100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 05, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-05-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE M CH lIGN DA1 PA

Wayne

Hot,

Michigan

Not;

Score,

9-4i

Extensive Duties, Lighter
SideVary Crisler's Job

/er

Losers Held to Five Hits;
Koceski H omers in Ninth
Holdsworth Bats in Four Runs for Tartar's
First Victory over Michigan in Two Years

Is,WAII!
W-EL ."

Tigers Beat Boston, 5-1;
Indians Squeeze by 'A's'

By JIM PARKER
Although no longer making
headlines as head football coach,
Herbert 0. "Fritz" Crisler con-
tinues to dominate the Michigan
athletic scene from backstage as
athletic director.
In this little-publicized position
which he has held since 1941,
Crisler has jurisdiction over Uni-
versity athletic programs-campus

By BEV BUSSEY
(Sorts Feature Editor)
ROYAL OAK-Wayne waited
two long years for this baseball
game, and the merry-go-round the
base paths was more satisfying to
the Tartars. ,
They had lost by double figure
scores in the past, so when they
jimped into a quick lead in the
first inning yesterday at Memorial
Park, the dye was cast for the final
total, 9-4.
* * *
THE RUNS weren't the results
of big innings. Rather, Wayne bat-
ters nibbled away at the offerings
of three Michigan pitchers to score
in five frames and placed men on
the bases in the other two.
In the meantime, Michigan
batters found it difficult to place
the offerings of right-hander
Fred Holdsworth into the wide
open spaces.
They connected for five hits, two
more than the Wayne pitcher got.
And to settle the matter of four
"M" runs, Holdsworth's slashes
drove in four tallies for his own
personal account.
AFTER A PAIR of singles by Bill
Bucholz and Ted Kobrin in the
opening frame, the Wolverines
couldn't hustle a safety until the
seventh. They had pushed across
one run in the second on an error,
two more in the seventh.
But it wasn't until the ninth
that a Michigan batter leaned
into one of Holdsworth's fast
balls and sent it deep along the
left field foul line. Leo Koceski
was romping home before the
ball even reached the infield.
That was Koceski's second hit
and second run in as many times
at bat. Bucholz garnered a couple
singles and Kobrin got one to
round out Michigan's batting
power.
Probable Pitchers
AMERICAN LEAGUE 1
New York at Chicago-Rey-
olds (1-1) vs. Pierce (2-0).
Boston at Cleveland-Kramer
(0-1) vs. Feller (0-1).
Philadelphia at Detroit -
Brissie (3-0) or Scheib (1-0) vs.
Gray (0-0).
Washington at St. Louis-
(night)-Haefner (0-1) vs. Em-.
bree (0-3).
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Cincinnati at Brooklyn-Weh-I
meier (1-0) vs. Banta (0-1). ,
Pittsburgh at New York-
Sewell (2-0) vs. Jones (2-3).
St. Louis at Philadelphia
Munger (0-0) vs. Borowy (1-1).
THE
requires your best appearance
in a handsome individualistic
hair style - Blended to your
facial features. Tonsorial quer-
ies invited!!!
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty off State

DAVE SETTLE started on the
Michigan mound. He yielded five
hits and four runs before giving
way to Pat Morrison in the fifth
inning, and Ed Grenkowski who
went the rest of the way from the
sixth.
It was Grenkowski's first ap-
pearance, and in three innings,
he struck out four men and was
nicked for two hits and two runs,
one coming in on an error.
Both teams took advantage of
miscues. Michigan scored its first
run when Lefty Morrill was safe
at first on a high throw, reached
second as Wolff walked, and came
home while Pete Palmer was
grounding into a double play.
Again in the seventh, an error
meant a run. Koceski singled
Raymond was safe on an error.
Leo scored when the Wayne
catcher threw wild past first base.
Baker walked and Raymond
scooted home on Bucholz' single.
I Box Score I

