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May 18, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-05-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

W: ,,N" YI 1 1,' 15, lullu

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Ne

BfLL-ESSION
by b. s. brown, sports editor
WHO'LL BE CALLING the signals for Michigan's football squad
next year? Your guess is as good as mine. It could be any one
of the five or six candidates for the position. It could be the versatile
Wally Teninga. But as far as the Michigan coaching staff is concerned
-now that spring drills have ended-anyone could get the job.
Though the quarterback slot wasn't decided upon during the
spring workouts-or if they were, and the coaches just aren't
talking-there was a promise of happy days for one of the Wol-
verine leather-luggers. Don Dufek, who was awarded the Meyer
Morton Trophy for his work in the practice sessions, can be
counted on for some fancy cavorting next season, if precedence
means anything.
Last year, Leo Koceski copped the award, and just look at the
job he did with Michigan's undefeated squad in the '48 season. The
year before, Al Wistert took the spring honors, and'his work at tackle
in the '47 season and in the Rose Bowl made the Rock of Gibraltar
seem like a feeble pebble, in comparison. Other winners of the
award who came through in due time were Marv Pregulman, Kip
Taylor and George Ceithaml.
* * * *
WELL, TODAY'S THE DAY. Ole Casey Stengel won't be able to
resort to one of his many tricks to get him out of the jam he's
in; this is one time he'll have to make a decision, and an important
judgment it will be. Joe DiMaggio's heel is still bothering him, and
whether his playing days have ended or not is a question that may
be answered by midnight tonight. At any rate, the New York Yanks
are carrying 29 men on their roster-tonight that figure must be cut
to 25.
Will Joe be going, or will he stay? The story will soon be
told. The Maryland Mauler, Charley Keller, is in the same boat
as the Yankee Clipper. Keller's back is less dependable than a
lassie who strongly believes in female prerogatives. But Casey
has to cut his staff. This might be hail and farewell to two of
the Yank's greatest home run artists.
RAY FISHER, MICHIGAN DIAMOND PILOT, made Robin Roberts,
ace Phillp hurler, a winning pitcher, according to the star
rookie. . . Roberts tells his story in a baseball magazine which hit
the streets this month . . . The former Michigan State athlete played
for Fisher's Montpelier, Vt., team during a summer vacation . .
"You know, all the time I've been in organized baseball," Robbie says,
"I haven't heard one big leaguer or one minor leaguer give any better
advice than Fisher did . .."
The twenty-two year old rookie who struck out DiMaggio in
his first time on the mound in the major leagues (an exhibition
game during spring training) might still be playing basketball-
his first love-if Fisher hadn't "discovered" and worked with
the rising star that summer in Montpelier, the article declares.
AL KIRCHER, Michigan State's new basketball coach, is planning
quite a change in the Spartan cage attack . . . "We'll do a lot of
running next year, and we may get beaten, but I'll guarantee the
opposition will be tired . . ." Most of the Michigan cage followers
are agreed in their opinion that the Wolverines will adopt the fire-
brand type attack next year, too . . . Forsaking the slow-breaking
offense they had used all season, the Michigan cagers dut-ran Illinois,
the Conference champs, in the final game of the campaign, here,
to rack up one of the most impressive upsets of the year, 70-53.
Hetzek Springs to Net
Renown in Six Years

Drops

HOPE SPRINGS ETERNAL:
Canham Eyes Frosh for VarsitySlt

{ By BILL CONNOLLY
In the Spring a coach's
lightly turns to thoughts of
uating seniors.

fancy
grad-

-Daily--Wally Barth
GOING PLACES ... Wolverine
broad jumper and sprinter Var
Baydarian will be among the
graduating seniors this June.
Maj or League
Standing
9ge

