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May 12, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-05-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN I XMY

PA VIN

'M'ine Illai
Settle A lows Four Hits
In His First Win of Year

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a aa. aritAi ill~. .l'XaJ..s -la

LTJQI

Titans, 2-0; Netmen

Trim Irish,

7-'

Baker Bats in One Run and
Three Stolen Bases Credited

Scores Other;
to McDonald

By BOB SANDELL
A nifty four-hitter by sopho
more Dave Settle gave Michigan'
improving Wolverines a 2-0 shut
out victory over the University o
Detroit yesterday afternoon a
Ferry Field.
It was a pitching duel all the
way between the big Wolverine
righthander and Titan hurler
Gerry Ellis who was touched for
only six safe blows and one earned
run.
The Wolveines jumped to a
one run lead in the bottom of
ttie third when shortstop Bob
Wolff led off with a single to left
He stole second and romped home
when Willard Baker drilled his
second of two hits to center field
Baker had earlier dropped a two-
bagger just inside the right field
foul line to lead off in the first.
* * *
MICHIGAN tallied their other
marker in the fifth. After catcher
Hal Raymond and Settle had flied
out to the left fielder, Baker
reached first on an error by sec-
ond sacker Fred Antczak. The fleet
left fielder then stole second and
rode home on Bill Bucholz's smash
through the box.
The Wolverines threatened in
two other innings. In the fourth,
Ralph Morrison slapped a one-
bagger to left and raced all
the way to third when nobody
covered the sack on Ted Ko-
brin's sacrifice. Jack McDonald
walked, but Hal Morrill and
Wolff failed to produce.
Again in the seventh the Wol-
verines loaded the sacks on two
free passes and an error. But Ellis
bore down to slip a third strike
past Morrison, and get himself
out of a jam.
* * *
THE MOTOR CITY ball club
was a serious threat only in the
second frame when a Titan
reached third base for the only
time in the contest. Catcher John
O'Connor opened with a single to
center. Walter Maksimczk ground-
ed to Wolff, but Bucholz messed up
the toss to him that would have
started a double play. First base-
man Warren Hintz then grounded
out with O'Connor moving to third,
and Ellis also grounded out to
end the inning.
That's Settle-d
DETROIT AB R H PO A E
Boldt, ss .........3 0 0 0 4 0
Jeakle,cf......3 0 1 2 0 0
Antczak, 2b ....3 0 0 0 3 1
Orr, rf ........4 0 0 2 0 0
O'Connor, c ....4 0 1 2 1 0
Hein,if........4 0 0 5 0 0
Maksimczk, 3b ..4 0 2 3 2 1
Hintz, lb......3 0 0 10 1 0
Ellis,p........3 0 0 0 1 0
*Smith . ......1 0 0 0 0 0
TOTALS 32 0 4 24 12 2
MICIRGAN AB R H PO A E
Baker,if......4 1 2 0 0 0
Bucholz, 2b ....3 0 1 2 3 1
Dorr,2b.......0 0 0 1 0 0
Morrison,cf....4 0 1 4 0 0
Kobrin,3b.....3 0 0 4 5 1
McDonald, lb ..3 0 1 11 0 0
Morrill, rf ......3 0 0 0 0 0
Koceski, rf ....1 0 0 1 0 0
Wolff, ss......2 1 1 1 4 0
Raymond, c ....4 0 0 3 0 0
Settle, p .......3 0 0 0 1 0
TOTALS ....30 2 6 27 13 2
*-Smith grounded out for Ellis in
the ninth.
DO YOU KNOW ... that the
idea of football was originated
in the 11th century by English
workmen, who kicked around
the skull of one of the Danish
invaders?

* O
SHOWING
Auspices of
East Ann Arbor
" Business sMen's
Association
FREE PARKING ON PLATT RD.