By The Associated Press
DETROIT-Righthander Virgil
Trucks of the Detroit Tigers held
the hard-hitting Boston Red Sox
to three hits as he beat them 5-1
yesterday for his fourth straight
triumph of the season.
Trucks faced only 32 batters
overthe nine inning route and
only Ted Williams, Bosox left-
fielder gave him much trouble.
Williams slammed his fourth
homer of the season in the sev-
enth inning and hit a single in
the ninth.
Bill Goodman had the only
other Boston hit, a double in
the fifth inning but was cut
down trying to stretch it into a
triple.
The Tigers, who had 17 hits in
Tuesday's 14-14 13-inning mar-
athon with the Red Sox, pounded
out 15 more hits yesterday-all
of them singles.
* * *
CLEVELAND - Two home
runs by Joe Gordon, one of them
coupled with two other circuit
blows in the third inning, en-
abled the world champion
Cleveland Indians to score a
to 3 victory over the Philadel-
phia Athletics yesterday.
The Cleveland barrage gave
Gene Bearden his third straight
win of the season. Dick Fowler,
who was the loser, was replaced in
the fourth by southpaw Alex Kell-
ner, who allowed the Tribe only
two hits the rest of the way.
CHICAGO - The Washington
Senators slugged out three round
trippers, two in the ninth inning,
to snare an 8-7 decision from the
Chicago White Sox and sweep a
two-game series yesterday.
Ernie Groth, successor to
starter Marino Pieretti, pitched
a home run ball to Ed Stewart
leading off the ninth. This swat
still left the Senators trailing,
7-6, but Mark Christman had
the remedy for that.
* * *
ST. LOUIS-Phil Rizzuto and
Gerry Coleman led a 15-hit Yan-
kee attack yesterday as New York
swept a two-game series from the
St. Louis Browns, 10-5, for Vic
Raschi's fourth straight victory.
Raschi settled down after a bad
first inning when the lowly
Browns banged out four hits, good

for three runs. After that he
never gave more than one hit an
inning.
Rizzuto drove in four runs
with a homer, his second in two
days, and two singles. Coleman
contributed a triple and two
singles and Hank Bauer added
a triple and single. Everybody
in the Yank lineup hit safely
except Yogi Berra.
Jack Graham, the Browns' first
base rookie, hit his fifth homer
with Gerry Priddy on base in the
first inning and Eddie Pellagrini
homered in the seventh with no-
body on base.
* * *
NEW YORK-The New York
Giants celebrated manager Leo
Durocher's return to action yes-
terday with a three-homer salvo
and a 11-4 triumph over the Pitts-
burgh Pirates. Sid Gordon clouted
his sixth four-bagger of the year,
Johnny Mize got his second and
Bobby Thomson his third, to en-
able Larry Jansen to coast to his
first pitching win of the year.
* * *
BROOWLYN-Roy Campan-
ella, Brooklyn's husky catcher,
banged out two hits yesterday to
run his consecutive hitting
streak through ten games while
leading the Dodgers to a 5-1 vic-
tory over the Cincinnati Reds.'
The 27-year old New Yorker,
who leads the National League in
batting, upped his mark to .469
with a single and double. He fig-
ured in Brooklyn's two spurts with
a stolen base, run batted in, and
two runs scored in addition to his
two safeties.
* * *
PHILADELPHIA - The Phila-
delphia Phillies ran their winning
streak to five straight and Ken
Heitzelman chalked up his fourth
successive pitching triumph with
a 7-5 decision over the St. Louis
Cardinals last night.
BOSTON - Boston's Braves
alertly scored all their runs in
the opening inning last night and
then fended off two Chicago ral-
lies in beating the Cubs 4-3 be-
fore a home audience of 19,238
fans. The first 18 Chicago batters
were retired before the Cubs could
score in the seventh inning against
Boston's ace right hander, Johnny
Sain. -

FRITZ CRISLER
... Still Top Man
* * *

sity golf course, to protests
from die-hards that Michigan's
football teams are "pouring it
on too thick."
Often letters are addressed to
"Mr. Crysler" or as one from out
west opened: "Fritz Kreisler: A
man of your intelligence and un-
questioned musical ability ..,.
THEN TIIERE is always the
headache presented by the yearly
overflow of requests for football
seats "midway up on the 50 yard
line." Others are content to ex-
press their dissatisfaction with
airplanes flying over the stadium.
While still coaching football,
Crisler was often the recipient
of "advice" from people all over
the country. "Astounding" foot-
ball plays were often submitted
by arm-chair strategists--"Just
the thing to use against Ohio
State."
One doctor related the "shock"
lie received when he witnessed a
game and noticed the Michigan
players drinking from the same
water bucket.
* * *
WHEN THE Wolverines were
preparing for the Rose Bowl game
in 1947, another doctor, quite con-
cerned with the health of the
Michigan team, wrote: "Celery will
keep the boys cool if it is hot on
January first."
"Never a dull moment," says
Crisler.
In anybody's book, one of them
is Joseph H. Axelrod. Said TIME
last year:
Joseph H. Axelrod, 3, was one of
the first New Englanders to have a
telephone in his automobile. He needed
it. As boss of six textile mills in four
cities in Massachusetts and Rhode
Island, plump, hustling Joe Axelrod
made the rounds every day, and he
liked to keep in touch. Last week, Joe

as well as the vast
sports enterprises.

