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May 21, 1949 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-05-21

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ThDAYI MAY 21, 1949 .THE MICANDVAM

PAGE TS1

Wolverines Qualify Six
In Big Nine Track Meet
Barten, Thomason, Lindquist, Kirkendall,
Sergeson, Mitchell Place in Preliminaries
_ 4

Michigan, Broncos

Battle

to 3-3

Draw

~4~

By BILL CONNOLLY ,
(Special to The Daily)
EVANSTON - Michigan quali-
fied six men, four of them in the
half-mile, as Minnesota and In-
diana placed 13 each in the pre-
liminary heats here yesterday to
rank as co-favorites for today's
49th annual Western Conference
outdoor track championship.
Ohio State stayed in the fight
Ny placing eight men, while Pur-
due ranged fourth with seven.
Illinois was tied with the Wolver-
ines with six qualifiers as Wiscon-
sin placed five men and North-
western and Iowa placed four and
one respectively.
THE WOLVERINES surprised
the field by placing four men in
the 880. In the firsth eat, won by
Wisconsin's greatiDon Gehrmann,
John Lindquist finished third be-
hind Don Washington of Ohio
State. Gehrmann's winning time
of 1:56.7 was the best of the day.
Herb Barten won his heat in
1:57.9. He was buried in the
pack all the way around the
first lap and was forced to drop
behind the whole field of eight
runners to get into position af-
ter being boxed in. He passed
seven men in the last 220 yards
of the race and sprinted down
the stretch to snap the tape.
In the other half-mile heat, won
by Mal Whitfield of OSU, Mich-
igan placed Bob Thomason and
Garth Kirkendall. Thomason ran
a fine race and finished second
to the Buckeye. Kirkendall faded
n the back stretch of the last lap,
Wt finished strong on the final
0 to qualify.
IN TIW QUARTER MILE,
opening event of the day, Mich-
igan placed only Bob Sergeson,
finishing second to Bob Mansfield

of Wisconsin, who ran the quarter
in :50.4.
Jim Mitchell, star sophomore
hurdler, ran the best time of his
career as he won his heat of
the high hurdles in :14.6.
The Maize and Blue failed to
qualify anyone in the sprints and

Netmen Face
OSU in Final
Dual Contest
By JOHN BARBOUR
Limping from an 8-1 defeat by
Northwestern last Saturday, Ohio
State's netmen bring a seven win
-four loss record to the Ferry
Field courts at 10:00 this morning
as they face unbeaten Michigan
in the last dual meet of the Wol-
verine's netdseason.
Only one man on the Ohio
squad has an unbeaten record this
year. He is Dave Kuenzli at the
number five singles post, and has
ten wins in ten starts.
WOLVERINE ACE Andy Paton
comes up against Buckeye number
one man Arnie Levenstein who
forced Grant Golden of North-
western into three sets last week
but dropped the match to him,
6-2, 4-6, 6-2.
Al Hetzeck at number two
for the Wolverines faces Guy
Blair at that post for the Bucks.
Blair tried to fight off Ted Hain-
line of the Wildcat squad last
week but didn't have enough as
Hainline pulled by, 6-4, 9-7.
Lenny Schiff at number three
singles for the Buckeyes serves to
Wolverine Fred Otto, while Otto's
teammate, Bill Mikulich at num-
ber four, puts his game against
Dick Slager of OSU.
GORDIE NAUGLE, playing
number six singles for Michigan
faces the last Buck netman, Jim
Jones.
Ohio's coach Herman Wirth-
wein put his number one and
number five men, Levenstein
and Kuenzli, up as his number
one doubles combo. They gave
Northwestern's Golden and
Hainline a fight last week in
three hard driving sets but lost,
6-4, 8-10, 10-8.
Paton and Mikulich are Mich-
igan Coach Bill Murphy's choices
to face Wirthwein's number one
duo, while Murphy's number twc
match features Hetzeck and Otto.
Blair and Schiff are up for OSUJ
in the number two spot, and Sla-
ger and Bill Dillon at number
three. Michigan's number three
combo sports MacKay and Naugle.

Game Halted in Twelfth
On Account of Darkness

HERB BARTEN
. . . qualifies in 880
Indiana placed three in the 100
and two in the 220 to strengthen
their title bid.
* * *
MICHIGAN lost out in the low
hurdles when Don Hoover, leading
his heat with only about thirty
yards to go, was nosed out at the
tape by Jim Neilson of the Goph-
ers and Bill Garrett of the Hoos-
iers.
The finals, this afternoon are
still wide open, however, with
Minnesota and Indiana ranked as
a toss-up for victory and Ohio
State as a close contender.