In the eighth with Wolverine
trying to protect their slim tw
s run lead, the first two Detroit
- ers up reached base. Shortstop
f Herb Boldt worked Settle for a
t free ticket to first, and Ed
Jeakle laced a single off Jack
McDonald's glove into righ
field. Antczak then sent Wolf
back into short center to nab
his looping fly, and both righ
fielder Brakie Orr and O'Connor
flied out.
f Settle walked three batsmen an
struck out two in racking up h
first victory and complete game o
the season. He relied mostly o
5his curve which he had workin
to near perfection.
* * *
ELLIS, ON THE other han
whiffed three Wolverines an
handed out four free trips to firs
The Wolverines ran wild on
the base paths, pilfering a total
of six sacks in all. McDonald
led in this department, with
three to his credit. In the eighth,
after swiping second, he raced to
third when the Titan catcher
lobbed the ball back to the
mound.
Baker was the only Wolverin
to collect more than one hit, an
he was involved in both of the rur
producing innings, driving in on
tally and scoring the other.
In general the Maize and Blu
diamondmen played one of thei
better games of the season an
gave every indication of continu
ing their winning streak whicl
now stands at three.
Goodall Round
RobinToday
NEW ROCHELLE, N.Y.-(P)-
Bobby Locke, the disgruntled
South African, gets a whack at 15
of this country's top professional
in the annual Goodall Round
Robin Golf Tournament starting
today at Wykagyl Country Club.
They include Herman Barron
Bryon Nelson, Sam Snead, Dutch
Harrison, Bob Hamilton, Jim Tur-
nesa, Skip Alexander, Jimmy De-
maret, Clayton Haefner, Chick
Harbert, Johnny Palmer, Lloyd
Mangrum, Cary Middlecoff, Vic
Ghezzi and Fred Haas Jr.
Pledges Clash
At Burns Park
Normally a softball game on
Thursday afternoon at Burns
Park isn't unusual, but it is when
fraternity and sorority pledges
take the field against each other.
It all started when the pledges
of Sigma Delta Tau felt their fem-
inine vanity being rifted by the
jeers of the pledges of their Kap-
pa Nu fraternity neighbors.
With the awarding or a piacque
being slated for the winner of
their afternoon's contest, the af-
fair is termed a perpetual contest
for future pledge classes to up-
hold.

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S^ A NewsfeOhure
AP SPORTS FLASHES u
(.S(
NEW YORK-The Cincinnati St. Louis Cardinals, 7-0, with a
Reds, behind the six-hit pitching three-hit performance last night
e of righthander Howard Fox, de- before a chilled 14,419 crowd. The
d feated the New York Giants 4-2 Tribesmen clinched matters with
n yesterday, to snap the National a fie-rn usin mterst
e League leaders' winning streak at Innive-run uprising in the first
seven straight. * * *
e The light-hitting Reds whacked BROOKLYN-Rookie southpaw
r three Giant flingers for 10 hits and Bill Werle survived a ninth inning p
d shelled starter Monte Kennedy off rally last night as the Pittsburgh A
- the mound in the sixth inning. Pirates whipped the Brooklyn s
Fox had a two-hit snutout go- Dodgers, 5-3, before 22,709 fans b
ing into the eighth inning, but at Ebbets Field. Werle gave up c:
a home run by Jack Lohrke ended seven hits, three of them in the 6
his hopes in that direction. A last inning whei Bob Ramazzotti
double by Johnny Mize followed by homered with one on base.
Will Marshall's single, accounted h * n
for the losers' other run in the
ninth. PHILADELPHIA - The Chi- s
* * * cago Cubs came from behind W
last night to defeat the Phila- i
CHICAGO-The. Chicago White delphia Phillies 4-2 and hand ti
5 Sox scored in every inning here Ken Heintzelman his first loss
5 yesterday to blast Boston 12-8, in five decisions this season.,
and climb back to a .500 per- * * *
centage rating in American League CLEVELAND - The Cleveland
standings. Indians snapped out of their slumpt
, last night by trimming the front
DETROIT-The Washington running New York Yankees, 3 to
Senators turned in the ninth 2. Left fielder Dale Mitchell a
straight win of their western crossed the plate with the winning
road trip as they pummeled the run in the seventh inning on a
Detroit Tigers for an 11 to 1 de- wild pitch by losing pitcher Bob
cision yesterday. Porterfield.
The Senators jumped all over Bob Lemon started on the
Detroit starting pitcher Stubby mound for Cleveland but it was
Overiire for five runs in the only a formality. He received a
first inning and continued their torn fiber in a muscle above the
14 hit attack against Overmire's left hip during the pre-game
three successors-Stuart, Kret- warmup and pitched to only one
low, and Rogovin. man because his name already
* * * was in the lineup.
ST. LOUIS-The St. Louis
Browns pushed two runs across the
plate in the seventh inning last KEEP A- H EAD
night to edge out the Philadelpha OF YOUR HAIR!
Athletics, 5-4. O O RH I
Alongside homers by Chapman e
and Joost, Jack Graham doubled Be well-groomed with a suave,
twice, batting in two runs and smart hair style, designed for
scoring twice himself to pace the you alone. Plenty of Tonsorial
Brownie attack. Artists-to please you at your
* * * convenience!
BOSTON-Lefty Warren Spahn The DASCOLA BARBERS
gained his fourth win of the sea- Liberty off State
son, plus his second shutout, for

icip _7

Fourth Strai ht'M' Win
David Edges Out Paton
Hetzeck, Naugle, MacKay, Otto, Mikulich
Snare Singles Victories Over Notre Dame