intercollegiateI

*

DON'T FENCE ME IN!
' Fencers To Participate
In State Open Championships

WAYNE AB
Rzepka, 2b ....4
Hazely, ss ......5
Rabinowitz, lf...5
Sruk, lb .......4
D'ambrazio, rf. .5
Bolla, 3b ......4
Tarczy, c ......4
Bell, cf ........4
Holdsworth, p ..4

R
1
2
1
0
0
1
2
1
1

H
0
1
1
3
0
0
2
1
3

PO
2
1
3
11
0
0
7
3
0

A
5
4
0
0
0
1
1
0
6

E
1
0
0
0
0
1
0;
1'
0

-

-

TOTALS ...39 9 11 27 17 3
MICHIGAN
Bakerlf......5 0 0 1 1 1
Bucholz, 2b ....4 0 2 1 2 0
Kobrin,3b.....4 0 1 1 2 1
McDonald, lb ..4 0 '0 8 0 1
Morrill, rf.....3 1 0 0 0 0
*Fryling, rf ....1 0 0 0 0 0
Wolffss......4 0 0 1 0 0
Hartzmark, cf ..1 0 0 1 0 0
**Koceski f ..2 2 2 1 0 0
Palmerc......2 0 04 1 0
Raymond, c ....2 1 0 5 0 0
Settle, p .......1 0 0 0 4 0
***Morrison p..0 0 0 0 1 0
:Grenkowski, p 2 0 0 1 2 0
::Dorr ........1 0 0 0 0 0
TOTALS ...36 4 5 24 13 3
*Replaced Morrill in 8th
**Replaced Hartzmark in 7th
***Pitched the 5th
:Replaced Morrison in 6th
::Batted for Settle in 5th
Michigan ...0 10 000 201
Wayne .....201 1 3 0 120x

;I

Michigan's Scimitar Club will!
be well represented in the Michi-
gan Open championships, the
state's biggest fencing event,
which will be held Saturday, May
14th at the Book Cadillac hotel
in Detroit.
Representing the swordsmen in
the championships, which are in
all divisions for men and in foil
for women, will be Pete Young
and Ed Micllef, Mfchigan's "one-
two" punch in foil.
MICLLEF HOLDS a variety of
state foil titles but has recently
been hard pressed by teammate
Young in state foil competition.
Young finished second to
Micllef in the Michigan inter-
collegiates, and last week led
qualifiers for the state open
finals, beating the Scimitar
Club captain in the semi-final
bouts.
Micllef hopes to rectify this sit-
uation in the May 14th event, by
taking the state open foil title.
This shapes up a tough task as the
competition will be stern.
* * *
BESIDES YOUNG, the entry

list includes Byron Krieger, de-
fending champion, and midwest-
ern foil titlist, and Dick Yasen-
chek, top-notch Lawrence Tech
swordsman.
Held in the Crystal Room of
the hotel, the bouts will be di -
The golf course will be closed
to the public Saturday, May 7,
because of the I-M tournament.
Only those competing in the
tournament will be allowed on
the course.
-Bert Katzenmeyer.
ected by Bela de Tuscan, coach
of Wayne University and world-
famed fencing master, who
founded and now directs Detroit's
Salle de Tuscan in addition to
his duties at Wayne.

AS DIRECTOR of Intercolle-
giate Athletics re presides over
the coaching staff, has charge of
the athletic plant, regulates train-
ing periods and makes out season
schedules. He also is responsible
for the operation of the University
physical education program and
for the maintenance of campus
recreational facilities.
In addition, he is chairman of
the Board in Control of Inter-
collegiate Athletics.
In order to concentrate on his
extensive duties as athletic direc-
tor, Crisler asked to be relieved
from coaching last year, leaving
behind an enviable record of 71
wins, 16 losses, and three ties in
his ten-year reign as head coach.
** *
CORRESPONDENCE occupies
an interesting phase of the Ath-
letic Director's present duties nad
in many cases provides the lighter
side of his job.
Crisler's office is constantly
deluged with a swarm of letters
ranging from complaints that
students are not wearing "suf-
ficient clothing" on the Univer-

