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May 21, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-05-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SIX TiIEMICIIIAN itty

TOO PERSONAL:
Critic Hits Modern Art's
Lack of Universal Symbols

4 --

By JOAN KATZ
Modern artists have failed to
achieve any one central symbol in
their work, except personal style
Lincoln Kirstein, noted New Yorl
art critic, declared in his talk here
yesterday.
"Lacking universal symbolism,
each transitory movement of the
last fifty yearshas gone into in-
dustrial art," he said. "Thus, the
abstract work of Mondrian has
become the inspiration for linol-
eum design."
* * *

,

the artist has become "com-
pietely disenfranchised-he has
no one, to work for," Kirstein
said. "The successful artist to-
day is so personalized that he
can create only a symbol for
you, not for us."

USING SLIDES to illustrate his
lecture, "Modern Art-Search for
a Symbol," Kirstein pointed to
Dali's well-known "Persistence of
Memory" as typical of the substi-
tution of devices for symbols in
modern paintings. The picture's
limp watches show Dali's use of
the device of the dream formula
in which things lose their sub-
stance, rather than his attainment
of a universal symbol, the critic
declared.
Since the French Revolution,

He pointed to Picasso's work as
an example of this "symbol auto-
biography," terming many of his
paintings as "aesthetic monumen-
tal pieces of boredom."
* * *
THE MODERN ARTIST has "a
double obligation" in the museum
and the camera, Kirstein said.
"The artist can no longer be inno-
cent of what was done or how it
was done."
Kirstein showed the work of
Pavel Tchelitchew as an example
of modern painting with a pro-
phecy. "In rediscovering the hu-
man organism, this artist is among
those few who are attempting to
show what the world is today, and
could be," the critic declared.

West Quad
Holds Photo
Competition
A group of 49 pictures taken by
West Quad camera enthusiasts are
on display in the men's residence
in a competitive contest sponsored
by the West Quad Camera Club.
Featuring every type of photog-
raphy from scenic stills to student-
life shots, the 49 entries are cur-
rently hanging in the first floor
concourse of the Quad.
* * *
INCLUDED IN THE exhibition
are unusual examples of photo-
graphic artistry including gurgling
babies, campus scenes, portrait
stickers and pictures of the Detroit
skyline.
Peter Mann, '51, president of the
Camera Club said that first and
second prizes will be awarded to-
morrow in each of the four divi-
sions: portrait, pictorial, land-
scape and open class. In addition
there will be an award for the
photograph adjudged to be the
most outstanding of the exhibit.

Shining Colors
Introduce '49
Forestry Book
Resplendent in a shining yellow
and black cover, the- Michigan
Forester, yearbook of the School
of Forestry and Conservation, is
now being distributed.
Published by the Foresters Club,
this year's issue is edited by Ter-
ence J. Brille, '49, and Edward A.
Reid, '49.
Along with the pictures and
write-ups of the graduating class,
the Forester contains a review of
the year's activities in the For-
estry and Conservation School.
Issues may be purchased in Rm.
2052 Natural Science Building for
$1.00.

Lucille Watson, imperial lady of
stage and screen will star in
Emlyn Williams' thrilling melo-
drama "Night Must Fall," the
third production of the Drama
Festival opening at 8:30 p.m.
Tuesday in Lyydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
The play which enjoyed tre-
mendous popularity in London
where it first opened, unfolds the
story of a unsuspected, psycho-
pathic young murderer let loose
in an English countryhome.
MISS WATSON, famous for her
biting and witty interpretations
of domineering old women, plays
the role of Mrs. Bramson, a can-
tankerous old lady with hypoohon-
driac tendencies.

Included among her many
noteworthy performances are
those in "Pride and Prejudice,"
"Yes, My Darling Daughter" and
"Watch on the Rhine." She has
appeared in screen versions of
"The Women," "Rage in Heav-
en," and "Waterloo Bridge." At
present she is appearing as Aunt
March in the current film
"Little Women."
Donald Buka, who plays the role
of the murderer, has appeared in
"Idiot's Delight," "Amphytrion
38," "The Corn Is Green" and
"Taming of the Shrew."

STARRING LUCILLE WATSON:
'Night Must Fall' To Open Tuesday

Tickets
a.m. to 4
of Lydia

are available from 10
p.m. at the box office
Mendelssohn.

PHILIP TONGE and Neva Pat-
terson at present appearing in
"Twelfth Night" complete the cast
with Jon Dawson, Mary Jackson,
Jennifer Howard and June Madi-
son.
"Night Must Fall" is directed
by Valentine Windt. Robert Mel-
lencanip is art director, Emma
Ilirsh Mellencamp, costumlere,
and Joseph Leon, stage man-
ager.

1r 1 \\f l ,

.P.-%

FLAG OF ISRAEL-The blue
and white flag of Israel flies
from its staff on the grounds of
UN headquarters at Lake Suc-
cess. The flag of the UN's new-
est member was raised following
the admission of Israel to the
United Nations.
Atomic Power
Story Sparks
JuneTechnic

A Classified Ad Can Sell Unused Items for Yob

f

I - L * - L * - L

*t

Keep Your Money Safe!

u PE
pP
..and tis, Chief, is the gr eat
invention that breaks in the
Dr. Grabow pipe of peace",

By Everett Esch

A

.........
C.- -.