ILL S ESSION
s. brown, sports editor

By TONY BUESSER
The Wolverine net squad downed
he Irish of Notre Dame 7-2 yes-j
erday on the home courts as they
won their fourth straight match
of the season.
The number one singles saw
Andy Paton of Michigan very
much under par in his game as he
dropped two sets in a row to
Notre Dame's Bob David 6-1, 7-5,
putting the Irish ahead 1-0.
* * *
BUT THE REST of the singles
matches went pretty much like the
ther three Wolverine net vic-
CORRECTION
The Michigan-Northwestern
tennis match is scheduled; to be
played in Ann Arbor, Friday,
May 13. The match wlil start
at 2:00 in the afternoon on the
varsity courts. It was prev-
iously announced that the
match would be held in Evan-
ston.
ories with all the points ending
up on the Michigan side of the
core card.
In the number two singles it
was Al Hetzeck slamming his
way through two sets to defeat
Notre Dame's Gene Biittner 6-0,
6-2 and tie up the score for
Michigan. No third sets were
played in the singles matches.
Big Fred Otto was in the third
lace slot for the Wolverines fac-
ng Jim Rodgers of Notre Dame.
Lthough temporarily forced to
top thecontest due to a strained
)ack muscle, Otto came back to
linch the point, winning the sets
-0, 6-2.
* * *
BILL MIKULICH, absent from
ast week's match against Minne-
ota, was on hand to top Ralph
litucki of the Green 6-1, 6-3
n the number four singles posi-
on.
In the fifth spot for Michigan
was blonde Bob MacKay serv-
ing to Herb Hoene of the Irish.
MacKay drove his opponent
through two sets to slip over
him 6-3, 6-1.
To finish the singles matches
rnd leave the score at 4-1 Mich-

igan, Wolverine Gordie Naugle,
number six man, smashed home a
6-2, 6-1 decision over Notre Dame's
Jim Hennessy.
* * *
BUT IN THE NUMBER one
Doubles featuring Wolverines Paton
and Mikulich cross-net from David'
and Biittner of the Irish, Notre
Dame again camne out on the
winning end. This was the only
duel of the afternoon that went
three sets, the boys from South
Bend taking it 6-4, 1-6, 6-4.
Hetzeck and Otto teamed, up
to sink a Notre Dame combina-
tion of Witucki and Hennessy
6-2, 6-0 in the number two
doubles.
To finish off the victory for the
Maize and Blue, MacKay and
Naugle tripped up a Notre Dame
combo of Rodgers-O'Brien to take
the last point for Michigan 6-0,
6-1.
The Wolverines' next match will
be played against Northwestern
University at 1 p.m. tomorrow on
the home courts.
Kohl Selected
ByBaltimore
Ralph Kohl, a regular tackle on
the Wolverine football team for
the last two seasons, has been
signed by the Baltimore Colts to
play in the All-America football
conference.
High on the list of the Colts'
draft choices, the 230 pound Cleve-
lander was one of the stalwarts
of the undefeated Michigan squad
last year, playing mostly on the
offensive unit.
Kohl worked on the defensive
combination with the 1947 team,
which climaxed it's season with
the Rose Bowl victory.
Although still on the campus
as a special grad student, Kohl has
a phys-ed degree and hopes to
enter the coaching ranks after his
interlude in the professional grid-
iron circles.