And it's just about this time of
year that varsity track Coach Don
Canham looks witha wistful eye
towards the runners under the
direction of Elmer Swanson, fresh-
man track coach.
* *
STRONG SPOT on the frosh
squad is in the distances and in
the 880. This is good news to
Canham, because the graduation
of Captain Bob Thomason, Herbl
Barten and Fred Stoliker will
leave plenty of room for the fresh-
men to move up into competition
next Spring.
Standouts among the fresh-
men are Aaron Gordon, Don
McEwen, Bill Hickman and Ron
Packer. All four have turned in
good times in the events which
will be weakened when com-
mencement time rolls around.
IN THE 880, Barten's vacancy
will provide incentive for middle-
distance men Charles Whitaker
and Dave Edwards, who will be
competing next season with the
members of this year's Jayvee
squad who have their eyes on the
middle distance slot.
Quarter-milers Jack Heikken-
en and Lit Bachus will be fight-
ing to fill the vacancy in this
event that will be left by the
graduation of Bob Sergeson.
They will receive competition
from frosh teammates Charles
Kepler and Dave Weigel.
ONE MORE BIG HOLE in next
year's varsity will be caused by
graduation. Var Baydarian, who
last week sparked Michigan's up-
set of Illinois with his standout
performances in the broad jump
and in the century is now in his
last year of competition for the
Wolverines.
Standout performer among
the freshmen who is most likely
to fil lthis vacancy is Horace
Coleman. Although he has been
currently working mostly in the
field, Coleman can be used to fill
in the dashes as well.
Other outstanding dash-men are
Formal Rentals
SUMMER
White Coats and
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ftAAUOIPAVI

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W. L. Pet.
New York ......17 9 .654
Detroit .........15 11 .577
Philadelphia .. ..15 13 .556
Chicago ........14 13 .519
Washington .....14 14 .500
Cleveland .......10 11 .476
Boston..........11 13 .458
St. Louis........ 8 20 .286

G.B.
2
3
3 %/
4
4%
5
10

LAST NIGHT'S SCORES
Detroit 4, Washington 2.
New York 4, Cleveland 3.
Philadelphia 9, St. Louis 2.
Boston 4, Chicago 3.
* * *
NATIONAL LEAGUE

W.
New York ......16
Boston .........16
Cincinnati.....14
Brooklyn .......13
Philadelphia ... .12
Pittsburgh......12
St. Louis.......10
Chicago ........10

L.
10
10
12
13
15
15
13
15

Pet.
.615
.615
.538
.500
.444
.444
.435
.400

G.B.
2
3
41/
411
41%
51 /

By JOHN BARBOUR
From 1943 to 1949 is only six
years, but in those six years a
fourteen year-old who thought
that tennis was a sissy sport grew
to be the Sophomore number two
man on the Michigan tennis team,
Al Hetzeck.
Being number two man on a
teameas strong ashMichigan's is
no mean task in the first place,
and to make it in your first year
of varsity competition is close to
amazing.
* * *
BUT ALL stories have a begin-
ning and this one begins when the
fourteen year-old boy was beaten
in tennis by his sixteen year-old
sister. This, as every fourteen
year-old boy knows, was too much.
That was how he started ten-
nis but the story juhips now
from him to Mrs. Hoxie, the var-
sity tennis coach at Hamtramck
High in Detroit.
Mrs. Hoxie has seen young men
and women change with a racquet
in their hands from awkward kids
to smooth, consistent tennis stars.

She has turned out more young
potentials than probably any other
person in the United States.
FOR THREE YEARS Al Het-
zeck worked under the tutelage of
Mrs. Hoxie. It's one thing to prac-
tice, and another to practice the
right things.
Under her direction he won
the National Interscholastic ti-
tles and two national indoor
doubles titles. In '46 he teamed
up with Hugh Stewart to defeat
Leonard Steiner and Sydney
Schwartz, two New York boys,
in four and a half hours of
grueling, hard, indoor tennis
6-8, 8-10, 15-13, 15-13, 10-8.
While playing with Hamtramck
he copped the Metropolitan
League Championship in '45-'46.
* * *
AFTER GRADUATING from
Mrs. Hoxie and Hamtramck, he
went to Kalamazoo College where
he played for Dr. Stowe in '46 and
'47 and copped the State Singles
Junior Title both years.

LAST NIGHT'S SCORES
Pittsburgh 3. New York 2.
Brooklyn 8, Chicago 5.
Cincinnati 5, Boston 4.
Philadelphia 5, St. Louis 4.
DO YOU KNOW ... that Mich-
igan has not failed to place a foot-
ball team among the first ten top
squads of the country since 1940?

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