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May 10, 1949 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-05-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rUEvAY, MAY IU,4 4 THE MICHIGAN DAILY
CS i mgan 'M' Adds ti
Wildcat LinksenSbdc iTrend witl

PAGE THREE
o Diamond Upset
4 Wins Over Ill11

READY, AIM, FIRE:
Passing Targets Plentiful
Among Football Hopefuls

(This is the last in a series of ar-
tices concerning the outstanding
candidates for the various positions
in regard to spring football prac-
tice.)
By PRES HOLMES
To round out the discussion of
grid prospects, as the spring foot-
ball season heads into the last
week, one of the important de-
tails still to be considered is the
art of passing-both sending and
receiving.
This article deals only with the
line, which makes the senders,
centers, and the ends, naturally
enough, the receivers. The ball is
handlev of course, between the
tin the center passes it and the
end sees it, by other men on the
team, but the backfield was taken
care of in an earlier article.
FOUR MEN ARE BACK from
last year's championship squad to
fill the end positions: Harry Allis,
Irv Wisniewski, Ozzie Clark, and
Bob Hollway. Allis will probably
be moved over to right end on
offense to fill the gap left by the
loss of Dick Rifenburg.
Up from last year's "B" team
are two promising end prospects.
Gorge Sutherland looks good
in the flanker position, as does
John. Anderson.
The freshman squad has con-
tributed four ends to the Wol-
verine grid picture. Tom Kelsey,
who palyed for Ohio State in
1945 is regarded as one of the out-
standing prospects for the right
side of the line.

BOB DINGMAN, a strong and
rugged Saginaw product, is work-
ing in the left end position. Les
Pepp, who worked on the hard-
woods last winter for Ernie Mc-
Coy, is displaying his ball han-
dling ability in spring drills and
looks very good in the role of
pass receiver.
Jim Skala, who played bas-
ketball for the freshmen team
this year, never played football
before, but is doing very well.
The center position is four deep
in returning varsity men. Bob Er-
ben, Dick Farrar, and Carl Krea-
ger all saw action last year, and
Tony Momson worked with the
1945 Wolverine team.
MOMSON APPEARS to be the
best prospect for the defensive
center slot vacated by Dan Dwor-
sky.
Ed Kuzanek, a 230-pounder
from Chicago and Rus Kavanaugh
are freshmen who have been out-
standing in the pivot position.
Kavanaugh has a lot to learn and
will be used on defense mostly,
but he is coming up rapidly and
can be expected to be an asset to
the Wolverines in the future.
DO YOU KNOW . . . that
against Michigan, in 1924, Har-
old (Red) Grange, the Gallop-
ing Ghost of Illinois, carried the
ball exactly five times - and
scored five touchdowns.

ThisWeek
BASEBALL
May 11--University of Detroit
at Ann Arbor, 3:30 p.m.
May 13-Ohio State University
at Columbus, O.
May 14-Ohio State University
at Columbus, O.
TENNIS
May 11--University of Notre
Dame at Ann Arbor, 2
p.m.
May 13-Northwestern U. at
Evanston, Ill.
May 14--University of Illinois
at Champaign, Ill.
TRACK
May 14-University of Illinois
at Ann Arbor, 2 p.m.
GOLF
May 14-Ohio State University
at Ann Arbor.
Yesterday 's
Scores
By The Associated Press
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Detroit 4, New York 1.
(Only game scheduled.)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
St. Louis 14, Brooklyn 5.
New York 7, Chicago 2.
Boston 4, Pittsburgh 1.
Cincinnati-Philadelphia, rain.
TODAY'S GAMES
AMERICAN LEAGUE
New York at Detroit.1
Boston at St. Louis.
Philadelphia at Chicago (night)
Washington at Cleveland.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Chicago at New York.
St. Louis at Brooklyn.
Cincinnati at Philadelphia.
(Only games scheduled).