BACK IN THE GOOD old days, when there was no doubt as to the
outcome of a pugilistic episode in which Joe Louis was the leading
figure, fight fans could figure on a few solid jabs and one smashing up.
percut for a Brown Bomber victory. And now, as then, it is taking the
retired heavyweight champ about as much effort to become king pit
in the fight promotion field. For, if rumors are correct, Louis' Interna-
tional Boxing Club will soon monopolize the staging of fistic affairs al
over the country.
The New York Journal-American said that it had learned yes-
terday that the Tournament of Champions, the first organization
to buck Mike Jacobs' Twentieth Century Sporting Club dynasty,
would be absorbed by the IBC in the near future. For two years,
the T. of C. was Jacobs' biggest headache. Then came the IBC and
the beginning of the end for Uncle Mike. Last Thursday, Jacobs
cashed in the chips, and Madison Square Garden officials an-
nounced that they were organizing a corporation to take over the
Garden fights.
It was revealed at that time that the new corporation would work
closely with the Louis-Norris-Wirtz combine. But now that the T. of C
is giving way to the IBC, another fistic dynasty is in the offing. Jacobs
competitors put on quite a few colorful shows in New Jersey in the
short tenure and, for a time, it seemed as though the Twentieth Cen-
tury was on the way out. Significantly, it was the fight fan who bene-
fitted, what with the throat-cutting matches put on by the rival clubs
But if the Gotham newspaper's story proves correct, the fans'
gravy days have come to a quick end. Once Louis and his cohorts
gain control of promotions, they need not worry about the offer-
ings to the public. No monopoly ever does. And even without the
T. of C. absorbed into the fold, the IBC controls just about all all
there is. The combine has sewn up Detroit's Olympia, the Chicago
Stadium, the Garden, the Polo Grounds and the Yankee Stadium.
Well, if nothing else, it will seem like old times once again-and
just like the heavyweight division for the past 13 years, Joe Louis will
be on top.
* * * *
THREE WEEKS OF THE new baseball season are now history... .
Baffling all experts, the New York teams are on top.... And the
boys in the know are wondering what has caused the 56 hit bats-
men.... Lou Boudreau and Clyde McCullough have been the hardest
hit (figuratively), with three disters having found the mark when
these unfortunates were at the platter.
* * * *
IN CASE YOU didn't know, Sports Extra is telling its readers
that a date worth watching is October 15, when, it says,
Minnesota plays Ohio State for probable Big Ten football title
and Rose Bowl occupancy. . . . Aren't they forgetting somebody
when they talk about the Conference title????
* * * *
WHEN BIGGIEOMUNN walked on to the Spartan field to gieet as-
pirants for the Michigan State grid team, there were 231 huskies
waiting. Could it be they're all eager to take a crack at the Wolverines?
The news that seeps down this way from East Lansing indicates that
the Spartans are a little bitter over Michigan's recent dealings with
State and will be out for revenge come the first game of next season.

iron circles. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ _ Sttnileotfrreegoete is aeofnx esn

I

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CAN THIS DISMAL SHARDBE
WE WERETHINKING OF PICKING (
t: AS QUEEN OF OUR JUNE BALL ?
CAN IHELP IT IF I FEEL LI KE
- rTHE AST ROE DOFSUMKER
-"-= FROMV STUDYING' AND SMOKING
SO MUCH ?
DOLORES THERE'S PLEASE DO, DOLLY! PHILIP<
NO CI0ARETTE HANGOVER aMORRIS IS THE O1V5 CIGAR-
WHEN YOU SWITCH TO ETTE PROVED DEFINITELY
PHILIP MORRIS! WHY LESS IRRITATING! /I
NOT GIVE THEM A TRIAL?
.~2
iFEEL TERRIBLE UT
LLTRY -'TH EM.-.- ;" #
THAT HANDSOME ALL-AMERICAN .;
FOOTBALL STAR CERTAINLY FINDS
NEPENTHE IN OUR DOLORES! ° -.-- .'
_ - -~ -
NO WONDER! PHILIP MORRISo
AND THAT SETTING, HAVE
METAMORPHOSED a
HERCOMLTL

I

GHTS VOLORES WITH VERIGINOUS
AS OF - -APSOOIC RECOGNITION!
SHE CERTAINLY ISA
GORGEOUS GORGON! 0 PLEAST RFE.
DOLORES, WHY NOT SNAP LIKE A IDESYIC
OUT OF IT AND 13IK1ADEI
FAIR TO YOURSELF? ? CAD MNUTMEG
L ( AND MY MOUTH'S
. . f ALL STALE AND
SMOKED-OUT
-.-
1 CAN SEE WHERE i
,r + 6 ARPJVED JUST IN TIME ..>
....# . DOLORES, THAT DIVINE GOWN
fj *MAKES YOU LIKE THE BREATH
OF SPRING ITSELF-, AND YOU
LOOK SO HAPPY.
* *
CONGRATULATE JOHNNY:
THANKS TO HIM IT'S NO
CIGARETTE HANGOVER
FOR.ME ANY MORE !
Use These Words with Tongue-in-Cheek!
(Plan to use ONE every week!)
DESICCATED (dess-ik-a-ted)-dried-up.
GORGON (go'r-gon)-a mythical she-monster
with snakes for hair.
METAMORPHOSED (met-ah-mo'r-fozed) -
transformed.
NEPENTHE (nee-pe's-the)-a potion to ban*
ish pain or misery.
NO CIGARETTE HANGOVER - no stale
smoked-out taste; no tight dry feeling In
your throat due to smoking.
RHAPSODIC (rap-sod-ik)-charged with emo-
tion, usually of delight.
SHARD (shard)-a bro~n piece or fragment.
VERTIGINOUS (vur-tij-in-us)-giddy, dizzy.

I

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