(Special to The Daily)
KALAMAZOO - Michigan's
baseball squad battled the West-
ern Michigan Broncos to a 12 in-
ning, 3-3, deadlock in a non-
league contest here yesterday af-
ternoon.
The game was finally called on
account of darkness after three
hours of play.
* * *
RAY FISHER used three pitch-
ers in the lengthy contest which
was the second of the season be-
tween the two teams. Eddie Gren-
kowski started for the Maize and
Blue and allowed 13 hits in the
first eight innings of play, but
managed to put out the fire sev-
eral times.
Dave Settle pitched the ninth
and tenth while Bob Hicks fin-
ished the game.
The Wolverines travel to East
Lansing today to meet the Michi-
Nu Sigma Nu beat Phi Delta
Phi, 5-1, yesterday to clihen the
professional fraternity softball
title. This gave Nu Sig the all
professional fraternity cham-
pionship for the fourth consec-
utive year.
gan State Spartans. Bud Rankin
will probably do the hurling for
Michigan in the game scheduled to
start at three.
WESTERN DREW first blood in
yesterday's contest scoring one run
in the first inning on Robert Pol-
lard's single, a sacrifice, and Cap-
tain Dick Groggel's two base hit.
Michigan rebounded to tie
the score with a run in the sec-
ond frame. Jack McDonald
walked, Bob Wolff singled, and a
wild pitch advanced both run-
ners. A walk to Ralph Morisson
loaded the bases and another
pass to Captain Hal Raymond
forced the run across.
Sophomore Gerald Hogan then
replaced starter Gene Schlukebir
and forced Grenkowski to hit into
a double play and Willard Baker
to ground out. Hogan yielded six
hits during the remainder of the
game.

SCORING ANOTHER run in
the seventh on a fielder's choice, a
single by Bill Bucholz, and a
Bronco error, the Wolverines took
the lead for the only time of the
day.
The Broncos tied the score
with a counter in their half of
the seventh on two singles sand-
wiched around a sacrifice bunt.
Hogan'sbsingle and a resound-
ing triple by Pollard in the eighth
accounted for another Bronco run
and gave Western a 3-2 lead.
MICHIGAN STAVED off defeat
by pushing across the tying run
in the ninth frame when Raymond
worked Hogan for a walk, stole
second, and rode home on Baker's
single.
The Wolverines collected eight
hits during the 12 innings of
play while Western garnered 16
safeties.
Baker and Wolff paced the
Michigan attack with two singles
apiece while Raymond connected
for the only extra-base hit, a
blooping double in the seventh.
Fencers Battle
In Cleveland
Fencers from seven states will
converge on Cleveland today where
the midwest open championships
start, lasting over the weekend un-
til tomorrow.
Michigan's Scimitar Club is
represented in foil by Ed Micllef
and Peter Young who took second
and third respectively, in last
week's State open tourney.
* *
BY KRIEGER defending champ,
who last week took the state foil
crown for the second year in a row,
will be on hand attempting to re-
tain his title.
His chief competition should
come from Micllef and Young
since Michigan fencers usually
dominate midwestern foil.
Two members of the United
States Olympic fencing team are
on hand for the competition. Don
Thompson of the University of
Chicago and Ed Wolf of Lcuisville
will compete in epee.

Maj or
League
L auBaseball
By The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA-Ferris Fain's
single with one out drove Eddie
Joost in with the winning run in
the tenth inning as the Philadel-
phia Athletics advanced within a
half game of second place in de-
feating Detroit, 2-1, last night.
WASHINGTON - Washington
clustered six of its eight hits in
the first three innings last night to
defeat the St. Louis Browns, 5-3,
behind the 7-hit pitching of Sid
Hudson.
CINCINNATI-Lefty Montia
Kennedy turned in his fourth
triumph and second shutout of
the season yesterday as he
pitched the New York Giants to
a brilliant two-hit 5-0 triumph
over the Cincinnati Reds.
PITTSBURGH - Bill Werle,
southpaw rookie, pitched the Pitts-
burgh Pirates to a 2-1 win over
the Boston Braves last night be-
fore a crowd of 29,807.
ST. LOUIS-The St. Louis
Cardinals finally found their
batting eyes tonight and pound-
ed out a 6 to 2 victory over the
Brooklyn Dodgers to the delight
of 22,600 fans.
BOSTON-Pitcher Bob Feller
was taken off the starting staff of
the Cleveland Indians yesterday
and assigned, at least temporarily,
to bull pen duty.
Conference Rules
Rehfeldt Eligible
EVANSTON, Ill.-(A)--The Big
Nine faculty representatives yes-
terday ruled that basketball center
Don Rehfeldt of Wisconsin is eli-
gible for a fourth season next win-
ter. Rehfeldt led Conference scor-
ers last year with 219 points.
Redfeldt enrolled at Wisconsin
July 1, 1944, and played the 1944-
45 season until Feb. 1, 1945, after
which he received Army orders.
He returned to Wisconsin Febru-
ary, 1947 finishing out the 1946-47
season, and played the 1947-48
and 1948-49 seasons.