#/w'j!
//ann'/!

EVERYBODY'S Running to the
m xf,
1313 South University

aq$
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"ITr
'r

Going Home for the
Summer

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Applications of atomic power to
high speed aircraft is one of the
problems discussed in the June
issue of The Technic, slated to go
on sale early next week.
An explanation of how atomic
fuel can increase the range of air-
craft travelling at supersonic
speeds is given to DavesPeterson,
'49E, in an article "Atomic Power
for Aircraft."
PROBLEMS concerned with the
conversion of basic powerplants to
atomic fuel consumption, the use
of jet and rocket engines and tem-
perature and radiation control are
also discussed.
In "Magnetron Testing", Prof.
Van den Brock of the engineer-
ing school develops a formula
for the bending of columns.
The article also discusses re-
search development at the Univer-
sity.
A new feature, "Technic Re-
flects" will be initiated in the en-
gineering magazine. The June is-
sue will discuss the life of Helm-
holtz Faranite, one of America's
greatest inventors.
'U' Telescope
Goes to Briton
LONDON - (A) - Trustees of a
University of Michigan fund have
given one of the largest reflecting
telescope mirrors in the world to
the Royal Greenwich Observatory,
the Admiralty said recently.
The 90-inch reflector will be in-
stalled in the new Isaac Newton
telescope, to be erected by the ob-
servatory at Herstmanceux, south
of London.
The Mirror was originally
bought by the McGregor fund for
a proposed new reflecting tele-
scope at the Ann Arbor, Mich., In-
stitution, but plans for the project
were cancelled, a spokesman said.
Appoint Crawford
Dean Ivan C. Crawford of the
engineering college has been ap-
pointed a consultant to the Service
Academy Board by the office of
the Secretary of Defense.
The cffice has set up the board
to recommend a general system of
basic education which is best
adapted to provide all three serv-
ices with a sufficient number of
young men qualified to meet the
needs of the regular armed serv-
ices."

"
" 1"
a
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i

University Branch

- 330 S. State

When
Traveling
Use

IT

. .

I

4L

i

I

T-
t\
"You understand, of course, under ad
flying conditions you would ignore the
edge of the blackboard."
Why Not Start
Flying This Weekend?
Just $6 gets you in the
air for your first lesson.

.'=

.4

.... ,.

Daily

suggestions

for

Dinling

TRAVELER'S CHECKS
The Safest and most Convenient
way to carry your Money.
ANN AnRBOn BANK

No Breaking in
No Biate
No Bitter Taste
/SEE
it's Pre-Smowed
UNION
MADE
BRIAR
Fashioned by Linkman
DR. GRABOW PIPE CO. INC., CHICAGO 14 ILL

a t

(Selling Out To The Bare Fixtures)
D ARTLE ST ODAY

HERE IS YOUR GUIDE
To Finer Eating in Ann Arbor
Patronize These Establishments
Metzger's Restaurant
Where Good Food Insures
Your Health and Our Success
Domestic Beers and Wines
203 E. Washington Phone 9126

Sandwiches.. Soups..

Ice Cream

and Baked Goods
409 EAST JEFFERSON ST.

PAUL'S LUNCH

Sea Food Specialties at
Liberty Fish & Chips
Restaurant
301 E. Liberty
Hours 11 A.M. - 12 P.M. 'tit 1 A.M. Fri. & Sat.

See Bargain List in Tomorrow's Paper

11

COTTAGE IINN THE FARM CUPBOARD'
WE SERVE THE BEST FOOD IN TOWN
Specializing in - Specializing in FRIED CHICKEN DINNERS
SFIAKSANDCCHOPS SOCK SERDVRE Open Daily I1 A.M. to 9 P.M., Except Monday
Special Club Breakfasts - New Lower Priced Lunches
512 EAST WILLIAMS PHONE 5902 5400 Plymouth Rd. (on the way to Detroit) Phone 9387
Just a few steps from camous_________________________________
A'!3 Meals a Day for $1.50
Open Daily 18 Meals a Week . . . $9.00
7 A.M. - 12:00 P.M. Meal Tickets Available Daily at . .
J. D. MILLER'S CAFETERIA .. . 211 S. State St.

O £Ile 'n. . . if you don't get in on the Special Q
CPLL EGE END SHOE SA LE
at thea
CAMPUS BOOTERY
304 South State_
10 IO-m5%-20%4
to 50% OFFV
v FF J

The LANTERN GARDEN
Near Michigan Theatre
Delicious Meals at Reasonable Prices
Chinese and American Cuisine
Closed on Mondays
PHONE 6380 FOR ORDERS TO TAKE OUT

#teal ap Ift Ca etepia
--- DAILY SPECIALS .--
Breakfast, Monday thru Friday, 7-10 A.M.
Lunch 1 1 to 1 :30 ... Dinner 5 to 7:00
Sunday 12 to 2:30 and 5 to 7:00
Thru the Arcade - 338 Maynard Street
T HE T OP P ER
Open 24 Hours a Day
FREE DELIVERY
from 8 P.M. 4 A.M.

THE BETSY ROSS SHOP
Nickels Arcade
Saturday 7:30 - 2:30
Open 7:30 - 4:30 Monday thru Friday

II

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11

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