(Special to The Dally)
EVANSTON, Ill. - It was the
same old story yesterday for Mich-
igan's barnstorming golfers as
they absorbed their third Confer-
ence defeat in a row, this time at
the hands of Northwestern's Wild-
cats at the Wilmette Country Club
near here.
The score was 15%-112.
IF IT IS ANY consoluation to
the victory-starved Wolverines, it
can be said that the weather con-
ditions yesterday were completely
adverse to good golf. Lusty winds
off Lake Michigan brought with
them numbing temperatures in the
low forties.
The win over Michigan gave
UN an even split in four Big
Nine contests so far this season.
The Wolverines added a new
twist in losing this one. They reg-
istered an average medal score of
75.8 as opposed to the 77.3 hung up
by the winners, but obviously they
were unable to come throughon
enough point scoring opportuni-
ties.
* * *
IN THE MORNING round of
best ball matches, Captain Ed
Schalon of Michigan started his
team off in the right direction by
notching birdies on the last three
holes, thus enabling him and
Chuck MacCullum to down Wild-
cat aces Bill Sticklen and Chuck
Steingraber, 2-1.
Scalon's teammates didn't
seem to get the idea, however, as
they proceeded to drop five or
the six remaining best ball
poinis. Bob Sederburg and Bob

Wolverines Undergo Third
Big Nine Loss,_15 /2-11 [/
C -

Reinland disposed of Wolverines
Rog Kessler and Pete Elliott de-
spite the fact that the latter was
low man in the foursome with a
73, two over par.
Then Leo Hauser and Bob Olson
bowed to the number three North-
western twosome to make the
morning rout complete.
THE TUNE didn't change in the
afternoon individual matches ex-
cept for the fact that this time
Schalon also took it on the chin
in dropping all three points to
Sticklen. Kessler put Michigan
back in the contest by taking 2%2
from Reinland.
Chuck Lindgren cancelled
Kessler's efforts by blanking
W5auser in the number three
match, and Steingraber nailed
up the Wolverine coffin by drub-
bing Olson, 3-0.
As an anti-climax, Elliott and
MacCallum swept the remaining
six singles points from the 'Cats.
MacCallum went out in 35 and
crushed Stan Dittmar by winning
the first ten holes, ending his
round in an even part otal of 71,
the day's lone such accomplish-
ment.
MEDALIST FOR THE day was
Elliott with a 36 hole aggregate of
149. He continues to be the only
improving member of the Michi-
gan squad, playing steady golf in
every meet.
The greens here were hard
and rough, and the course in
general was neglected. These
factors added to the inclement
weather caused much of the
misery experienced by Michi-
gan's linksmen.
Despite the unsure carpeting,
Kessler turned in an amazing put-
ting performance on his afternoon
round. He required only 24 putts,
13 on the front nine and 11 on
the way in, but he was unable to
coordinate the rest of his game
and shot a 75.

Purdue Mile
'Relay Helps
'ill' o J ti
By HUGH QUINN
Purdue's mile relay team has a
knack for, settling other teams'
track meets.
The Boilermaker quartet did it
during the indoor season at a tri-
angular meet with Michigan and
Illincis, and did it again last Sat-
urday at the trigangular with the
Wolverines and Indiana.
AT BOTH MEETS the final
outcome depended on the mile
relay . .. Purdue was too far be-
hind in points to win either meet,
but their relay team won at Cham-
paign, Michigan was second, and
the Illini third . . . yet the final
results of the meet were reversed,
with Illinois winning . . . at Bloom-
ington, Michigan won the relay,
but Purdue beat out Indiana for
second place, and thus helped the
Wolverines gain a three-point edge
over the Hoosiers . . . Indiana
would have won the meet if Pur-
due had finished last in the relay.
Wolverine quarter-miler Jim
Ackerman was Saturday's most
disappointedhrunner . . . a fast
sprint in therstretch brought
him into third place behind
teammates Bob Sergeson and
Rod Warren, but a false white
line on the track fooled him .
Result: Ackerman stopped be-
fore the finish line.
Indiana tried to resurface their
track just two weeks ago . . . the
new "cinders" didn't take, and
the oval is now a ring of loose
gravel . . . Art Henrie, in starting
the 220-yard dash on the curve,
stumbled on a loose spot and
turned his ankle . . . X-rays yes-
terday showed there was no frac-
ture . . . final report on Henrie's
ankle is due Thursday.
FRED STOLIKER, in his fourth
season on the Michigan track
squad, earned his first point of
the season Saturday . . . Stoliker
pulled up fast at the finish of
the mile and placed fourth.