Wolverine Tars To Sail
Against Best in Midwest

By JACK BERGSTROM
The Michigan Sailing Club will
play host to the top sailors of
this area in the Midwest Cham-
pionship Regatta today and to-
morrow at Whitmore Lake.
The three schools taking the
top positions in this regatta will
represent the Mid-West in the
Nationals which are to be held at
Whitmore Lake June 21, 22, and
23.
* * .
REPRESENTING the Michigan
area will be Michigan, Michigan
State, and Purdue. These are the
three schools who took top honors
at the Mid-west Eliminations two
weeks ago at Whitmore Lake.
The three top teams from the
Ohio area are: Ohio State, Ohio
Wesleyand,, and Ohio University.
The Chicago area will be rep-
resented by Notre Dame, North-
western University, and the Uni-
versity of Chicago.
* * *
PURDUE RANKS as the current
favorite by virtue of their wins at
both Michigan Invitational, and
the Mid-West Eliminations re-
gatta.
But the Wolverine sailors have

given Purdue a close race both
times they met this season, los-
ing one regatta by a slim one
point margin.
Michigan which is aiming to
repeat as. Mid-West champion will
be making a determined bid to
break the Boilermaker jinx.
SKIPPERING THE Wolverine
entries tomorrow will be Ray
Kauffman and Jim Johns. Both
skippers have turned in fine rec-
ords in the last three regattas in
which Michigan has competed.
Their crews will be Pat Adams
and Red Uppenheimer. Both
Miss Adams and Miss Oppen-
heimer are experienced sailors
who have ably handled most of
the crewing chores for the Wol-
verines this year.
Nine races will be sailed in the
"A" division and nine more in the
"B" division. As many races as
possible will be sailed on Saturday
with the remainder held over
until Sunday.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
By The Associated Press
Ohio State 7, Illinois 3
Indiana 4, Northwestern 2

MAN

AOW
TOWNMO

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Oper'ation(kacation

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washable, one-piece straps made of
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in mony colors.
BAY'S
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16 Nickels Arcade

BOXER or lastex swimming
trunks that are smartly styled
and made to "take it." A must
for your summer vacation. Plain
or fancy colors. 3.50 to 7.50.
SAFFELL & BUSH
310 S. State

See These
ARROW BASQUE SHIRTS
today at
W I LD'S
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a
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break this summer
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Major League Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. G.B. W L Pet. G.B.
New York ......18 11 .621 ... New York ....18 10 .643 ...
Boston ........17 12 .586 1 Detroit ........16 13 .552 21/2
Brooklyn ...... 15 14 .517 3 Philadelphia .. .16 14 .533 3
Cincinnati .....15 14 .517 3 Chisago .......15 14 .517 31
Pittsburgh . .... 14 16 .467 41 Washington ... 16 15 .516 31/2
Philadelphia . . .13 15 .464 4% Cleveland.....11 12 .478 4%
St. Louis ......11 15 .423 5'/2 Boston ........12 14 .462 5
Chicago .......10 16 .385 61% St. Louis ........9 21 .300 10

( ARDNEQRa,- /'1U lWNT
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Open-weave fabric just invites a breeze.
Long and short sleeves. In white
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C A MPU S F A VO R ITE
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OUR MODERN matched jewelry will
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touches to his spring wardrobe. For
cuff links, studs, watches, electric
shavers, pens and pensils, see
J. B. EIBLER
308 S. State
f3

Senior or Freshman-you're in
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pajamas, sportshirts, handkerchiefs;
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SMITH-CORONA typewriters, the
world's finest, are popular on every
campus. We have both standard
and portable models. Cut your
homework time in half with one of
these efficient typewriters.
O. D. MORRILL
314 S. State

WRIGHT & DITSON
Rackets keep strings
tighter longer . . . and
"FIBRE WELDING"
and "FIBRE SEALING"
give extra strength.

SPALDI NG
sets the pace in sports

mommomn

II

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