Assign Rank
To Seventeen
NROTC Men
NROTC has completed the ad-
vancement in rank of seventeen
students and graduates.
At official ceremonies in North
Hall, four NROTC graduates were
commissioned as Ensigns, USNR.
THE FOLLOWING men, all re-
cent recipients of baccalaureate
degrees in Naval Science, were
awarded the commissions:
Charles Henry Doherty III,
'49E; Hiram G. Gilbert, '49E;
Jordon H. Greene, '49E; and
John G. Walls, '50L.
Oaths were administered by
Capt. H. B. Wheeler, USN, of the
naval science department.
THIRTEEN CAMPUS NROTC
members have been appointed new
Officers of the Student Corps for
the spring semester.
The slate includes:
Lt. Comdr. Norman L. Pol-
lard, '49E, Battalion Comman-
der; Lt. Orlie G. Baird, '49, Bat-
talion Sub-Commander; Lt.
JG Stanley M. Saulson, Adju-
tant; Ensign Leslie M. Bagnall,
'50 E, Battalion Lieutenant;
CPO Richard A. Hall, '51 BAd.,
Battalion CPO; Lt. Kenneth E.
Thorp, '49E, 1st Company Com-
mander; Lt. Ralph M. Burton,
. 2nd Company Commander.
The following Platoon Leaders
were chosen :
Lt. JGS F. M. Murphy, '50; H.
V. Berry, '50E; A. H. Kermath,
'50E; James E. Ely, R. L. Isaacson,
'50; and R. G. Gresla, '41E.
Unstable Men
NEW YORK-Evidently men
are less able to face the problems
of life than are women. The
World Book Encylopedia says
three or four times as many men
as women commit suicide every
year.

G ET set for surprises! You'll find
plenty of them in the New Parker
"51". For this pen has 14 remarkable
new advances.
Filling is extra fast and easy. A spe-
cial window lets you see the ink sup-
ply. The New "51" holds more ink,
too. And this pen is safeguarded against
leaking, even at highest flight levels.
But there's much more. So try it
yourself. See the New "51" today at
your Parker dealer's. The Parker Pen
Company, Janesville, Wisconsin
U. S. A., and Toronto, Canada.

t
t

11V

7avr. 1949 by The Parker Peu CoiP~wW . ny

E~ EE. Read... and Use Daily Classified Ads
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Hill Auditorium, Friday, Feb.

25, 8 P.M.

Only at Lyon & Healy can you
find such a wealth of material
on every phase of Sheet Music
and Musical Literature_
books and folios for beginner,
advanced student and. artist
from catalogues to all leading
ublishe . musicr fornry

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