F

L DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
ferredbut candidates for Bache-
lor's degrees with superior ability
will be considered. A two-year
training period leads to possible
permanent appointment. Present
openings are in the Insurance Di-
vision for those who have com-
pleted courses in the mathematics
of life insurance.
For further information, con-
tact the Bureau of Appointments,
3528 Administration Building.
Let
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Employment Interviews:
Tuesday, May 10-A represen-
tative from the Terryberry Co.
will be here 4-6 p.m. to interview
men for salaried sales work in
school and fraternity jewelry in
Michigan and Ohio.
A representative from the Em-
ployer's Mutual Insurance Co. will
be here to interview men for sal-
aried sales positions. In addition,
they have an opening for someone
with writing ability for sales pro-
motion work in their office at
Wausaw, Wisconsin.
Thursday, May 12-A represen-
tative from the Upjohn Co. of
Kalamazoo, Mich., will be here to
interview men for positions in
pharmaceutical sales work. Ap-
plicants should have a background
in medicine, pharmacy, zoology,
physical education, or one of the
other biological sciences.
Friday, May 13-A representa-
tive from the Dayton plant of the
Harris-Seybold Co. will be here to
interview industrial-mechanical
engineers, and business adminis-
tration students for their man-
agement training program. Any
men who were interviewed by the
Cleveland plant interviewer may

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also talk to the Dayton represen-
tatives.
For further information and ap-
pointments, call Ext. 371, or call
at Bureau of Appointments, 3528
Admin. Bldg.
The Michigan State Civil Serv-
ice Commission announces vacan-
cies in mental hospitals ranging
from student phychiatric social
workers to psychiatric social work-
er administrator.
The Pan American Union has
an opening in the field of social
sciences to be handled as an in-
ternship for a Latin American stu-
dent who is specializing in the so-
cial sciences.
The Department of Commerce
Civil Aeronautics Administration
has a number of Aircraft Com-
municator vacancies in Alaska for
qualified single men.
The Alaska Fisheries Experi-
mental Commission invites appli-
cations for permanent research
positions in Alaska.
A large university is in need of
teachers of Business Administra-
tion with majors in the following
fields: Accounting: one with CPA
and PhD or near, and another
with CPA; Business Statistics and
Research PhD; Retailing near a
PhD; Freshman Business Orienta-
tion, near a PhD. The salaries
paid by this institution are excel-
lent.
The Maryland Department of
State Employment and Registra-
tion announces an examination
for the position of Classification
Analyst I. Candidates must be
graduates of an approved college
of university and must have had
one year of professional or tech-
nical experience.
Further information may be ob-
tained at the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 3528 Administration Build-
ing.
Lectures
University Lecture: Dr. Charles
W. Tomlinson, outstanding au-
thority on the geology of the Ar-
buckle Mountains, and president
of the American Association of Pe-
troleum Geologists for the current
year will speak on "Pennsylvania
Paleogeography in Southern Ok-
current rate on
insured savings
Extra earnings on Bonus
Savings Accounts

lahoma," 3 p.m. Wed., May 11,
2054 Natural Science Bldg.
Education Lecture Series: "Im-
proving the Quality of Civic Edu-
cation in Schools." Stanley E. Di-
mond, Director, Citizenship Edu-
cation Study, Detroit Public
Schools. 7 p.m., Wed., May 11, Uni-
versity High School Auditorium.
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for
Chungnim Choi Han, Oriental
Civilizations; thesis: "Social Or-
ganization of Upper Han Hamlet
in Korea," Wed., May 11, 210 An-
gell Hall, 3 p.m. Chairman, Mischa
Titiev.
Doctoral Examination for Ever-
ett Warner Bovard, Psychology;
thesis: "The Development of Out-
come Measures for Teaching Pro-
cedures Leading to Group Discus-
sions," Wed., May 11, East Coun-
(Continued on Page 4)

1111

1L.

--=--.

ENGLISH HUMBER AND SCHWINN
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BICYCLE AND SPORT STORE
113 West Washington

HEADQUARTERS FOR
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personnel, browse with our cli-
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services and workmanship at
your convenience. Queries in-
vited!
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty near State

WE ARE LOOKING FOR A GI OR GRADUATE OF
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STAFF of salesmen, to contact major appliance and
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Must have car and be able to travel. Experience help-
ful but .not necessary. Salary and expenses.
WRITE FOR APPOINTMENT
State Distributing Co., 30 N. lonia,
Grand Rapids, Michigan

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