--.fcet ltig n h nvr

Major League Standings

CAM PUS CRISES
E /~*
2

by1Bs9

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W. L. Pet.
New York ....12 3 .800
Cleveland..... .7 4 .636
Detroit ........8 5 .615
Chicago.......8 7 .533
Philadelphia .. 8 8 .500
Boston........6 7 .462
Washington .. 5 11 .313
St. Louis ..... 3 12 .200
GAMES TODAY
New York at Chicago
Boston at Cleveland
Philadelphia at Detroit
WnCm~ tt~ta Q .vi

NATIONAL LEAGUE

G.B.
3
3
4
41/
5
71/
9

W.
Boston .......10
New York . ... 8
Brooklyn......8
Cincinnati ...'7
Philadelphia .. 8
St. Louis......6
Chicago.......6
Pittsburgh .... 6

L.
6
7
7
7
8
7
8
9

Pet.
.625
.533
.533
.500
.500
.462
.429
.400

G.B.
1%
1 2
2
2
211
3
31/

GAMES TODAY
Cincinnati at Brooklyn
Pittsburgh at New York

qI wVsi ngAion av. 76. Lou. isUI fit. iiuis at Philaelphia
4 ,"4.4. .r.,.:: .:: :.;v: t..,.,, ., ..\ ...a::..saco:ti;<4"}?}.:. .: ::::":: :.:":.: ::: :::::w ",::,"}:"

greater ?/ate.than
AT N
5 5
TWO-PIECE
? " "SUIT '

(.ver

:' ..
< :.;a
::::Ct :{Q
'"4 .
{"
1: :"
/::

:
f'
f
r
r
/i
l

(2)
I-i'
/6/
/6 ,
~/,
),

J. R. KELLY, Woonsocket, Rhode Island
JOE AXELROD
A car telephone is needed.
Axelrod added a- fifth city (Provi-
dence) to his tour, a seventh plant
(the Damar Wool Combing Co.) to
his holdings. Even for a young man
who likes to keep moving, Axelrod had
moved far. In 9/ years he had par-
layed $5,500 into an integrated textile
empire worth $16 million.
Joe started to work in 1938, when
he was just out of the University of
Pennsylvania. To his $5oo savings, his
father, James, a textile jobber, added
$5,000. With the money, they formed
Airedale Worsted Mills, Inc. with Joe
as president. They rented a loft in a
Woonsocket (R.I.) mill, bought some
secondhand machinery, hired two
workers and started weaving worsted
fabrics.
The Team. Joe made the goods; his
father sold them. Selling was no trick
when war came; the trick was produc-
tion. Joe turned it by picking up the
newest textile machines, applying the
newest techniques, and plowing all
profits back into more plants. Joe's
aim was integration-enough plants to.
handle wool virtually from the sheep's
back to finished cloth. In 1942 Aire-
dale Worsted Mills, Inc. was healthy
enough to take over Woonsocket's
Bernon. In the next three years the
Axelrods wove the Jeffrey Finishing
Co., Woonsocket's Lippitt Worsted
Mills and Dorlexa Dyeing & Finish-
ing Co. and Pawtucket's Crown
Manufacturing Co. into their em-
pire. Last spring they got control of
New Bedford's old, famed Wamsutta
Mills (sheetings, broadcloths, spe-
cialty fabrics). Joe and his dad, who
is treasurer, now have 3,150 men &
women (including Wamsutta) work-
ing for them, and with last week's
buy, they reached Joe's goal of in-
tegration.
Successful Business-.
'r. man Axelrod irads

Matchless

Assortment for Men and
Some Reduced from

Women . .

$8150r
To make this the greatest sale of its kind,
we have added to this $55 Price Group ;
Year-Round Twist Worstedsr
*Globe Finest Worsted Flannels
Princeton "Coiorama" Worsteds
* New Gabardines'
Also Tropical Worsteds and Koat-a-Kool for Summer Wear
...all at only $55.00!t

When your roommate smashes up the car you
expected fo use on a date that night..boy, you're
gefting the full TREATMENT. So simply..
Wolverines know they can't get the breaks
all the time. But when the going gets
tough, there's nothing like mild 'n' mellow
Old Golds to ease the strain. Old Golds are
so rich and smooth-so down-right enjoy-
able-they make even good days that much
better. For smoking pleasure at its positive
peak, try an Old Gold yourself ... today! #
T1r M at - -

Give yourself a TREAT! Cheer up-
light up...an OLD GOLD...for a
TREAT instead of taREATMENT!

'k
/ Nr

a

I

II

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan