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April 17, 1949 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-04-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIIE NICIIITAN IILY

PINK ONES, YALLER ONES:

Poster Propaganda Floods Campus

By JOHN DAVIES
Campaign posters are spattering
the campus community in accel-
erating proportions as next week's
student government elections draw
near.
They are battling each other for
space on dorm and fraternity bul-
letin boards, in store windows, in
classroom buildings and until re-
cently prohibited, on trees and tel-
ephone poles.
Every color that ever graced An-
gell Hall walls are represented,
and the campaign posters vary
from postage stamp size to the
area a mainsail on a square rigger
would take.
The posters vary in dignity from
a decorous "Experience Counts"
to a less formal cry of "The Fer-
tilizer Must Go!"
The banners varied in amount
of writing from little more than
a scant mention of the candidates
name to the presentation of an in-
volved platform. Many posters fea-
tured photos of beaming faces; few
hopefuls could resist puns on their
names.
Most women candidates made an
appeal for votes on their physical
charm. Very few of their posters
lacked glamorous photos, although
one bold coed's banner read
"Looks, No. Brains, Yes." One less-
ened her dignity by terming her-
self "The Barefoot Guitar Player."
One candidate utilized old ad-
vertising posters of various natures
by pasting his name over certain
parts of them. Thus, for example,
a converted poster for the film
"Day of Wrath" had the candi-
dates name over the picture's
name, but left the laudatory quotes
about the film standing.
One said "A terrifying insight
into witchcraft, religion and adul-
tery."
A male candidate distributed lit-
tle cards, indirectly, into wash-
rooms in women's dorms. They
said "Joe Doakes Says Hello."
But campaigning is by no means
limited to posters. Those running
are feverishly running from open1
house to open house to thrust a
glad hand into a potential voter's.
Many are eating meals at frater-
nities, particularly independent
candidates, while many affiliated
hopefuls are guests at dorm meals.
Mass distribution of quad and
fraternity slates, as well as grand
scale vote swapping, are notori-
ously absent this year, the result
of a campaign to foster more in-
telligent campus voting on the
parts of the campus leaders.

Daily-Barth
RED, WHITE AND EVERY OTHER COLOR. Campaign posters for Tuesday and Wednesday's elec-
tions come in any color an artist's palette can create, and range in size from a king sized postage
stamp to a moderate-sized mural. They are bespattering scores of house bulletin boards, store
windows and classroom building walls throughoi t the campus community.

Blfood Test
For Cancer
Per fec ted
Describe Method
As Easy,_Cheap
DETROIT-(.4)-A simple new
blood test tells whether you have
any kind of cancer, and finds it
early, a leading cancer expert re-
ported yesterday.
The test is expected to be a big
new weapon in cancer control.
Lives are saved when hidden can-
cers are found and treated early.
IT WAS ANNOUNCED by Dr.
Charles B. Huggins, a surgeon and
president of the American Asso-
ciation for Cancer Research, meet-
ing here.
Ile said it is cheap and "rea-
sonably sure," but not perfect.
The findings on which it is
based may be even more impor-
tant than the test itself, he add-
ed, for they offer new clues to
the disease.
Dr. Huggins, Dr. Elwood Jensen
and Gerald Miller developed the
method at the University of Chi-
cago, building on the work of
many years by many men seeking
tests for the killer disease.
THE TEST CAN TELL if you
have a small' cancer, anywhere in
the body. But it doesn't tell where
the cancer is. Doctors would have
to search for it.
The test gives the same re-
sult if you have cancer or lung
tuberculosis, pneumonia, menin-
gitis or certain other serious in-
fections. These would have to be
ruled out before cancer was sus-
pected. But you would have to
be really sick with those dis-
eases to get the same blood sig-
nal that cancer gives, Dr. Hug-
gins explained.
Players To ir
FairyTales
The radio division of the speech
department will present the first
in a new series of programs at
6:45 p.m. today over Station
WPAG.
Entitled "Tales from the Four
Winds" the programs will feature
dramas written especially for chil-
dren. Today's story will be "The
Story of Fairyfoot," a tale about
rhe people of Stumpingham,
whose feet were as big as fishing
boats.
Shirley Loeblich will direct and
bhe cast includes Marilyn Weihe,
Nafe Katter, Elaine Lew, Jim
Reiss, Bob Tamplin, Phyllis
Pletcher, Ann Husselman and Ed
Pfluke. Original music will be
furnished by Harry Burr.
The series have been a regular
feature on the University Station;
WUOM.

Little did the lowly rabbit ever
realize that his swift-footed race
would be incorporated into a time-
honored Easter legend.
But since ancient times, when
the furry creature was revered by
pagan worshipers as an emblem of
fertility, or newlife, he and his
eggs have been as celebrated an
Easter myth as old St. Nick at
Christmas.
THE SIGNIFICANCE of hare's
eggs is originally associated with
an early Roman decree, forbidding

Lenten period. On
day, however, they
served as part of
feasts.

Ancient Egyptians, Persians,
Greeks and Romans dyed rabbit
eggs red to suggest Joyousness.
Another theory states the cim-
son color was symbolic of the
blood shed on Calvary.
And in medieval England priests
blessed eggs as part of a benedic-
tion authorized by Pope Paul V "in
thankfulness on account of the

EASTER BUNNY LEGEND:
Rabbit Eggs Hatch Colorful Tradition

Easter Sun-
were to be
the holiday

citizens to eat them during the resurrection of our Lord."

4

SWAYING LOLLIPOP:
Transmitter To Mount

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THE TIE-IN of Easter and the
rabbit springs from an early be-
lief that hares had a connection
with the moon. Egyptians adopted
the now traditional Easter bunny
since it's a nocturnal animal and
carried its young for one month,
thereby representing the lunar
cycle.
Since hares proved to be quite
scarce in America, the myth in
this country had to be based on
the hare's nearest relation, the
rabbit.

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Penthouse Perch Again

The large metal lollipop which
swayed so gaily from the top of
the Administration Building last
week is scheduled for an early re-
turn to its salmon-colored prom-
ontory.
Radio engineers from WUOM,
who insist that the weird contrap-
tion is not a confection after all,
but rather a high frequency trans-
mitter, explain that its disappear-
ance was due to the fact that it
swayed just a little too gaily.
* * *
THEY EXPECT that it will re-
appear sometime in the next week
or so, buttressed by new guy cables.
The transmitter is part of a

new microwave link with the
WUOM broadcasting transmit-
ter atop Peach Mountain, 17
miles northeast of Ann Arbor,
At present, the FM station's
broadcasts are relayed out to the
broadcasting transmitter by a
leased telephone cable. Broadcasts
are then beamed from the moun-
tain top in order to extend the
station's range.
* * *
THE LOLLIPOP - LIKE trans-
mitter is similar to those used as
relay stations by television com-
panies. It increases the frequency
of the sound waves, thereby short-
ening the wave length.

Stage-Struck
Dog Needed
For Operetta
Do you own a stage-struck dog?
Do any of your friends own a
dog who enjoys the lure of the
footlights? A small tan dog would
be preferred.
* * *
IF SUCH A DOG exists in Ann
Arbor, the Gilbert and Sullivan
Society can probably offer him a
job in their forthcoming produc-
tion of the operetta "Patience."
"Patience" satirizes the ac-
tions of long-haired aesthetic
poets, the kind who trot around
with a long stemmed lily or
daisy in hand. Naturally, the
show features just such a poet
-one Reginald Bunthorne by
name.
Don Dekker, dramatic director
of the show, feels that the appear:
ance of a small tan dog during a
certain scene of the second act
would contribute much to the
"aesthetic" setting in which such
poets thrive.
The Society requests any inter-
ested dogs (or their owners) to
call Grace Wyman at 2-0018.

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